Gratitude

Honoring a promise made to the late Quogue Village Historian and keeper of the flame Pat Shuttleworth, At Quaquanantuck is happy to share once again—even if it’s not in newsprint that can be put up on the refrigerator anymore—its annual reflection on just a few of the many things for which all of us who are lucky enough to spend time in this blessed community can be truly grateful.

Canal sunset. —A. Botsford Photo

With so many challenges confronting us on all sides in this year’s perfect storm of pandemic and politics, along with a volcanic eruption of natural disasters and molten social issues, it is more important than ever that we understand just how fortunate we are to be living in Quogue, so that we might better show compassion and generosity to those who are not so blessed. 

With beachfront erosion even under the best of circumstances a constant threat, we can all be extremely thankful that 2020 was another off year for hurricanes making a direct hit on the eastern seaboard. Still, we must always honor the lessons of the past by remaining vigilant, heeding evacuation warnings, and following safety protocols when a major storm has the East End even tangentially in its sights. And bear in mind that there have now been 30 named storms — 13 of them hurricanes —in 2020, breaking a record set in 2005. It’s not a question of if another major storm will hit Long Island, only when. 

Inlet dune. —A. Botsford Photo

We can be thankful for, and humbled by, the courage and community spirit of the members of the Quogue Volunteer Fire Department and all first responders, ready to make whatever sacrifices are called for to ensure the safety and protect the property of all residents.

And we can be grateful for the certainty that once we get past the restrictions imposed by the pandemic, the fire department, which has continued to give fire safety lessons to Quogue School students, will resume all the activities and programs that help give our village its identity and that have been sorely missed this year: the Halloween Ghost Parade, support services for Santa’s visit to the Village Green, the Easter Egg hunt, the annual Open House, and the traditional pancake breakfast at the firehouse on Thanksgiving weekend. 

It’s true: Heroes work here. Heroes also volunteer at the Firehouse next door; still more heroes work in the Village Office and on village crews. —A. Botsford Photo

Likewise we can be thankful that we are blessed with the talented teams of people who work for the Village of Quogue and serve in village government, in the Village Office, on the police force, and out on the roads and bays: their dedication to helping us all keep safe through the pandemic and their community spirit translate into the best possible quality of life for all of us.

We can be grateful that our beautiful Community Hall has been, and will be again, a center for the performing arts on eastern Long Island, home to the Quogue Junior Theater Troupe and the Hampton Theatre Company as well as the Quogue Chamber Music series and special Westhampton Garden Club programs, all possible because of the support of the fine folks in Village Hall, donors, subscribers and volunteers,  and the creative people dedicated to making theater and presentations of the highest quality to honor this support. 

Ryan Fay and Quogue School students get ready for their turn in this year’s in-school edition of the Hudsy Run to benefit heart healthy activities at the school. Students in all classes took part in the run on Friday, November 20.

We can give thanks that the Quogue School has been certified as one of the best on the East End—and in all of New York State—courtesy of the caring and committed teachers, administrators, support staff and the Parent Teacher Association all working together to create a truly superlative and nurturing educational experience, all while meeting or exceeding the highest standards of elementary school education.

The Quogue Pond on Jessup Avenue in its summer attire. —Shirley Kennedy Photo

Our village is blessed, too, with the fantastic Quogue Library, which has never missed a step in serving as the cultural beating heart of the village, even while the major makeover of the library building has been underway: first by presenting live programs at the Firehouse, courtesy of the QFD, and then, when the pandemic hit, switching to the virtual realm. 

Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom’s vision of the Quogue Librarian as a scarecrow.

Give credit for that to an enthusiastic and thoroughly engaged board of directors and an accomplished and helpful staff. The overwhelming support and vote of confidence that the library received for the project was clearly offered in recognition of the vital role the library has in binding our community together, across generations, different viewpoints and disciplines.

Another jewel of our village is the Quogue Historical Society, managing and curating the artifacts and accounts of Quogue’s storied history dating back to the 17th century for the benefit of young and old, today and for generations to come.

Pennimans Point. —Margot Carr Photo

On the northern border of our village sits another reason to be thankful: the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, where—thanks to the Southampton Town Wildfowl Association, the village, the town, and thousands of supporters since 1934—all are welcome to wander and experience and learn about the unspoiled natural beauty of this area, the flora and fauna and hundreds of direct links to the spirit of Quogue’s past. 

Although the Westhampton Garden Club doesn’t have our village name in its title, Quogue is clearly ever-present in the hearts and minds of its members. The WGC established and maintains all the public gardens in Quogue, including the flowers and greenery at the Village Green; the historic garden at the Quogue Library; and the Butterfly Garden at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, calling attention to “The Pollinators” and threats to the monarch butterfly and bee populations, among others. The WGC has also brought renowned speakers to the village, offering engaging and compelling programs that have packed the Community Hall. 

The Village Dock at the end of Quogo Neck may soon overtake Key West in the category of “site of the most photos taken of the sunset.” —Lynn Lomas Photo

Need more? How about the Quogue Association? Nothing inspires gratitude like the efforts of a group of people who get together to inform, educate, do good works, and throw great parties based on a shared love for the place where they live. It is incumbent upon all of us who care about our village—and is there anyone who doesn’t?—to join or donate to the Quogue Association, or if you are already a member, to renew your membership right away, at quogueassociation.org.

The beautiful, tree-lined “business district” of our village, on Jessup Avenue and out to Montauk Highway, has never been more vibrant, with a wondrous makeover of the Quogue Country Market, which will now be open year-round, and shops like Double Rainbow, Homespun, the Little Q Quogue Shop, Quogue Liquors, Blown Away Dry Bar and Salon, Flowers by Rori and Jen Going Interiors offering a range of goods and services to delight all ages and tastes. The beautiful private Quogue Gallery is another jewel in the necklace of our business district; a socially distanced opening reception for “Lauren Lyons: Bender of Fiction” is scheduled this weekend, on Saturday, November 28, from noon to 7 p.m., with only five visitors allowed in the gallery at any one time. Masks and social distancing required. 

Summer sunup. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Continue with the checklist: The Post Office, the Board of Election volunteers, the Village Dock and boat launching ramps, the expanded Village Beach facility and the drawbridge that provides access to it, the Quogue Cemetery Association: all of these places and institutions and the people who work for them and who make them work so well: all of  these contribute essential and cultural services, texture and color to make Quogue truly beautiful, and unique. 

At Quaquanantuck is aware that these are the most obvious elements of life in our village that prompt our gratitude. Photos and news items regularly sent in to this column by readers over the course of the year offer a more nuanced picture. It is hoped that readers will continue this practice; please send news and social items, comments and observations, and photos (in Large size if taken on a smartphone) to AtQuaq@gmail.com

On a personal note, At Quaquanantuck is sincerely grateful to all the people who have shown their appreciation for this column by sending in payments for voluntary one-year “subscriptions,” so that the column, now posted monthly, can continue to be accessed for free by all who care to read it. 

Seeing the health crisis and economic havoc wrought by the pandemic in our nation and around the world, seeing so much conflict and so many forced to flee their homes in countries around the globe, and seeing so many challenges facing so much of the world today, may we all be ever mindful of all the natural beauty and all of the many blessings we share in this village as we celebrate this holiday of gratitude. Happy Thanksgiving!

Mirror ripples. —A. Botsford Photo

Giving Thanks

At Quaquanantuck has been thinking recently about a brief scene in the David Mamet written and directed film “State and Main” from 2000. 

After a spectacular and dramatic car crash, the movie star character in the film played by Alec Baldwin is pulled from the now upside down vehicle. Befuddled, inebriated and basically unscathed, he surveys the situation and without missing a beat he laughs and declares matter of factly, “So that happened.” 

Dunes at dusk. —A. Botsford Photo

While the recent presidential election, by all accounts of the secretaries of state, was well run and essentially free of irregularities, everything that has happened since—all the destruction of faith in how our democracy is supposed to work—certainly qualifies as an ugly, slow motion and somehow unending car crash from which it remains to be seen whether the republic can emerge in one piece.

Once again, as with the health care crisis and economic devastation brought on by the pandemic, as with the long overdue reckoning with systemic racism that flared after the killing of George Floyd, as with the evidence in wildfires, hurricanes and floods of the horrifying impact of climate change, we are prevented by our divisions from squarely facing these tremendous challenges and doing, as a nation, what must be done to overcome them. 

This is not news; it’s all anybody talks about anymore: our divided nation. But what will it take, how much of a cataclysm must we suffer, before we finally step away from self-interest and loyalty to “our side” and actually do something about it? 

It has to start with an agreement of some kind. If we can agree on our gratitude for living in this beautiful if troubled country, that could be a start. If we can agree about a basic set of facts—that the coronavirus is not “like the flu,” for example, but a deadly disease and scientists actually know how to stop its spread—perhaps we can get to a place where we can agree that we can only snuff it out if we listen to the scientists and all work together. That we need to put the interests of the whole nation ahead of our own. 

It’s simple arithmetic: a fraction of our nation can’t possibly surmount the challenges we face, right now or in the years ahead. We need the whole thing, as stated in the pledge: one nation. We have to work together if we hope to get out of this wreck. Division is subtraction; it makes us less. 

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today. 

Olcott Pond. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Time to Give Thanks by Taking Action
It has often been observed that perhaps the best way to show sincere gratitude is by truly honoring the gifts and blessings that we have received. And so it is with the extraordinary blessing—especially during the daunting days of the coronavirus pandemic—of being able to shelter in place in the beyond beautiful bubble that is Quogue. 

Honoring the myriad benefits of living in this place means showing our appreciation by supporting all the people and institutions that help to make our community so special, from the businesses and stores on Jessup Avenue and Midland to the personnel of village government, the Police Department and Fire Department; from the Quogue Library, Quogue Wildlife Refuge and Quogue School to the Quogue Association, the Quogue Historical Society, the Westhampton Garden Club and Quogue Chamber Music, Hampton Theatre Company and Quogue Junior Theater Troupe. And the list goes on. 

Autumn beach panorama. —John MacWilliams Photo

Fortunately for all of us fortunate residents, each and every one of these institutions makes it easy for us to give our support, always demonstrating that they love this community just as much or more than any of us and always working overtime to be sure they contribute more to our exceptional quality of life than could ever be measured by our support. 

Let’s look at our vibrant downtown business district. From Beth’s Cafe, the Quogue Gallery and Jen Going Interiors at the south end of Jessup Avenue right down the street and around the corner to Blown Away Dry Bar and Salon and Flowers by Rori on Midland, Quogue residents are indeed blessed to have such a great array of shops and services. 

New Quogue Country Market General Manager Pete Gragnano, left, and Chef Mike Nicholson. —A. Botsford Photo

With Best Market in Westhampton Beach now closing indefinitely on November 26 before morphing into a Lidl store (one cashier suggested a six-month hiatus), the Quogue Country Market has now become even more essential. How gratifying, then, that the QCM is now planning to stay open through the winter.  Guiding the transition into year-round operation, Peter Gragnano, left above, is the new general manager. Mike Nicholson, right, is the new chef, and he has already won over many fans with his ready made dinners and fresh soups—minestrone, chicken tortilla, and mushroom bisque, to name a few—daily. 

Chef Mike says his menus tend to be “vegetable centric, root to stem.” Examples of recent winners include: Atlantic salmon with rice-quinoa pilaf and roasted vegetable medley; chicken rollatini stuffed with goat cheese and asparagus, with roasted shallot red pepper sauce; seared Greek chicken topped with Kalamata olives, grape tomatoes, pepperoncini peppers and feta cheese; homemade chicken pot pie; shrimp scampi over pasta with peas, olive oil and garlic; and old fashioned meatloaf and gravy, to name just a few. 

This week Chef Mike said he was going to be making “meatless meatballs.” 

For those interested in having someone else do the cooking for Thanksgiving, stop by the market and check out what’s on offer. The deadline for ordering is Friday, November 20. Email quoguemarketllc@gmail.com

Homespun at 142 Jessup Avenue will be open seven days a week starting November 23, noon to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. —Lulie Morrisey Photo
Double Rainbow is open six days a week, noon to 4 p.m. , Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Tuesday. —Lulie Morrisey Photo
Quogue Liquors is open seven days a week, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. —Lulie Morrisey Photo
Flowers by Rori is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. —Lulie Morrisey Photo
Proprietor Theresa Fontana strikes a pose in front of the Little Q Quogue Shop. Signs in the windows of Little Q and Beach down the street indicate that both stores are “on a break, gearing up for a ‘fab’ holiday season.” Both stores are set to reopen on Wednesday, November 25, at 10 a.m. —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Hudsy Run Going Virtual for 2020
Organizers of the Hudsy 5K Run/Walk—the annual event honoring the late Joan Hudson that funds heart-healthy activities at the Quogue Elementary School—were not about to let the coronavirus put the kibosh on this well-loved tradition. Instead, like many other determined souls before them, they are going the virtual route. 

Participants of all ages will still be actually running and walking, but instead of doing it all together on the same day at the same time, they will be doing it from November 21 to November 29 on their own terms, their own time, and in many cases on their own 5K course that they choose or set for themselves. 

With a nod to the face-covering world we now inhabit, instead of special t-shirts this year, the first 150 participants will receive a Hudsy 5K buff/gaiter. Keepsake bibs (not required for participation) will be mailed out to all registrants; allow 3-5 business days to receive.

The savvy folks at events.elitefeats.com/hudsy20 have got all the technical details well in hand, and will guide registrants through the process, including choosing your distance and your course, the right apps to use on your smart phone to record your run, and when and how to submit times. And if running or walking are not your thing, there is a space on the registration form to make a straight up donation; no exertion of any kind required. 

To find out more and to register, right up to November 29, visit or paste into your browser events.elitefeats.com/hudsy20. For more information, call Ryan Fay at 631-653-4285. 

Left to right, Officer Anthony Comito, Chief Chris Isola, Lieutenant Daniel Hartman, and Officer Ashleigh Trotta of the Quogue Village Police Department with the non-perishable food items collected so far in the Thanksgiving Food Drive undertaken by police departments and schools and students in Southampton Town. Residents can donate food in the front lobby public area of the police station through Friday, November 20. —A. Botsford Photo

Quogue Chamber Music Making the Most of Grant Funds
Like so many other cultural arts institutions around the world and right here on the East End, the members of the Quogue Chamber Music board of directors were beyond crestfallen when the pandemic forced the cancellation of first the June concert and then the September concert, in other words, the entire 2020 season. 

Showing the kind of resourcefulness that cultural arts presenting organizations are more and more becoming known for, though, Quogue Chamber Music has found a way to make good use of grant funds awarded in the fall of 2019 by the Huntington Arts Council for use in 2020. The cancelled school concerts planned for last March are now being replaced with virtual programs for the children of the Quogue, East Quogue and Hampton Bays elementary schools. The good news is that these virtual concerts will reach many more children than would have been possible with live performances.

QCM President Jane Deckoff reported that, happily, “the musicians we have engaged for previous children’s programs, all graduates of Carnegie Hall’s Ensemble Connect, have agreed to put together two programs for the area children, to be ready later this month. So the funding from the Huntington Arts Council will not be allowed to  fall through the cracks.”

Members of the Manhattan Chamber Players are scheduled to perform in the Quogue Chamber Music concert on June 19, 2021.

The QCM schedule for 2021 features concerts on June 19 and September 11. As Ms. Deckoff wrote: “We are eager to be reunited with you, our wonderful audience, and we sincerely hope that the circumstances will cooperate with our plans … On behalf of the musicians and the Board, here’s to you … to music … and to brighter times ahead!”

For more information, check out the updated QCM website, www.quoguechambermusic.org.

Historical Society Offers Glimpses of the Past … and Great Gifts
At Quaquanantuck  sincerely hopes that all readers have joined—or will join—the Quogue Historical Society so that they may reap the many rewards of membership. At a time when so many of us are sheltering in place, just the QHS at Home page of the quoguehistory.org website alone is worth far more than the nominal cost of an individual or household membership.

Online exhibitions here include: “Quogue’s Early 20th Century Postcards’; “A Moment in Time: Photographs of Quogue Streets, 1942”; “Quogue Through the Lens of George B. Brainerd, ca. 1875”; “1822 Schoolhouse: 2019-2021 Restoration” and “1822 Schoohouse: History.” Other lovely features of the QHS at Home page include Talks Online via Zoom, Virtual Tours, and Children’s Activities.

Early postcard of Louis Muley’s successful automobile repair shop on Jessup Avenue, c. 1907.

Another wonderful benefit of joining the QHS is getting your email address on the list to receive beautifully timed illustrated nuggets of Quogue history researched and presented by Historical Society Curator and Southampton Town Historian Julie Greene. Recent offerings include: a fascinating look at the 1790 Census in Quogue; “1950s Halloween on Jessup Avenue”; “The Election of 1836: Daniel Webster for President” and, arriving on Veterans Day, “The Admirable Admiral,” about naval officer, strategist, author and historian Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914). 

Admiral Mahan is accurately described by Ms. Greene as “without a doubt the most influential and historically significant figure ever to reside in Quogue. (Daniel Webster comes close, but was just a visitor.)” Heady stuff. 

One of the recent emails sent to QHS members, with the subject line: “Quogue Book with a View,” focused on a charming viewbook of Quogue and also pointed the way to some lovely gift ideas. 

Front cover of viewbook.

As Ms. Greene wrote in that email: “In the late 19th and early 20th century, before cameras were portable, travelers purchased picture postcards and postcard-sized viewbooks to remember the places they visited. 

“The souvenir viewbooks had distinctive eye-catching covers and featured photographs, lithographic images, engravings, and charming illustrations. Not only mementos of vacations, they were also popular with businessmen and real estate investors, who often gave them to clients to encourage property investment in certain areas.” 

Interior page, Quogue cottages.

Ms. Greene went on to recount how Louis Muley, owner of Muley’s Garage and Machine Shop on Jessup Avenue and known in the village as the “car doctor,” put together “Pictorial Views of Quogue, On the Sunrise Trail, Long Island, New York,” a 22-page souvenir book of photographs and sketches of notable Quogue streets, landscapes, cottages, and commercial buildings.

“Pictorial Views of Quogue” was printed and published, ca. 1917, by the Albertype Company, of Brooklyn, originally known as Wittemann Brothers. This Quogue’s viewbook was available for purchase at Muley’s, A.A. Tuthill’s drugstore on Quogue Street (now Beth’s Café), and other village locations.

Back cover, Muley’s newly renovated auto shop.

Today, these once-affordable viewbooks are sought-after collectors’ items. Village residents can be grateful that “Pictorial Views of Quogue” has been reproduced and is available for collecting or gift giving at a still-affordable price on the Quogue Historical Society website, quoguehistory.org.

Visitors to the History page of the website will also find some other great Quogue-centric gifts in the Society’s Collections. In “Voices of Quogue: A Small Village Remembers the Way We Were,” author Meredith Murray documents 20th century life in our village through the reminiscences of 14 of Quogue’s longtime residents. “Quogue’s Heritage Road” was prepared for the QHS by Melissa Cook, Dick Gardner and Frances Ryan and published in June, 2009; revised and reprinted November 2011.

“Notes on Quogue: 1659-1959” by Richard Post was published by the Quogue Tercentenary Committee in 1959. Other titles include: the oral history collection “Quogue As We Remember It: A Collection of Memories”; “Hurricane of 1938, Vol. I” and “Hurricane of 1938, Vol. II.” For more information about purchasing, visit the website or email info@quoguehistory.org

Quogue Gallery Opens “Lauren Lyons: A Bender of Fiction” November 24
Serving as the launching point for a very promising career with collectors and in galleries, the Quogue Gallery will present “Lauren Lyons: A Bender of Fiction” from November 24 to December 31, featuring 12 large scale provocative photographs from highly stylized shoots that the artist conceived and styled over the course of the past 20 years. The exhibition opening next week represents the first time these photographs are being exhibited formally together in a gallery.

A socially distanced and responsible reception for the artist will be held at the gallery at 44 Quogue Street from 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday, November 28. 

Lauren Lyons, “Lauren” (1/5), 2008, Archival Pigment Print on Hahnemühle German Etching Paper, 42 x 42 in (106.68 x 106.68 cm). —Image courtesy of the Quogue Gallery

Ms. Lyons is a self-taught photographer who got her start decades ago photographing musicians in Philadelphia and New York City. Over the years, she has made photographs for album covers, promotions, concerts, and festivals and worked with record labels, magazines, concert promoters, A&R scouts, and advertising agencies. 

In a telephone interview this week, Ms. Lyons said that her fine art photography was born out of her complete immersion in shooting for the music industry. She was captivated, she said, by the “tawdry, somewhat seedy, edgy demimonde of club life, which is not at all who I am,” and she started thinking about ways to create provocative images that could render some sense of the attitudes and sensibilities of that offbeat and avant garde world. 

Each of the resulting photographs represents a vision that is uniquely her own, from the original conceptualizing to scouting and choosing unusual locations, deciding on wardrobe or coming up with physical modifications for nudes, scene and model styling, and adding props. “The only thing I don’t do,” she said with a laugh, “is hair and makeup.”   

Sabrina De Turk, an Associate Professor with the College of Arts and Creative Enterprises at Zayed University in Dubai and a friend of Ms. Lyons, wrote this about the artist’s work:

“The power of observation is overwhelmingly present in the work of Lauren Lyons. Her intense photographic portraits capture emotions both fleeting and timeless. Context and scene are important components of the image, yet, in the end, it is the haunting and evocative characters in her work who are the most compelling…

“Often single figures occupy the picture frame, sometimes staring out at the viewer, even defying the camera’s lens. And when the interaction is more subtle, when the subject seems to have been taken unaware, there is a powerful sense of human presence and the viewer understands that they are privileged to occupy a position as spectator … We do not necessarily understand the dramas or psychic conditions of her photographs—indeed some scenarios beg further explanation—yet we are drawn to watch, to see more, and if not to know, then to imagine.”

Lauren Lyons, “Amy” (1/5), 2001, Archival Pigment Print on Hahnemühle German Etching Paper, 42 x 42 in (106.68 x 106.68 cm). —Image courtesy of the Quogue Gallery

Born in Southern Delaware in 1969, Ms. Lyons moved to Philadelphia about 30 years ago. As a result of her love of music and her involvement with the music industry as a photographer for many years, she was selected to be a voting member of the Grammys and held that distinction for 18 years. The artist lives and works in Philadelphia and Quogue. 

Quogue Gallery is at 44 Quogue Street, Quogue, NY 11959. For more information, visit quoguegallery.com.

Wildlife Refuge Embraces the Spirit of Giving
Support for the Quogue Wildlife Refuge is always a win-win, packing tons of fun into fundraising and giving immeasurable value for any and all contributions, whether you signed up for a Walk for Wildlife in honor of National Hiking Day, ordered bird seed in the annual sale, tucked in to a benefit dinner, place an order for cool gear or a holiday ornament from the online gift shop, or make a gift of a QWR membership, an animal adoption, or an engraved brick in the Butterfly Garden.  quoguewildliferefuge.org/gift-ideas

Left to right, Quogue Wildlife Refuge Executive Director Mike Nelson and Assistant Director Marisa Nelson (with screech owl) with Chris and Joanne Richards of CJ’s American Grill in Mattituck.

Just last week, for example, Assistant Director Marisa Nelson reported that the Refuge “raised over $1,000 thanks to the generosity of CJ’s American Grill in Mattituck. Pasta Night on Veterans Day was a success, with most folks choosing take out on the rainy day, and some enjoying the open-air, beautifully illuminated and festive tented dining area.” 

“One of our permanently injured resident screech owls came along,” Marisa wrote, “and folks loved meeting him and learning about this native species. Chris and Joanne Richards, owners of CJs (where Chris is the chef), were going to be our Gala caterers this past summer; they are very generous throughout the entire East End community and their food is delicious.”

Marisa attributed some of the success of this year’s bird seed sale to the fact that “more folks are out east, and many folks are working from home, finding enjoyment in bird watching and feeding their feathered friends.”

A sample of some of the excellent gifts available in the QWR online shop (quoguewildliferefuge.org/shop) would include such items as: embroidered fleece and quilted apparel; QWR hats in a range of colors; the super sturdy Seed Bunker all-season bird feeder; water bottles; plush Audubon birds that play the bird’s real song when squeezed; and the beautiful, hand-crafted, 100 percent lead-free pewter QWR ornament, to name only a few. Shopping is conveniently online only, with curbside pickup easily arranged. 

Readers are urged to remember to check in frequently at quoguewildliferefuge.org/events/ for more information and details on upcoming virtual and in-person socially distant programs. Coming up in November, for example, are: “Winter Waterfowl of Long Island” (virtual program) on Friday, November 20, at 4 p.m.; “Turkey Talk & Craft” (virtual program) on Saturday, November 21, at 10 a.m.; and a “Full Moon Night Hike” on Monday, November 30, at 5 p.m.  

Get all the details and register at www.quoguewildliferefuge.org

Beach scraping. —Andrew Cirincione Photo

Courtesy of Quogue Library, Virtual Programs Abound
Of the many things to admire about the Quogue Library—its tireless staff, its board of directors, its volunteers—one of its most extraordinary strengths these days is its momentum. Look at the wide array of virtual programs sponsored by the library, and you’ll see it is way past overcoming inertia. 

Looking ahead, popular ongoing exercise classes include Pilates on Mondays at 10 a.m. and Sculpting and Cardio Dance for all ages on Tuesdays at 10 a.m., both with instructor Leisa DeCarlo; and Yoga with Jillian for adults and youngsters 8 and up on Fridays at 10 a.m. 

Adult programs coming up include a Virtual Paint Party to create a “winter wonderland” scene on an 8- by 10-inch canvas with artist Marie Camenares on Sunday, November 29, at 7 p.m. All supplies will be provided in a kit to be picked up at the Quogue Library. The next meeting of the Anti Racism Book Club will be on Tuesday, December 1, at 7:30 p.m.; discussion will focus on the Ta-Nehisi Coates book, “Between the World and Me.”  

Family programs on the calendar include another program led by Wildlife Biologist and Naturalist Eric Powers of the Center for Environmental Education & Discovery, “What Makes a Mammal a Mammal?” on Thursday, December 3, at 4:30 p.m. The program will examine this diverse and fascinating group of animals, ranging in size from the smallest shrew to the giant blue whale, investigating locomotion, body structure, biology, and more, with special appearances from live mammals.

Children’s programs include a Thanksgiving Story and Pine Cone Turkey Craft  on Saturday, November. 21, at 10:30 a.m., with craft supplies available to pick up at the Midland office through Friday, November 20.

There will also be a Thanksgiving themed Zoom Bingo session on Tuesday, November 24, at 6:30 p.m. 

For more information or to register for any of these programs, visit the Quogue Library website at quoguelibrary.org and click on the program flier on the home page. Remember that new programs are added regularly, so check the website often to make sure you don’t miss out. 

“Dad, I really think these masks you got are waaay too big.” —Liz Byrne Photo

Library Will Welcome Snowmen to Replace Scarecrows on Jessup
Meanwhile, the scarecrows on Jessup Avenue may be coming down, but not to worry: Quogue Village Mayor Peter Sartorius has approved the library’s “Snowmen Stroll” event. 

Registration and pickup of snowmen templates will begin on December 7, and the last day to return finished projects to the Midland library office will be December 19. All participants are asked to inform the library if they wish to keep their snowmen after the “stroll” ends on January 22. 

The “Snowmen Stroll” from the area around Jessup Pond and down Jessup Avenue begins on December 21 and continues through January 22. The snowmen will be taken down on January 23 and available for pickup by their creators on January 24 at a location to be announced. 

With two weeks to go until the templates can be picked up, it’s not too early to start dreaming and designing your snowman now. 

As for the library’s ongoing renovation and expansion project at its headquarters on Quogue Street, Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom wrote this week that “the library is anticipating opening in January or early February. Still lots of daily progress, but still much work to be done.” 

The current goal, Ms. Bloom wrote, is to schedule a grand opening of the updated and expanded facility on June 26. 

Common cormorant, a member of the pelican family. —Florrie Morrisey Photo

Hampton Theatre Company Readies Virtual Performance
Members of the Hampton Theatre Company, denied the opportunity to present a live holiday show this year, are working on a socially distanced performance of the “Lux Radio Theater Miracle on 34th Street.” The performance will be filmed on December 16 and then posted on the HTC website, HamptonTheatre.org on December 19 in conjunction with the company’s end-of-year appeal.

Essentially cut off by the coronavirus from audiences and longtime patrons since last March, the HTC has been upping its game lately on social media. Patrons, theatre lovers and the merely curious are urged to check out (and “like”) the company’s posts on Facebook (@hamptontheatre; facebook.com/hamptontheatre); Instagram (hamptontheatre; instagram.com/hamptontheatre) and YouTube (youtube.com/channel). 

And keep an eye on social media and the HTC website, hamptontheatre.org, for information about the upcoming “Lux Radio Theatre Miracle on 34th Street” and the company’s end-of-year appeal. 

From Stage, to YouTube, to Your Kitchen
Rosemary Cline, the vice president of the Hampton Theatre Company board of directors and one of the company’s principal actors, has been instrumental, with HTC General Manager Terry Brennan, in the aforementioned updating of the HTC’s approach to social media. 

When last spring’s May production was cancelled due to the pandemic, she decided to take on a different role, launching a new enterprise, Essenza di Gusto, all about food as joy: “seasonally oriented, passionately driven.” 

In addition to posting upbeat Italian cooking instructional videos on the Essenza di Gusto YouTube channel, Ms. Cline and chef Christopher Tattanelli have also been offering beginning-to-end meal preparation in clients’ homes, as detailed on the Essenza di Gusto website, essenzadigusto.com

Now, with the gift-giving season upon us, Ms. Cline and Chef CT are creating Essenza holiday boxes “for that special client gift, or to treat yourselves.” Check out essenzadigusto.com for details on the holiday boxes and information on how to order. 

Early Review Praises Rosenblatt’s “Cold Moon”
A Kirkus review slated to be published December 1 has high praise for another great gift idea: the latest book by Quogue literary light Roger Rosenblatt, “Cold Moon—On Life, Love, and Responsibility” (Turtle Point; November 3, 2020; 104pp). 

Characterizing the new book as “memories and musings from the winter solstice of a life,” the reviewer begins with a quote that lays out the central theme of “Cold Moon”: 

“‘Better to know where to go than how to get there,’ writes the veteran essayist and author of fiction and nonfiction. ‘I wander from thought to thought, having learned but three things from my long night’s moon. I believe in life. I believe in love. I believe we are responsible for each other.’” 

The review goes on to note: “In brief passages connected by association and with the improvisational feel of jazz, [Rosenblatt] moves fluidly among memoir, philosophy, natural history, and inspiration, riffing on everything from the migration of the Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle to the landscape photographs of Oleg Ershov and the plot of a movie he saw in 1946 [when he was 5] called ‘Stairway to Heaven.’ 

“Though much of the book is a meditation on aging, it is illuminated by childhood memories … one more charming and emblematic than the next. In another passage, the author recounts walking into a stranger’s house and sitting down to play their gorgeous Steinway, which had ‘the gleam of a black stallion.’ When the neighbor escorted her 6-year-old visitor home, she commented to his mother on his fearlessness. ‘It’s the way he is,’ his mother replied. ‘He thinks the world is waiting for him to walk in and play the piano.’ Nearly 75 years later, he hasn’t changed a bit.”

The reviewer’s final judgment on the new book could just as easily be an assessment of the author himself: “A tonic for tough times filled with plainspoken lyricism, gratitude, and good humor.” Congratulations, Roger. 

Quantuck sunset. —Inger Mejean Photo

Fall Leaf Pickup Now Underway
Protocols for having the Village pick up leaves are identical to last year’s rules (as outlined on the November 6 posting on the Announcements page of village website at www.villageofquogueny.gov). To wit: 

“Leaves must be on the shoulder of the street by December 15 in order to be picked up. Do not pile leaves around fire hydrants or utility equipment. Do not use plastic bags; they will not be picked up, and you will have to remove them. No brush, such as twigs and branches, or lawn cuttings will be taken away, and mixing this debris with leaves will result in the leaves not being removed. 

“Brush with branches up to 3 inches in diameter may be taken to the Westhampton recycling facility free of charge from November 15 through December 31. In addition to the foregoing, property owners and landscapers who take leaves (only) from a Quogue property may make arrangements with the Quogue Highway Department to dump them at the highway yard. That will avoid having piles in front of your property waiting to be picked up and blowing back onto your lawn.” 

Morning on the marsh. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Quogue Family in Search of a Kidney Donor
As we give thanks at this time of year for all the abundance that surrounds us and all our many blessings, our gratitude can’t help but be magnified when we remember how many there are who are in desperate need.

Such is the case for Cathy Lee Gruhn, daughter of the much-loved Quogue couple Don and Judy Gruhn, whose advancing chronic kidney disease dictates that she seek a living kidney donor in order to extend her life. 

As Cathy wrote this week: 

“A kidney, from a living donor, will provide me more freedom and the ability to live a longer, healthier, more normal life. Asking people to consider donating a kidney is difficult for me, but I know it will greatly improve my chances of living. I’m completely aware of the magnitude of this ask and words cannot express my gratitude if a kidney comes my way. 

“A transplant will give me more cherished time with my wonderful family and friends, time to watch my niece grow up and watch her achieve her dreams as well as give me time with my beloved pets. I’ll be able to continue my passion for baking, have the energy to use my spin bike, as well as plant vegetables and plants in my garden.  

“The challenge is finding a kidney. There are more than 100,000+ people on the waiting list for a deceased donor. Time isn’t on our side as many of us will wait for years; many of us will die while waiting. The average wait time is eight-plus years. My best hope is to receive a kidney from a living donor. 

“You might not be familiar with living donation and I understand many are afraid of surgery and what living with one kidney will mean for them.  Here is some basic information that may be helpful:

  • You only need one kidney to live a healthy, long life.
  • Most donor surgery is done laparoscopically, meaning through tiny incisions.
  • The recuperation period is usually fairly quick, about two to three weeks.
  • 100% of the cost of your evaluation and surgery is covered by the recipient’s insurance.  The hospital can provide you extensive information on this.
  • You will have a separate team of healthcare professionals to evaluate you as a living donor. Their job is to help you understand the risks and benefits and look out for YOUR best interests.

“If you’re interested in learning about becoming a living kidney donor and/or possibly donating to me, please visit: Yale New Haven Transplant Center – Center for Living Organ Donors at www.ynhh.org/organdonation, or you can call: 1-866-925-3897 (you must have the correct spelling of my name: Cathy Lee Gruhn).  

“I now ask you to please share this, my story, with everyone, including but not limited to your family, your friends, your family friends, your friends of friends … Please help me by using social media and its connections so I can find a kidney and continue living to my fullest. 

“I don’t believe in regrets.  I believe there are reasons for everything.  It’s important to smile and laugh daily and to see life with the “glass half full,” not “half empty.” I’m more spiritual than religious; I do, however, believe we aren’t given more than we can handle.  None of us were promised life would be easy, but I think we can all agree that life is very precious; and I hope to continue mine so I can help others. cathyneedsakidney@gmail.com

As neighbors, it is incumbent upon us to do whatever we can to bring Cathy closer to receiving a donation. Our blessings come with the responsibility to honor them. 

Suspended animation. —Patricia Prentis Photo

At Quaquanantuck Grateful for Your Support
I’d like to once again offer my sincere thanks to all those who have responded so generously to my request for donations in the form of voluntary subscriptions to help me defray expenses and keep At Quaquanantuck always free for all who care to read it. 

Readers have so far sent in donations ranging from $30 to $300 (the equivalent of five voluntary annual “subscriptions” at the suggested “price” of $60) to support this free online publication, now being posted monthly. 

Meanwhile, I am continuing the appeal through the end of 2020. So, if you have the wherewithal, the column continues to have value for you in the monthly format, and you’d like to support keeping it a free resource for the community, please consider taking out or renewing a voluntary subscription (i.e. contribution) of $60 … or more … or less. 

Contributions may be made using PayPal by clicking here; with Venmo to user name Andrew-Botsford-1; or by check made out to Andrew Botsford and mailed to PO Box 1524, Quogue, NY 11959. 

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Just Do It

And, we’re back. It would beggar the meaning of the word understatement to say that a lot has happened since this column was last published a month ago on September 24. Curiously, though, a case could be made that in these surreal and continuously challenging days of the novel coronavirus, little has changed. 

Casting for clouds. —A. Botsford Photo

Some 32 weeks in, the virus continues to surge, now in even greater numbers, across the country and around the world, at latest count closing in on claiming a quarter of a million lives in the U.S. alone. Yes, a quarter of a million lives. The terrible health costs, withering economic travails, and brutal education challenges associated with the pandemic for everyone still continue to be borne disproportionately by Black, Latinx, and low income Americans. 

With a presidential election ramping up the stakes—and emotions and anxieties—and both sides working tirelessly to control the narrative, social media and also major media outlets continue to turn massive profits by mining rich veins of disinformation and inflammatory rhetoric, with their artificially intelligent algorithms continuing to drive the wedge of division ever deeper into the country’s political and social consciousness. (See: “The Social Dilemma.”) The once-bright, illuminating candle of civil discourse based on agreed upon facts continues to gutter and seems in constant danger of being permanently extinguished. 

So, what to do? When the only change that seems to be occurring is that things are getting incrementally worse, how can we as individuals help to effect the change we’d like to see in the world? How can we, as the U.S. Constitution intended, strive to put aside self interest for a clear-eyed moment and advocate for the greater good for all Americans? You probably know what comes next: We can vote. We can honor the gift, the blessing, the privilege, the honor, and the right that by dint of much struggle over many years is granted to all citizens: We can vote. 

October monochrome. —Ginny Rosenblatt Photo

While casting a vote is in itself the most important thing and first priority, it is hoped that no vote is ever cast thoughtlessly or solely as a reflexive act of party affiliation. Like marriage, the act of voting should not be entered into unadvisedly or lightly; but reverently, discreetly, advisedly, and soberly. Don’t rely on what the candidates and their supporters say about themselves, nor on what their opponents and their supporters say about them. Look at the facts, and not the spin, of their records. 

Never rely on a single news source; few—beyond PBS perhaps—still seem as strongly committed to providing what used to be called “fair and balanced” coverage, or offering equal time to different viewpoints so that voters can decide for themselves whose values most closely align with their own. Everyone needs to do their best to drill down through all the layers of spin, disinformation, opinions, and misinformation to the actual facts about all the issues, including perhaps most especially the Covid-complicated process of voting this year. 

In the end though, it bears repeating that the act of casting a vote is the most important thing. With all the clamor and confusion about mail-in and drop box voting this year, in person voting, whether early or on Election Day November 3, seems like the choice inspiring the most confidence that your vote will be counted without being subject to any potential controversy or litigation. And while coronavirus fears are understandable, Quogue seems a reasonably safe polling site (at the firehouse on Jessup Avenue from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. on November 3) if voters continue to observe social distance protocols and wear a mask.

For those who would still prefer to vote by mail or drop box, complete information is available by clicking on or visiting www.ny.gov/early-voting-and-absentee-voting-mail-or-dropbox

For registered Quogue voters who wish to vote early in person, the nearest locations are at the Riverhead Senior Center, 60 Shade Tree Lane in Aquebogue, and the Stony Brook Southampton campus, 70 Tuckahoe Road in Southampton. Early voting begins on Saturday, October 24; the hours are the same at both locations, shown below. 

The hours for early voting in person at the Riverhead Senior Center in Aquebogue and at the Stony Brook Southampton campus.

Southampton Press to Videotape Goroff-Zeldin Debate
The 100 free “tickets” for the October 26 Express News Group Congressional Debate on Zoom were all snatched up just moments after they were made available on Wednesday, but do not despair. Video footage of the event will be posted at 27east.com afterward and will be available for viewing right up to Election Day. 

Nancy Goroff

That means that even those who intend to vote early will still have a chance to see the debate as soon as October 27 before heading off to one of the two nearby early voting locations. 

The debate will feature 1st Congressional District challenger Nancy Goroff (D) squaring off against the incumbent U.S. Representative Lee Zeldin (R), who is seeking reelection. Executive Editor Joseph Shaw will moderate the “roundtable” conversation, which will dispense with time limits and other restrictions to allow a more freeform conversation about the issues. 

Lee Zeldin

There is evidence indicating that political debates at the presidential level have historically had little effect on voters changing or making up their minds. Even so, At Quaquanantuck believes that when it comes to candidates vying to represent our district in Congress, it is immensely helpful to hear what they have to say and to see how they comport themselves. And there is benefit, too, in hearing how they defend themselves against the attacks previously levelled at them from a safe distance by their opponents prior to the debate. 

Be a better informed voter. Check out the video of the debate at 27east.com, which should be posted by Tuesday, October 27,  before you vote.


Septober sunset. —A. Botsford Photo

At Quaquanantuck Grateful for Your Support
This seems like a good place to offer my sincere thanks to all those who responded so generously to my request in the September 24 column for donations in the form of voluntary subscriptions to help me defray expenses and keep At Quaquanantuck always free for all who care to read it. 

Taking me at my word that no amount was too small or too large, almost two dozen readers have already sent in donations ranging from $30 to $300 (the equivalent of five voluntary annual “subscriptions” at the suggested “price” of $60) to support this free online publication, now being posted monthly. 

Meanwhile, I am continuing the appeal through the end of 2020, although it will be printed less obtrusively going forward at the bottom of the November and December columns. 

So, if you have the wherewithal, the column continues to have value for you in the monthly format, and you’d like to support keeping it a free resource for the community, please consider taking out or renewing a voluntary subscription (i.e. contribution) of $60 … or more … or less. 

Contributions may be made using PayPal by clicking here; with Venmo to user name Andrew-Botsford-1; or by check mailed to PO Box 1524, Quogue, NY 11959. 

And now, back to the news. 

Coming into their own. —Judith McDermott Photo

Albany Guidance Nixes Halloween Ghost Parade
This week’s e-missive from Quogue Village Mayor Peter Sartorius (now available on the Announcements page of the village website at www.villageofquogueny.gov ) is chockablock with New York State Covid-19 updates and advisories as well as helpful resources and information about voting. But perhaps the most significant information for Quogue’s youngest residents (and their parents) was the guidance on trick-or-treating and the fate of the annual Quogue Fire Department sponsored Halloween Ghost Parade down Jessup Avenue to the firehouse. To wit: 

“Halloween guidance arrived from the Governor’s office earlier this morning:  coronavirus.health.ny.gov/seasonal-celebrations. Traditional trick-or-treating is discouraged but not prohibited. Quogue will allow it, but people should follow the guidelines. Kids over age 2 must wear a cloth or surgical mask but not in combination with a Halloween-type mask. Stick with members of your own household only, but if you do run into others maintain a social distance. 

Double, double toil and trouble. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

“Homeowners should bag individual packages of their commercially-wrapped treats and leave them outside in a row where they can be picked up singly, not in a bowl. Families should bring hand sanitizer and use it and wash hands immediately when arriving home.  

“The usual Fire Department-sponsored parade for kids will not be held this year, unfortunately, because of the mass gathering restrictions limiting them to 50 people.”

Hizzoner concluded his discussion of Halloween with a scary thought, writing: “The Governor increased the fine for violating these restrictions to $15,000, by the way.”

The Ghost Parade and gathering of costumed revelers at the firehouse may be two more casualties of the coronavirus, but it is hoped that parents and children will find ways to keep the Halloween spirit alive, fueled as ever by the consumption of delicious, sugar filled treats.  


“Halloween Ha Ha” at Quogue Shop October 31
Always in step with the spirit of each successive season, the Quogue Shop on Jessup Avenue is holding a safe, social distance “Halloween Ha Ha” on Saturday, October 31, at noon.

Bare bones. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Plenty of tricks and plenty of treats are promised, and there will be snacks and prizes for all. All ages are encouraged to dress in their Halloween best and meet up at The Quogue Shop at 144 Jessup Avenue.


The renovation and expansion project at the Quogue Library is closing in on completion. —A. Botsford Photo

Library Director Offers Update on Renovation and Expansion Project
Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom was kind enough to share with At Quaquanantuck this week a brief progress report on the extensive renovation and major updating of the historic library building on Quogue Street. 

“The renovation work on our Library is moving along beautifully; progress happens daily,” Ms. Bloom wrote in an email. “We do not yet have an opening date as many elements need to fall into place in order to open the library doors to [the public]. The homestretch includes installation of finishes, furnishings, technology and the book collections.” 

“Covid has complicated our renovations, and will continue to complicate our service, but we are monitoring the state guidelines and anticipate being able to open for in-person service in some capacity this Winter.

“The next few weeks’ efforts will include lots of exterior work,” she wrote, “including seeding and landscaping. We can’t wait to welcome the community back to the library.”

And the community can’t wait to be welcomed, to be sure. 


Members of the Westhampton Garden Club masked up to gather at the Lily Pond Native Plants Garden on Friday, October 16. Second from the right, kneeling, is Sue Avery. —Lynda Confessore Photo

Garden Club Tends Native Plants Plot by the Pond
Courtesy of faithful correspondent Lynda Confessore, At Quaquanantuck has the following report:

“Members of the Westhampton Garden Club gathered at the Native Plants Garden, established by the club on the Lily Pond in Quogue, for a fall cleanup and winterization on Friday, October 16.  Sue Avery, the environmental chair of the Federated Garden Club of New York and head of the Long Island Native Plant Initiative, had helped with the initial design and was on hand again on Friday to discuss potential additions and the educational value of the garden. 

“WGC president Melissa Morgan Nelson noted that the garden is part of the club’s mandate to conserve native plants, woodlands and open spaces in our region.  The cleanup was followed by a plant and seed exchange for members to share and then try new plants and seeds in their respective gardens. WGC will also contribute to a propagation project exchange at the Garden Club of America’s annual meeting.”


Refuge Seed Sale Order Deadline October 22
Speaking of seeds, today, October 22, is the last day to get orders in for the annual bird seed sale fundraiser for the Eastern Long Island Audubon Society and the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, made possible through the generosity of Eastport Feed. 

The idea is to start the season off with plenty of seed so you can enjoy observing the birds at your feeders all winter long. Drive-through curbside pickup will be on Saturday, November 7, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge.

Click here to download the mail-in (or drop-off) order form, or complete the order form online by clicking on or visiting quoguewildliferefuge.org/event/annual-seed-sale-fundraiser-6.

And remember to check in frequently at quoguewildliferefuge.org/events/ for more information and details on such programs as the Earth Yoga Outside (social distance program) on Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m.; the “Creatures of the Night” (virtual program) at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, October 28; and the Full Moon Night Hike at 6 p.m. on Friday, October 30, to name only a few.

Turn, turn, turn. —A. Botsford Photo

Scarecrows and Virtual Programs Keep Quogue Library Lively
The second annual Quogue Library Scarecrow Stroll was installed on Jessup Avenue this week, to impressive effect. The creative figures will be hanging around until November 9 so be sure to go downtown to look them over. Maybe ask one to dance at the Quogue Shop’s Halloween Ha Ha on October 31. 

Librarian scarecrow designed by Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom. —MaryAnn Scuderi Photo

Meanwhile, the library’s virtual calendar is still jam-packed with stimulating and engaging programs. In addition to yoga classes with Jillian and exercise programs with Leisa DeCarlo, consider: “The Grand Masters of American Comedy” on Friday, October 23, at 7 p.m.; a “Chicken Soup for the Soul” dinner and cooking workshop led by chef Robert Dell’Amore on Friday, October 30, at 6:30 p.m.; “How the Internet Changed Media” on Friday, November 6, at 7 p.m.; and the Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion Series on “Artificial Intelligence and Data” on Saturday, November 7, at 5 p.m.

The background for the FPA discussion involves the fact that policymakers in many countries are developing plans and funding research in artificial intelligence (AI). As global growth started to slow, even before the pandemic, many policymakers turned to AI, hoping it might provide a magic solution. To protect users, the EU, Brazil, and other Western countries have adopted regulations that grant them greater control over their data and require that firms using AI be transparent about how they use it. Will, or should, the U.S. follow suit?

For complete details on the library’s virtual programs, and to register, check the library website, www.quoguelibrary.org. Remember that new programs are added regularly, so check the website often to make sure you don’t miss out. 

Helen Frankenthaler, “Mary, Mary,” 1987, Color screenprint and offset lithograph, 41 x 31. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

“Meeting of Masters” on View at Quogue Gallery
“Figurative and Abstract Expressionism: A Meeting of Masters” is the title of the current exhibition on view at the Quogue Gallery at 44 Quogue Street. 

On view through November 23, the exhibition brings together such historically recognized masters as Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Joan Miró, Ray Parker, and Emerson Woelffer with some of their peers whose significance has been reassessed and brought to light in recent years. These include Harry Bertschmann, Fay Lansner, Norman Carton, Sam Glankoff, Raymond Hendler, Vincent Pepi, Ben Wilson, and others. 

This show pairs household names with rediscoveries in order to help collectors better understand the notion of artistic excellence during the second half of the 20th century, a period characterized in a release from the gallery as “a tumultuous era in which both figurative and abstract painters pushed the limits of expression.” 

Adolph Gottlieb, “Orange Oval,” 1972, Original Serigraph on paper, 28 x 36.5. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

The exhibition is in line with the avowed mission of the Quogue Gallery, which is “to present a program of artistic excellence by showcasing the work of prominent, mid-career and emerging artists in the modernist tradition. Its core focus is on discovering and exhibiting figurative and abstract expressionist painters who are recognized historically as well as those of great promise whose work has not received the attention and critical response it so richly deserves.” 

For details on the exhibition or more information about the Quogue Gallery, click on or visit quoguegallery.com.

Aids to navigation. —Paula Prentis Photo

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Season of Change

Right at the top this week, lest any readers miss it, At Quaquanantuck is announcing a change in publication schedule, shifting to once a month from now until at least March of 2021. After this week’s post—barring any cataclysmic turn of events—the next column will be posted on October 22. 

September morning surf. —A. Botsford Photo

Working first as co-author and editor, and ultimately sole author, this writer has borne major responsibility for the weekly Quogue community column for 30 years, or approximately 1,500 columns. For 26 of those years, the column was published by The Southampton Press Western Edition (formerly the Hampton Chronicle-News). Ever since that paper’s publisher decided to cancel all the community columns at the end of 2016 (save one or two personal favorites in the Eastern Edition), with the encouragement and support of faithful readers I have been writing and posting the column online weekly since January 2017. 

Although transitioning to the world of digital media involved (and continues to involve) an array of challenges for a longtime print journalist, I have been happy to take these on to keep the column going. My motivation has always been to describe, support and celebrate the unique and very special community that makes Quogue so much more than just another Hampton. If that motivation was boosted a bit by my interest in spiting the publisher, so be it; no apologies. 

For the first two and a half years of publishing the column myself—believing then as I do now that the column should always be free to all and there must never be a paywall—I posted the column without any remuneration. In May of 2019,  I asked readers with sufficient wherewithal to consider making voluntary contributions to partially cover time and expenses, suggesting that a $60 donation, or voluntary subscription, would break down to $5 a month, or a little more than $1 a column for one year. 

Windshield watchers. —A. Botsford Photo

Before the coronavirus changed everything, my plan was to make another appeal for voluntary annual subscriptions (donations) a year later, in May of 2020. But the combination of the new pandemic reality and a large influx of new readers thanks to a recommendation from Mayor Peter Sartorius made the timing of a request for new “subscriptions” and “renewals” of contributions seem problematic.

 I am recounting this history only to provide the context for my decision to change the publishing schedule to once a month, and to reassure readers that it is not based on financial considerations. I have never expected or planned for the column to provide meaningful income, and I remain very grateful to all those who have made contributions to help me offset costs, and to all those who have offered support and encouragement in other ways.

The simple fact is that gathering and compiling the information, taking photographs, writing, editing, processing contributors’ photos, setting up the column and photos on the website, managing the email address list, and sending out the eblasts as each column is posted has begun to take up all my time, at the expense of other writing projects that have fallen by the wayside. 

My commitment to reflecting the best parts of our community back to itself remains firm, and I hope that will be evident in this column and the monthly columns to come. See what you think. Next spring I’ll make another assessment on scheduling, but in all cases I am committing now to continuing the column until at least the beginning of next summer. 

North Fork sunrise. —Ginny Rosenblatt Photo

In the meantime, if the column continues to have value for you and you’d like to support keeping it a free resource for the community, please consider taking out or renewing a voluntary subscription (i.e. contribution) of $60 … or more … or less. No amount is too large or too small. 

Contributions may be made using PayPal by clicking here; with Venmo to user name Andrew-Botsford-1; or by check mailed to PO Box 1524, Quogue, NY 11959. 

And now, on to the news. 

Library Sponsors Quogue Census Awareness Day
Today’s the day: Thursday, September 24, is Quogue Census Awareness Day!

And what is Census Awareness Day, you may ask? Well, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today Census Educators arriving at the corner of Jessup Avenue and Village Lane in the Suffolk County Library System’s outreach van, the SLED, will join Quogue Library staffers to answer questions and help residents complete the census form. 

That’s right: you can fill out the Census on site today, with Suffolk Libraries Empowering Discovery (SLED) crews on hand to answer any questions and help you navigate the form. As multiple news accounts have made very clear, it is extremely important for the future of village residents and all Americans that we have the most accurate census possible. 

If you haven’t filled out the form online or on paper, or you know others who haven’t been counted yet, please be sure that you and/or they get over to Jessup Avenue today and fill out the form. We’re all counting on you. 

‘Tis the season … —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Michael Nelson Awarded Quogue Bowl
As many residents are no doubt aware, the Quogue Association periodically presents the Quogue Bowl to persons deemed to have made extraordinary contributions to the civic life of the village.

And so it was that at the Association’s annual meeting on Saturday, September 12, just such an individual was recognized in the person of Michael Nelson, the Executive Director of the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. 

 Mr. Nelson has served two three-year terms as a member of the Quogue Association’s board of directors and has been involved in a number of QA beautification projects throughout the village. Currently holding the position of 1st Assistant Chief of the Quogue Volunteer Fire Department, he has served for 18 years as a first responder with the Department. 

His involvement with the Quogue Wildlife Refuge dates back some 30 years to the time when he began volunteering there in 1991, working his way up in relatively short order to the position of Executive Director he has held since 2000. 

Congratulations to Michael and thanks to the Quogue Association for recognizing another exceptional individual in our village. 

Quogue Bowl honoree Michael Nelson. —Photo courtesy of the Quogue Association

Quogue Authors Beha and Rosenblatt Are On Fire
Terrific news to share in this space about two supremely gifted members of Quogue’s pride of literary lions: Christopher Beha and Roger Rosenblatt

Harper’s Magazine Editor Christopher Beha, the first writer featured in this summer’s Conversations with the Author series sponsored by the Quogue Library, was named to the Longlist of 10 contenders for this year’s National Book Award for Fiction for his novel, “The Index of Self-Destructive Acts.” The finalists in all five National Book Award categories will be named on October 6. 

Christopher Beha —Ira Lipke Photo

The National Book Award recognition is in line with the tremendous critical response garnered by the novel, which was shared in earlier At Quaquanantuck posts this summer. The National Book Foundation announcement of the Longlist describes “The Index of Self-Destructive Acts” as one of two novels on the list that “interrogate interpersonal relationships and self-concept.” 

The announcement provides this synopsis of the book: “statistics whiz Sam Waxworth arrives in New York City to write a monthly column for a venerable magazine and soon finds himself entangled in a crumbling family empire,” before going on to declare that “Beha’s novel meticulously explores the relationship between the old guard and new meritocracy as Waxworth unpacks his complicated relationship to his analytics career.”

Meanwhile, long considered a very hot number by his legions of fans, legendary raconteur and fussy eater Roger Rosenblatt may actually ignite on Wednesday, October 7, at 7 p.m. when he will be the subject of “a good old-fashioned roast” live on CrowdCast. The roast is being virtually hosted by the independent Book Revue bookstore in Huntington. 

Roger Rosenblatt—Chester Higgins, Jr. Photo

Organized in honor of his 80th birthday (Gasp! Say it ain’t so, slugger!) and the upcoming release of his new book, “Cold Moon” (Turtle Point Press; October 27, 2020; available for pre-order now), the event, which is free and open to the public (register by clicking here), will feature such incandescent celebrity roasters as Alan Alda, former poet laureate Billy Collins, the wonderful author Meg Wolitzer, PBS Newshour host Judy Woodruff, cartoonist and master satirist Gary Trudeau, lyricist and songwriter Alan Bergman, and Quogue’s own Whiting Award-winning author Genevieve Sly Crane

With a complete title of “Cold Moon: On Life, Love, and Responsibility,” the new book is “about the simplest things—what matters most in life,” according to the Book Revue description, “and yet Rosenblatt writes about them with an elegance that reflects his deep wisdom and intelligence. This is a book for now, when we’ve all been thinking about what is truly important, and it is also a message for always.”

As many area residents know, Roger Rosenblatt is the author of five New York Times Notable Books of the Year, four national bestsellers, and seven Off-Broadway plays. His essays for Time magazine and the PBS NewsHour have won two George Polk Awards, the Peabody, and an Emmy, among others. In 2015, he won the Kenyon Review Award for Lifetime Literary Achievement. He held the Briggs-Copeland appointment in the teaching of writing at Harvard, and he is now Distinguished Professor of English and Writing at SUNY Stony Brook/Southampton.

Everyone is encouraged to tune in to the roast, but note that registration is required. To register, go to or click on www.crowdcast.io/e/roger-rosenblatt-roast/register. To pre-order “Cold Moon,” click on or go to www.bookrevue.com/book/9781885983886. This event is BYO virtual marshmallows. 

Nature and wildlife photographer Florrie Morrisey captured this marvelous image of a whimbrel, an uncommon shorebird and the first she has ever seen, on the morning of September 8. —Florrie Morrisey Photo

Toward a Quieter Quogue
There is a new movement afoot in the village to lower the decibel level of lawn and landscape maintenance and thereby enhance the cherished serenity and tranquil quality of life that so many residents hold dear. 

Chief organizer of the new movement is Steven Wilson, who has already rallied a number of like-minded souls and circulated a couple of emails in a bid to enlist more support. In his first email, Mr. Wilson outlines his objectives this way: 

“In an effort to lessen noise pollution in our village and help Quogue reduce its carbon footprint, improve health, safety, and quality of life, we are proposing the enactment of a village ordinance that would: 

“1. Require the phased-in adoption of battery-based or electric lawn maintenance machinery for those lawn contractors doing business in Quogue. These machines are significantly quieter than the gas-powered machines in current use, not to mention far more eco-friendly. They’re comparable in cost, if not less expensive to purchase and operate. 

“2. Ban or significantly restrict the use of leaf blowers. Leaf blowers are incredibly noisy and are a health hazard, as they kick up pollutants and allergens, while providing dubious added value. Some municipalities have banned them altogether, and many, many others have limited their use to autumn or particular days.”

The group needs help in several areas as the members work to develop a “bullet-proof” presentation to Mayor Peter Sartorius and the Village Board of Trustees. Anyone sharing the same goals and interested in helping out is encouraged to email Mr. Wilson at stevenwilson@swcreative.com.

Big break outside. —A. Botsford Photo

Lessons of ’38 Hurricane Still Powerful 82 Years Later
Many thanks to the Quogue Historical Society and QHS Curator Julie Greene for sharing earlier this summer a concise account and stunning photos of the Hurricane of 1938, which roared across Long Island 82 years ago on the afternoon of Wednesday, September 21. 

One of the most iconic local images from the 1938 hurricane shows the Beach Lane Smedburg house and next to it a Quogue police cruiser in Ogden’s Pond. The Quogue Coast Guard Station in the background withstood the storm, but all its windows were blown out.

The closest we have come to experiencing a hurricane so far this year was when Isaias worked its way up the coast and inland. As Ms. Greene so aptly pointed out, as the storm weakened from a hurricane to a tropical storm, its every nuance was reported in real time, as is the way in the age of the Weather Channel. On the day when winds from Isaias approached Quogue, a warning went out at 2:15 p.m. that a tornado was just eight miles south of Southampton and moving at 65 miles per hour. Even casual weather watchers could easily and precisely calculate its arrival time, and take cover if necessary.

The odds on being properly prepared were much lower 82 years ago. As Ms. Greene wrote: 

“When the Great Hurricane of 1938 struck here on the afternoon of Wednesday, September 21, few people had received any warning at all that a violent storm was brewing. The U.S. Weather Bureau had issued storm warnings midmorning, but with no indication the storm was likely to be especially dangerous. A little after noon, ‘whole gale’ warnings were issued, meaning a severe storm with high winds. It was not yet called a hurricane. Moreover, the warning was poorly handled by broadcast companies: the storm was barely mentioned.

The Beach Lane bridge, above, was destroyed, and the Ocean Avenue bridge badly damaged. The Post Lane bridge was built in 1941, a middle compromise that rendered the other two street names meaningless, as neither led to an ocean or a beach any longer.

“By 1 p.m., with conditions deteriorating rapidly, the U.S. Weather Bureau’s upgraded warning was too late for Long Island. By 2 p.m. the first trees began to fall. Warnings were sent out to the schools. By 3 p.m., the storm center had reached Westhampton Beach. The 1938 Hurricane was one of the fastest-moving storms on record, dubbed in headlines ‘the Long Island Express.’

“The day after the hurricane, a veritable army of Works Progress Administration (WPA) men began arriving at the Westhampton Beach train station, and the New York State WPA director began organizing his forces, about 900 men.

“Their work was to look for survivors and the missing, remove refuse, salvage items, and clear roads. Later they worked on the beach, putting in pilings, wire, and pine trees to build up the dunes that had been flattened. They were paid just 50 cents an hour, and yet this hurricane cleanup was instrumental in lifting the East End of Long Island out of the Depression ahead of the rest of the country.

Surging water in Quantuck Bay wiped out the Quogue-Quiogue Causeway.

“The loss of life was high on the East End: 29 people died in Westhampton Beach, 2 in Quogue, along with many, many others as the hurricane rolled north through New England.”

Ms. Greene pointed out that the recent storm Isaias, which had weakened to a tropical storm by the time its edge clipped eastern Long Island, “left crews removing felled trees, fixing downed power lines, and assessing the severe beach erosion. More than 300,000 households on Long Island were without power for several days.”

Debris littered Dune Road. In just a matter of minutes, 153 of the 179 summer homes from Quogue Village to the Moriches Inlet were destroyed. The 26 houses remaining were mere battered shells, a dozen of which were never habitable again. —All photos courtesy of the Quogue Historical Society

The highly detailed forecasting of today notwithstanding, no amount of preparation can deflect the almost unimaginable devastation that would be wrought by a direct hit, storm surge, and lingering presence of a Category 4 or 5 hurricane on our shores. The best we could hope for would be to reduce the loss of life.

Small village; big sky. —A. Botsford Photo

Quogue Library Keeping the Virtual Calendar Lively
As always, there’s a wide array of programming coming up at the Quogue Library over the next few weeks. 

In addition to yoga classes with Jillian and exercise programs with Leisa DeCarlo, a few standouts worth mentioning would be: “The Golden Age of Television” on Friday, September 25, at 7 p.m.; “Marketing Yourself in a Tight Job Market” on Tuesday, September 29, at 6:30 p.m.; the Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion Series on “The Philippines and the U.S.” on Saturday, October 3, at 5 p.m.; the Anti-Racist Book Club discussion of “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontent” by Isabel Wilkerson on Tuesday, October 6, at 7:30 p.m.; and this year’s Quogue Library Scarecrow Decorating Event (Not a Contest!) starting with pickup of scarecrow frames on Monday, October 2. 

For complete details on these and many other stimulating and engaging programs, and to register, check the library website, www.quoguelibrary.org. Remember that new programs are added regularly, so check the website often so you don’t miss out. 

Grey tree frog. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Outdoor Education for Youngsters at Refuge
The Quogue Wildlife Refuge is introducing two new education programs for children this fall: the “Wildlife Wednesdays After School Program” for children in grades K through three and grades four through seven meeting in separate groups from 3:30 to 5 p.m. on Wednesdays from September 30 to November 11; and “Tree Time Toddlers” for children age 2 to 4 accompanied by an adult on Thursdays from 9:30 to 10:15 a.m. starting October 1. 

Complete details and registration at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge website, www.quoguewildliferefuge.org

The QWR calendar also features, along with Earth Yoga Outside on Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m.: a Full Moon Night Hike on Thursday, October 1, at 6:30 p.m.; “Autumn Reflections on Nature” social distance readings of poems and prose for the entire family on Saturday, October 3, at 3 p.m.; socially distanced “Fall Foliage Paddles” at 11 a.m. on Saturday, October 17; and a “Help Save Sea Turtles!” virtual program, also on Saturday, October 17, at 2 p.m. 

Get all the details and register at www.quoguewildliferefuge.org

Prepare to Vote
Before signing off until October 22, At Quaquanantuck urges all Quogue residents and all Americans to respect and honor one of the greatest gifts of our democracy, the right to vote. Please make every effort to steer clear of the toxicity of social media, examine the facts, check the moral compass and conscience, and make your choice. 

Quogue seems a reasonably safe place to vote in person, but if you want to consider voting early, information is available at www.suffolkcountyny.gov/Departments/BOE/Early-Voting-Sites-11-3-2020.

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email
AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Week 25

Here we are again: Labor Day, the traditional button on the end of the traditional summer season. 

But in more ways than can be easily counted or described, this has been anything but a traditional summer season. And just as, thanks to the pandemic, the so-called “season” started way early with thousands fleeing the city to shelter at houses on the East End, it looks like there is no clear end in sight for the 2020 summer season, traditional or otherwise.

moonrise 1 AB (2)
Atlantic moonrise. —A. Botsford Photo

 It seems somehow appropriate that Labor Day weekend coincides almost exactly with week 25 of the global siege of the coronavirus pandemic. Half a year, so far, of disruption, confusion, economic turmoil, cultural conflict and tragedy on a massive scale, along with millions of acts of heroism, courage and kindness, large and small, ingenuity, innovation and adaptation. More than 185,000 deaths, and counting, in the U.S. alone. 

Half a year of the brutally clear coronavirus X-ray revealing a terrifying and crippling number of fracture lines in all our institutions and our society. Even more daunting, as chaos gathers momentum like a tropical storm, and with the school year, the U.S. census, and the national election—among much—mired in a confusion of competing interests, there seems to be no clear way forward. 

The crossroads and convergent crises the world is facing in the sepulchral shadow of the pandemic are inescapable. Still, living inside the blessed bubble that is Quogue can make it possible to turn a blind eye, or to think that these are not our problems, these are issues for others who are affected to sort out. 

But make no mistake: as much as Covid-19 and all its repercussions represent a scourge of unfathomable proportions and an existential threat, it is also a test, perhaps the greatest test any of us will face in our lifetimes. It’s a test that we as a nation have been failing so far. As has been declared many times in this space and elsewhere, if we cannot find a way to pay close attention, to acknowledge that we as Americans are all in this together, and to work together with a unified set of values to bring some sense of order out of the chaos, we will continue to fail. 

So far, coming together in this way has seemed to be an insurmountable, too complicated challenge. The political, social, and cultural response to the pandemic has continually widened the gap and deepened the chasm between “us” and “them.” But when faced with a common foe of such magnitude it should be simple. Let’s put aside the arguments about whose values are correct, erase the lines in the sand, and soften the rigid positions. It’s not supposed to be us against them; that’s the path to self-destruction. It’s “We the people.”

Let’s not be us anymore. Let’s not be them. Let’s be we.

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.

Storm departs LJ (2)
Departing storm. —Lynn Joyce Photo

Upside Down and Gone
Anecdotal evidence indicates that there are more than a few readers who don’t read all the way to the bottom of each week’s At Quaquanantuck. So, this week, in honor of Labor Day and the topsy-turvy world we find ourselves in these days (along with this columnist’s desire to do things differently), the column will be presented in almost reverse order from what readers have seen in recent weeks. 

Therefore, the first item is an announcement that might typically be more suitable at the end of a column: The At Quaquanantuck columnist is taking a two-week vacation after filing this week’s post. Readers can expect the next column on Thursday, September 24

The purpose of the vacation will be to rest and reflect on: how the column has evolved over the three plus years since I began posting it weekly for free; the ways the column and readership have changed during the 25 weeks, so far, of the pandemic and the initial stay at home and quarantine orders; and the purpose and intention of publishing weekly, up until now and going forward. 

Try not to miss the column too much, and please come back to read it again when it resumes. In the meantime, those readers who are feeling too bereft can always go to the website, AtQuaquanantuck.com, and scroll down through the archives to browse columns of the past.

creek peace RC
Still water. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Letter to the Editor ré: Moley Falls
An exciting development this week: At Quaquanantuck’s very first Letter to the Editor, running near the top of this week’s column because it refers to an item at the bottom of last week’s post. 

Editor’s note: Before perusing this communication, anyone who didn’t read to the end of last week’s column might want to scroll down to read the item referred to in the letter below, headlined: Moving On from Machu Picchu, Moley Envisions New Water Feature.  

To the editor: 

I would like to commend Mr. Botsford for drawing the Quogue community’s attention to my ongoing crusade to enhance the beauty of our outdoor living spaces, but feel compelled to correct some of his misrepresentations of my past work and future plans. 

I was indeed able to construct a reasonable facsimile of Machu Picchu, which I dubbed “Moley Picchu,” in our backyard, though Andrew may not have seen it since he has repeatedly turned down invitations to spend a quiet evening of reflection there. As for my yearning to add a rainbow during these trying times, I admit I contemplated tapping into the Pine Barrens aquifer for a personal waterfall to add to (not replace) Moley Picchu, but soon discovered that the concrete aqueducts I sought as a means to bring water to Moley Falls required variances that the Zoning Board would not approve. 

I also came to recognize that the use of millions of gallons of water for such an endeavor was as wasteful as it was expensive. So, just as I made compromises on the scale and scope of Moley Picchu, I looked for some innovative, low-cost solutions to achieve my more recent dream. After learning (sadly) that Fountains of Wayne in New Jersey was no longer in business, I contacted Lexi at Mike’s Fountainry (555 Second Avenue, Lindenhurst) about adapting the water-pump feature in their porcelain fountains for an environmentally friendly faux waterfall. Boy, did I save thousands – and the Zoning Board had no objections! However, that didn’t solve my rainbow issue, as the waterfall isn’t nearly powerful enough to spray out sufficient water droplets to cause a full-spectrum refraction. 

So I went on Amazon and took a chance on an “LED Rainbow Projector” that cost me—get this!—$15.99 (the decimal point is correct, folks!). And though the Zoning Board has balked at my projecting the rainbow at night (and really, have you ever seen a nighttime rainbow?), I’ve been able to get approval to enjoy it from dawn to dusk. We’re still putting on the finishing touches (including a pair of vintage bathtubs I bought from a guy who worked on a Quialis shoot), but I’m excited to share my landscape architect’s rendering of how the completed project will look. Faithfully, Roger Moley

Moley Pichu
Landscape architect’s rendering of planned addition to Moley Picchu. —Image courtesy of Roger Moley

The Reverend Stephen Setzer Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Stephen Setzer will officiate virtually at this summer’s final Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, September 6, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Born and raised in the hills of Western North Carolina and the son of a Baptist preacher, Reverend Setzer acknowledges on his website that he “spent so much time in church that it could be said, ‘That boy cut his teeth on a church pew!’” From childhood through college he spent the bulk of his time in Baptist churches and institutions, and it wasn’t until he was in his early 20s that he discovered the Episcopal Church while studying theology at Dallas Theological Seminary. 

“I wandered into a beautiful Episcopal parish called Church of The Incarnation,” he notes on his website, “and my life has never been the same. Since then I have had the privilege to work, serve, and study in diverse places, both international and domestic.”

Rev Stephen Setzer
The Reverend Stephen Setzer

He earned his certificate of graduate studies at Dallas Theological Seminary in 2010 and his Master of Divinity degree in 2013 at Wycliffe College, University of Toronto. He is currently pursuing further studies toward his Doctor of Ministry degree at Fuller University. 

Ordained in 2013, Reverend Setzer began his ministry at the Cathedral Church of St. Matthew in Dallas. In 2015 he and his wife, Yoana, moved to Wilmington, Delaware, to serve as associate rector at Christ Church Christiana Hundred. Last year they moved again, this time to Manhattan, where Yoana now works as an attorney at Kirkland and Ellis, and Reverend Setzer works at a technology startup while also launching a new project, SacrdSociety, which seeks to help individuals and churches create new forms of community in a post-COVID world. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to go to www.quoguechurch.org for the Zoom link or send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com.


42 tap SP (2)
Above, dancers in the Quogue Junior Theater Troupe younger show of “We’re All in This Together” tapping a number from “42nd Street.”  Below, left to right, Chloe McAuliffe playing Sue Prior, Luke Williamson playing Andrew Cuomo, and Eva Bramwell playing CBS Television reporter Jennifer McLogan. 

Full C Tomorrow SP (2)
The full cast knocks out “Tomorrow” from “Annie.” Under this year’s format, the show was filmed on Saturday, August 29, for viewing on different platforms and on DVD at a later date.—Sue Prior Photos


Foreign Policy Association Looks at “China’s Road into Latin America”
The Foreign Policy Association (FPA) Great Decisions Discussion program, sponsored by the Quogue Library and moderated this summer on Zoom by Susan Perkins and David Rowe, will tackle the issue of “China’s Road into Latin America”  at 5 p.m. on Saturday, September 12. To register, click here, or go to the Quogue Library website, www.quoguelibrary.org, and click on the Great Decisions flier on the home page. Latin America China

The FPA 2020 April update provides the detailed context for the upcoming discussion. During the COVID-19 pandemic, China quickly moved to strike deals with many of the nations of Latin America to provide medical supplies and other goods to help combat the spread of the virus on the continent. In addition to protective health gear for doctors, testing kits and ventilation masks, China has also promised large donations to these nations to ease some of the economic difficulties caused by the virus. 

China has sought to focus attention on its international response and recovery, rather than on Wuhan having been the initial epicenter of the virus. “It’s remarkable and a credit, in a way, to China’s own commanding control of information,” said Margaret Myers, “that it’s been able to re-envision itself as a leader in the fight against coronavirus globally.” Ms. Myers is the author of “China in Latin America” in Great Decisions 2020.China Latin America

COVID-19 has already had a drastic effect on life in Latin America, despite not having as many confirmed cases as Europe or the United States. Major slowdowns in trade, especially that of crude oil, have done a lot of damage to the economies there. Goldman Sachs recently adjusted its projections for the Latin America region saying that economic growth, which was projected at +1.1 percent, will drop to -1.2 percent due to COVID-19. In addition to the economic problems, political protests in Chile, ongoing since October of 2019 in the large Plaza Italia in Santiago, have been forbidden because all large gatherings now require permission from the government.

Meanwhile, not all relationships between China and Latin America remain strong. The relationship between China and Brazil has been fraught since the election of Jair Bolsonaro, who espoused anti-Chinese views when he was running for office. Since the outbreak of COVID-19, Bolsonaro and members of his staff have traded barbs with Chinese officials. 

Brazil’s Education Minister Abraham Weintraub has suggested that China is using the COVID-19 outbreak and response to make a profit. Chinese officials have vehemently denied these rumors and have said that these actions have “caused negative influences in the healthy development of bilateral relations.” Still, despite Jair Bolsonaro’s plan to move away from Chinese influence, China remains Brazil’s largest trading partner.Sino Latino Americano

As the Trump administration continues to withdraw from the world stage, China is looking to fill the void. After a short video on the subject, the September 12 discussion will examine these challenging questions: How does Latin America fit into China’s “One Belt, One Road” plan? How will the relationship with China affect the region? Should the U.S. be concerned about China’s growing “sphere of influence”? 

The FPA’s list of recommended readings on the topic includes: 

Garrison, Cassandra. “With U.S. hit by the virus, China courts Latin America with medical diplomacy.” Reuters, March 26, 2020. www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus

Simoes, Eduardo. “Brazil-China Diplomatic Spat Escalates over Coronavirus Supplies.” U.S. News & World Report, April 6, 2020. www.usnews.com/news/world/articles/2020-04-06/brazil-china

Call, Charles T. “As coronavirus hits Latin America, expect serious and enduring effects.” Brookings, March 26, 2020. www.brookings.edu/blog/order-from-chaos/2020/03/26

This year’s FPA Briefing Book is available for purchase in digital form from the FPA website, www.fpa.org, or by clicking here. The FPA website also has a complete list of topics for this year’s Great Decisions Discussions. 

The Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program provides background information and policy options for the eight most critical issues facing America each year, serving as the focal text for discussion groups across the country. For more information, visit www.fpa.org.

Quogo Sunset SB (2)
Quogo Neck sunset. —Stefanie Beck Photo

Remembering Ambrose A. Carr Jr.
Longtime Quogue resident Ambrose A. (Amby) Carr Jr., a man of deep Catholic faith and tremendous love for his family and friends, died on August 29. He was 89.

Before his family bought a house in Quogue in 1937, as a child he summered here with his family in the large inns along Quogue Street. 

Born in Brooklyn on May 26, 1931, he moved later in life to Manhasset to raise his family. He was educated at Brooklyn Preparatory High School, College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA,  and New York University Graduate School of Business. His family said that he always regretted not being able to serve in the military because of his color blindness. 

Mr. Carr worked at IBM for 33 years in the New York area, predominantly in Sales and Marketing. His last position with IBM was as the Director of Industry Relations in Corporate. After retiring in 1988, he volunteered for an organization called Morality in Media. 

Known to have many interests and enthusiasms, he was a Renaissance man of sorts, as seen in his study and enjoyment of music, languages, mathematics, and theology. He enjoyed taking his family skiing in Vermont, so much so that he skied until he was 83; one of his favorite pastimes was teaching the young folks how to ski. 

He also enjoyed racing one-design sailboats at Manhasset Bay Yacht Club and Sunfish at Shinnecock Yacht Club (SYC), where he served as Commodore in the 1970s. In the 1960s he accomplished the major sailing feat of racing in the world-renowned Bermuda Race. He also enjoyed playing tennis at the Quogue Field Club and participating in the club championship tourneys. In retirement, he learned to play golf, his family said, and approached it “with ardor and enthusiasm.” 

Mr. Carr’s contributions to the Quogue community included serving on the Planning Board for many years in the early 2000s and as the President of the Quogue Beach Club for 13 years, from 1991 to 2003. His love for Quogue and its community and traditions ran deep, family members said, but most importantly he loved it as “the perfect place to gather his family around him.” 

At age 79 he completed the Camino de Santiago in the north of Spain, the 490-mile pilgrimage walk from the foothills of the Pyrenees to the Cathedral of St. James in Santiago de Compostela. Dedicating the trip to the memory of his late wife, he completed the Camino in six trips covering five years. He planned the trip himself, his family said, and invited friends and family members to accompany him on “this wonderful journey of faith and perseverance.” 

“He exuded joy to all those around him, even to the end,” his family said, noting that “Amby’s glistening eyes—which are a window to his soul—his love of life and his warmth and wit will be sorely missed. We hope that his example of faith and character will abide with us.”

Amby C SL
Ambrose A. Carr Jr.

Invited by Amby’s daughter Margot to share some thoughts, friend and neighbor Roger Rosenblatt wrote: 

“The day Nancy died, Amby walked across the lawns of our adjacent homes to tell me. His eyes were a mixture of sadness and surprise, as if to say, “How could this be?” So Amby dies now, and I wonder less how his death could be than how the world could ever have known so sweet a man. 

“To say that someone is sweet may sound like an excuse for a lack of other, more robust qualities. But Amby had them all in abundance: a high spirit, a high intelligence, generosity, tact, courage, humane decency, thoughtfulness, horse sense, a tireless work ethic, and a spry and gentle humor. It’s just that so few men are sweet—and gentle, and tender—that when one finds those virtues in a friend, it’s a gift. When his fine mind was invaded by dementia some years ago, he retained his sweetness, and natural elegance. Only Amby could continue to play the perfect gentleman in the thrall of a corrosive disease. 

“We were friends, good friends. We laughed at the same things, took the same pleasure in jazz and pop music, enjoyed talking about boats and the sea, and were equally amused and appalled at the way Quogue governs itself. But we loved the Village with the same basic ardor.

“He was tickled, and a little embarrassed, that I once wrote of him as having the good looks of a 1930s leading man. But he did. Ronald Coleman. Lew Ayers. We saw eye to eye on most subjects, except God. Amby believed wholeheartedly, joyously. I believe, too, but with more wariness and less  affection. How gracefully he tried to change my mind. 

“In his honor, then, I’ll go this far today: Now Amby and God have each other’s company. I envy God.” 

Predeceased by his wife, Nancy, in 2004, he is survived by his daughter Paula Carr Cummings (Alexander) and their children (his grandchildren) Ian and Sophie; his daughter Margot Carr (Dana Robinson); and his son Ambrose A. Carr III (Elizabeth) and their children (his grandchildren) Maisie and Libby.

A wake will be held on Friday, September 4, from 3 to 5 p.m. at Werner & Rothwell Funeral Home in Westhampton Beach. A funeral mass will be held at the Immaculate Conception Church on Quiogue at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 5. Immediately following the funeral mass, all are invited to the interment at noon at the Quogue Cemetery. All attending the interment are asked to please bring a shell to place at Amby’s grave in honor of the completion of his “Camino,” as the symbol of the Camino is a scallop shell. 

Donations in honor of Ambrose Carr would be welcome at either caringkind, The Heart of Alzheimer’s Caregiving ( caringkindnyc.org) or Immaculate Conception Church of Westhampton Beach.

Morning mtg PPMorning meeting. —Paula Prentis Photo

Quogue Library Offers a Season without End in Virtual Realm
Lots of offerings from the Quogue Library between now and when At Quaquanantuck returns on September 24. Always a good idea to check the library website to see what’s coming up. 

For exercise programs: Chair Yoga with Jillian on Mondays at 4 p.m.; Pilates on Mondays at 10 a.m. and Sculpting and Cardio on Tuesdays at 10 a.m., both with instructor Leisa DeCarlo; and Yoga with Jillian on Fridays at 10 a.m. 

A Zoom program on “Caring for Yourself in Stressful Times” with Cornell Cooperative aimed at parents and families will be offered on Wednesday, September 9, at 4:30 p.m. 

In the Career Workshop category, a career coaching session with consultant Constance Hallinan Lagan will be offered on Tuesday, September 15 at 6:30 p.m. Titled “Thanks for the Pink Slip: The Upside of Being Downsized, Fired, Let Go, Laid Off, Eliminated, Terminated, Etc.,” this Zoom seminar aims to prepare participants for success even if they have “lost” their jobs. 

Ms. Hallinan will also lead another Career Workshop, this one on “Resumé Writing,” on Tuesday, September 22, at 6:30 p.m. 

Movie lovers and cinema buffs will no doubt enjoy a program on “The Golden Age of Hollywood: From the late 1920s through the end of World War II” presented by Brian Rose on Friday, September 18, at 7 p.m.

The next volume to be discussed by the Adult Book Club will be “The Girl With the Louding Voice” by Abe Dare on Sunday, September 13, at noon. 

And the next Zoom discussions of the newly formed Anti-Racism Book Club will be held on Tuesday, September 8, and Tuesday, September 22, at 7:30 p.m. The discussions will focus on the book “How to Be an Anti-Racist” by Ibram X. Kendi.

On Sunday, September 20, at 3 p.m. Quogue Wildlife Refuge Environmental Educator Tony Valderrama will lead a workshop in making “Owl Nature Prints.” Participants will learn about the fascinating nocturnal raptors native to Long Island and create owl print art using a potato or apple cut in half.

For complete details on these and other programs offered by the library, visit the library’s home page at www.quoguelibrary.org or send an email to info@quoguelibrary.org. To register for Quogue Library virtual programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration.

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Card Shark. The creators of the sharks put on display around the Village business district as part of the Quogue Library’s first annual Shark Week are reminded that the wooden replicas will be taken down on Friday, September 4, and placed on the side of the Midland library outpost for pickup. Sharks not collected by Tuesday, September 8, will be discarded. —Ginny Rosenblatt Photo

Wildlife Refuge Continues Outdoor Social Distance Yoga Program
Amy Hess will continue to offer “Earth Yoga Outside” in a socially distanced format at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesdays in September. 

The one-hour class is held in a large outdoor space on woodchips overlooking the pond. Participants are asked to bring a sheet or blanket and as well as a yoga mat. Because the class is outdoors, participants should consider applying sunscreen and insect repellent and should dress appropriately for the meteorological conditions. 

The Wednesday outdoor sessions are currently limited to nine people, and the fee is $15 per class. Class is weather-permitting and registrants will be refunded if class is cancelled. Pre-registration and pre-payment is required; register here or go to www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, find the Events Calendar under Programs, and click on Earth Yoga Outside. For more information, call 631-653-4771. 

Whilst At Quaquanantuck is on hiatus, please continue to check the Events Calendar for updates at www.quoguewildliferefuge.org

To make donations to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. You can also use the QWR “text to donate” app for smart phone users; simply by text QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a simple donation form, right on their cell phones.

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Baby bunny. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

“Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” at Quogue Gallery
On view until September 30, “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings,” featuring 23 new paintings by the artist, is the final show of summer 2020 at the Quogue Gallery. 

“Many of Healy’s paintings are abstractions of shore scenes, being places that have evoked particular moods and feelings in the artist,” notes Peter Hastings Falk, Chief Curator and Editor of Discoveries in American Art. “And it is those feelings that he so effectively materializes with mediums ranging from oil, watercolor, encaustic, oil crayon, lacquers, and colored pencil applied to fragments of canvas, boards, and paper.”

Quogue Gallery is at 44 Quogue Street, Quogue, NY 11959. Quoguegallery.com. For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com.

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Winding Down

The summer that, thanks to Covid-19, never really got to wind up … is now winding down in the last two weeks before Labor Day, just as in years past when there were no coronavirus protocols or social distancing restrictions.

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Glisten. —A. Botsford Photo

And even though it looks like there will be no clear Labor Day line of demarcation in population this year, between “the season” and the “off-season,” even though many people will continue to work remotely from their homes or rentals on the East End, even though some college students will be staying home and taking online classes remotely, still there seem to be fewer cars on the road, fewer people on the beach, more parking places available on village and hamlet main streets. It’s quieter.

And although even now, six months in, no one knows how this thing will shake out, some patterns remain intact. Is there some significance in that? No one knows. We wait. We watch. We try to keep safe. We take it one day at a time. We know that kindness counts. We hope. 

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.

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Right of way. —A. Botsford Photo

Mayor’s Corner: Covering the Bases
In his two most recent email updates for Quogue residents, Mayor Peter Sartorius did his usual fine job of summarizing important information and sharing links for further guidance on a number of pertinent issues. 

To see the complete text of Hizzoner’s “roundup of the usual suspects” (as he quipped in his latest subject line), go to www.villageofquogueny.gov and click on Announcements

Hot topics addressed in last week’s email included: the availability of mail-in voting for the November election (www.elections.ny.gov/VotingAbsentee.html) and the ability of the U.S. Post Office to handle the related mail in a timely way; options for early voting, including at the Stony Brook Southampton campus between October 24 and November 1; registering to vote in Quogue, or changing your voter registration to Quogue, with guidance on deadlines; an update on states on the quarantine list for travelers arriving in New York; and such miscellany as the return of recreational bowling as an option, anecdotal observations on mask wearing (or not) among the younger set, and the (limited) reopening of gyms.

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Study in red. —Ginny Rosenblatt Photo

 This week’s email revisited the ever-changing quarantine list (Delaware is off, again, as of this writing); broached the topic of the need for rental applications for long term rentals, even in the off-season; and disclosed that a committee to carry out the mandates set forth in Governor Cuomo’s Police Reform and Reinvention Collaborative has been formed. The “Police Reform Initiative” can be reviewed at www.villageofquogueny.gov/polAnnouncements.cfm. Comments on the initiative and suggestions for the committee’s consideration can be sent to contact@villageofquogueny.gov.  

The Mayor also addressed in this week’s email an array of guidelines and beginning dates for lower-risk and higher-risk school sponsored sports; attempting to decipher this information gave At Quaquanantuck a brain cramp. Noting the amount of confusion among students, parents, and the general public about how, when, or if schools will be opening this fall, Hizzoner seized the opportunity to salute, and express tremendous gratitude to the “very able and dedicated” Quogue School Superintendent Jeff Ryvicker, whose job it is to sort out all of these issues safely and responsibly. At Quaquanantuck concurs wholeheartedly with the Mayor’s sentiments. 

For those who are not yet on the Village’s email address list, the easiest way  to see the most current, and all the Mayor’s letters, is to go to www.villageofquogueny.gov and click on Announcements. Once again, to receive Hizzoner’s email blasts, send an email to ABuhl@villageofquogueny.gov and ask to be put on the email list.

RC Timing
Timing is everything. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Postmaster Yaira Rodriguez Moving On after 21 Years of Service
Perhaps the most significant news item in either of the most recent email blasts from the Mayor is the announcement that Postmaster Yaira Rodriguez, who has been in charge of the U.S. Post Office in Quogue for the past 21½ years, will be leaving Quogue to take over the postmaster’s position in Holtsville, significantly closer to her home, likely by next week. 

Ms. Rodriguez’s record of dedicated service during her tenure as postmaster is beyond impressive. Residents who moved to Quogue or purchased homes here in the last 20 years have never seen anyone else in the post. Longtime residents of Quogue who were children when Ms. Rodriguez stepped into the position now have children of their own. 

Bill Clinton was the U.S. President when she started in Quogue and she has served through the two terms of George W. Bush, two terms of Barack Obama, and four years of Donald Trump’s presidency. Twenty-one Christmas seasons and attendant holiday card and parcel panic attacks; 21 IRS income tax deadlines; millions of pieces of mail; mountains and mountains and more mountains of recycling junk mail. Twenty-one years of adapting to the massive, Bay of Fundy ebb and flow of seasonal population. 

Through it all, she has consistently gone above and beyond the requirements of her job description in her efforts to help Quogue residents with any and all issues related to sending and receiving their mail.

Yaira Rodriguez
Quogue Postmaster Yaira Rodriguez. —A. Botsford Photo

Then came Covid-19. If there can be said to be degrees of “essential,” the Post Office—the crucial circulatory system of our nation, lately rendered slightly anemic by electronic mail and private shipping services—became even more essential than anyone could have imagined once the word came down to shelter in place and stay at home.

The village population swelled to almost summer levels, with many new renters trying to establish a mailing address in Quogue for the first time. Packages mailed to General Delivery filled the back of the building, while boxholders struggled to adapt to safety protocols by ordering needed supplies online and unavoidably further clogging delivery lines. All too often, Ms. Rodriguez and her staff were on the receiving end of the abrasive release of pent up frustrations on the part of impatient postal patrons. They never buckled, never snapped. 

Instead, following the postmaster’s lead, they stepped up, as they always have, to keep the mail moving. Typically with a smile. 

The timing of Ms. Rodriguez’s job change was propitious. She said in a brief interview this week that she was notified of her assignment to be the Holtsville postmaster on July 31. On August 6, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy instituted a management hiring freeze, which Ms. Rodriguez said means that the postmaster vacancy opening in Quogue with her departure—and any other postmaster vacancies across the country—will not be filled until sometime in the future, presumably after the major reorganization that Mr. DeJoy announced at the same time as the hiring freeze. 

Ms. Rodriguez said that instead of appointing a new postmaster for Quogue, the USPS will assign an “officer in charge” of the village post office to take over when she leaves, which she said “should be next week sometime.”

At Quaquanantuck salutes Ms. Rodriguez, and all the USPS staffers who keep our Post Office running smoothly, no matter what the challenges. It is hoped that all village residents will stop by to thank the departing postmaster for her years of truly dedicated service and wish her well in her new position. There are only a few days left to do so, apparently, so it might mean waiting on line with your mask on. Considering her record, her willingness, and all the help she has given to countless local postal patrons over the years, it doesn’t seem like a lot to ask.

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Moonflower. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

 QWR Full Moon Night Hike September 1; Private Group Paddling September 2
Returning to the realm of the actual for about 90 minutes, the Quogue Wildlife Refuge will host a Full Moon Night Hike social distance program on Tuesday, September 1, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. QWR full moon

During the walk through the forest up to North Pond and back, adults and families with children age 11 and up—wearing the requisite masks/face coverings—will look and listen for nocturnal creatures and undertake some night vision activities under the light of September’s Full Corn Moon. 

This program is $5 for Wildlife Refuge members; $10 for non-members, due at the time of registration. Reservations, by telephone (631-653-4771) or online by clicking here, are required at least 24 hours in advance. 

On Wednesday, September 2, the QWR will offer another social distance program in the realm of the actual with a reprise of this summer’s Private Group Paddle Day. Family-Paddle-Day-400x300

Groups, households and families are invited to register for one of three private time slots (10:30 to noon; 12:30 to 2; or 2:15 to 3:45) to enjoy exploring Old Ice Pond via kayak or canoe. Each group will be partially guided by a naturalist, allowing some time to free paddle. 

Paddlers will have a chance to observe the various species of freshwater fish, turtles, and birds that live in and around this 100+ year old pond originally created for ice harvesting for the Quogue Ice Company. A scavenger hunt/ID chart will be available. This program will be weather dependent.

Families/households/groups must pre-register and pre-pay the $250 fee, which covers up to six people ($50 for each additional person). Single kayaks, double kayaks, and canoes will be determined prior to each group’s arrival based on the individuals in the party. 

For more information about the program and to register, visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org or call 631-653-4771. 

To make donations to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. You can also use the QWR “text to donate” app for smart phone users; simply by text QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a simple donation form, right on their cell phones.


The younger cast of the Quogue Junior Theater Troupe put the finishing touches on their production of “We’re All in This Together” in rehearsals this week. Clockwise from left: the full cast wearing special QJTT t-shirts; the boys perfect their dance routine for a number from “Spamalot”; the girls scrub the floor for “It’s a Hard-Knock Life” from “Annie.” —Sue Prior Photos


Quogue Library Wraps Virtual Program on Classical Music
This summer’s newly retitled “Intro to Classical Music” series continues with the third and final  installment on Saturday, August 29, at 4 p.m.: “Can You Keep a Secret?: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6.”

Tchaikovsky
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

The three lectures of the virtual series were designed for those who might be less familiar with opera and classical music but would like to know more. Everyone logging in for the virtual program will get an inside look from the maestro’s perspective, while conducting along with an animated orchestra.

To register for this program, email info@quoguelibrary.org and request the Zoom login information. 

The next Zoom discussions of the newly formed Anti-Racism Book Club will be held on Tuesday, September 8, and Tuesday, September 22, at 7:30 p.m. The discussions will focus on the book “How to Be an Anti-Racist” by Ibram X. Kendi.

To register for Quogue Library virtual programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration. Clicking on the “I Hate Classical Music” flier will direct you to email info@quoguelibrary.org.   

“Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” at Quogue Gallery
On view until September 30, “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings,” featuring 23 new paintings by the artist, is the final show of summer 2020 at the Quogue Gallery. 

“Many of Healy’s paintings are abstractions of shore scenes, being places that have evoked particular moods and feelings in the artist,” notes Peter Hastings Falk, Chief Curator and Editor of Discoveries in American Art. “And it is those feelings that he so effectively materializes with mediums ranging from oil, watercolor, encaustic, oil crayon, lacquers, and colored pencil applied to fragments of canvas, boards, and paper.”

Quogue Gallery is at 44 Quogue Street, Quogue, NY 11959. Quoguegallery.com. For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com.

Reverend Canon Michael Ambler Leads Atonement Virtual Service 
The Reverend Canon Michael Ambler will officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, August 30, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com.

Rev Michael Ambler lg
The Reverend Canon Michael Ambler

Reverend Ambler, who often visits with family in Quogue, is Canon to the Ordinary Diocese of Maine in Portland and is the former Rector of Grace Church in Bath, Maine. 

A member of the choir and an acolyte at the Church of the Atonement as a child, he earned his Master of Divinity degree from Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, MA. He and his wife, Darreby, have three children: one son, Michael III, is a political campaign consultant; their son John works for TIST, an international development and conservation company; and their daughter Elizabeth (Elle is a recent graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to go to www.quoguechurch.org for the Zoom link or send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Moving On from Machu Picchu, Moley Envisions New Water Feature
Longtime readers of this column may remember a few years back when Quogue Quips film auteur and local visionary Roger Moley decided to remake his yard in the image of the 15th century Inca citadel Machu Picchu. 

Inspired by a visit to the site in southern Peru with his family, and weary of the flatness of eastern Long Island, he prepared to undertake one of the largest earth moving and giant stone masonry projects in history in order to achieve on only a slightly smaller scale an approximation of the 7,970 foot mountain ridge and the mysterious ancient structures positioned near the summit. When he realized how long the work would take, however, and how much it would disrupt the tranquility of his neighborhood, he willingly abandoned his dream for the sake of the community.

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Rainbow over Quogue. —Roger Moley Photo

 Readers will no doubt be happy to learn that Roger’s visionary spirit is still alive and well, though, thanks to the inspiration he received from the photo above he took recently of a rainbow near his home. Since he has always considered a residence in Quogue to be the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, he began investigating the physics of maintaining a rainbow over his house full time. 

His research indicated that full-time rainbows are typically only seen in the vicinity of large scale waterfalls, and that gave him the idea for creating a substantial water feature in his backyard. Roger is currently looking into ways to reroute and recirculate millions of gallons of fresh water daily from the Pine Barrens aquifer into his planned waterfall.

Moley Falls
Artist’s rendering of Roger Moley’s planned water feature for his backyard in the village.

 Once he works out the details of the design—and the engineering of significantly varying the elevation of his property—he expects that round-the-clock work on the new project should be completed by sometime in 2023. And while he has conceded that, like the Machu Picchu project, building the new water feature will require clearing some hurdles with the Zoning Board of Appeals, and will inevitably disturb some of his neighbors, he believes any unhappiness will evaporate when the community gasps with wonder at the majesty of Moley Falls, and the perpetual rainbow and beacon of hope glowing in the sky above it. 

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

Contributions Welcome
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Acts of Faith

It was a simple act of faith. It was one of the most inspiring things I have seen in Quogue in quite awhile. 

Anyone parsing the panoply of blessings that define life in our village would have to pay heed to the abundant evidence of simple acts of faith—and simple acts of soldiering on and restoring faith—that knit together the fabric of this remarkable community.

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Sea flat. —A. Botsford Photo

 Thanks to the coronavirus, much of this evidence has moved into the virtual realm. For just one example, where once one could see cars lining Quogue Street on Sunday mornings in front of the Church of the Atonement, now visiting preachers lead prayers for the faithful in Zoom meetings replete with traditional music  courtesy of undaunted organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler and the church’s Zoom coordinator, Schuyler Rowe. 

Physical evidence abounds up and down Jessup Avenue, where the Quogue Historical Society soldiers on by providing paper maps for self-guided walking tours of the diminutive but buzzing business district. The complete makeover of the Quogue Market into a more welcoming space represents a major commitment to the community that is unquestionably an act of faith. 

From Beth’s Cafe and the Quogue Gallery on Quogue Street to Flowers by Rori, the temporary headquarters of the Quogue Library and the Post Office on Midland—and all the shops and businesses in between: Double Rainbow, Quogue Liquors, Homespun, the Quogue Shops, Jen Going Interiors, Big Buddha Yoga and Barre, and Blown Away Hair Salon—just opening their doors for business can be seen as a simple act of faith during this pandemic. But beyond that, the level of customer service they offer goes beyond gratitude to their clientele; it speaks to their faith in the healing and connecting power of kindness, staying positive and doing the right thing. 

All the people who continue to support the groups and organizations that are now restricted by pandemic protocols from safely fulfilling their missions or even undertaking their traditional fundraising events are making their own acts of faith. With donations large and small—to the Quogue Volunteer Fire Department, Quogue Wildlife Refuge, the Police Benevolent Association, Quogue Historical Society, Hampton Theatre Company, Quogue Library, Quogue Junior Theater Troupe, Quogue Chamber Music, the Quogue Association and others—they are taking personal responsibility for doing their part to nurture and protect the soul of our community.

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Tranquility bay. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

What I witnessed, though, was a personal act of faith. Driving down Ocean Avenue, I saw a car pulled over with flashers blinking and a man on his knees beside it. I slowed down as I approached, thinking I would stop to see if he was alright or needed help. But as I passed, he stood up and I could see he had laid a prayer rug on the grass, with his smart phone in the middle of it. 

Perhaps he used the compass on his phone to orient the rug toward the east and Mecca. Driving down the road, I glanced in the rear view and saw him kneeling and touching his forehead to the ground. I’m not sure of all the reasons why, but seeing that man in the afternoon light stopped on the side of the road to pray made me feel better somehow, more hopeful. 

I know he wasn’t doing anything for my benefit, but I was grateful that I was able to witness a man, just one man I didn’t know, whose faith dictated that he stop whatever he was doing and take the time to pray. On Ocean Avenue. In Quogue. It opened up our community. I hope he felt safe. 

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.   

Open House Art Show Saturday Benefits Wildlife Refuge
Artist Steve Alpert and his wife Dorothy are hosting an open house art exhibition titled “Desire” on Saturday, August 22, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., with 20 percent of proceeds from any sales going to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. Rain date for the outdoor exhibition at 29 Old Main Road in Quogue, at which all coronavirus protocols will be observed, is Sunday, August 23, also from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Steve Alpert, “Between Us,” Oil on canvas, 30 by 40 inches. —Image courtesy of the artist

According to a release, the outdoor exhibition will feature “oil paintings such as ‘Desire,’ which was inspired by a trip to the Amazon region in Peru, and recalls Claude Monet’s Water Lilies cycle.” Also on display will be more recent works, such as “Duck,” “Summer Sun,” and “At Rest,” paintings  that “capture the magnificence and uniqueness of the East End’s landscapes.” 

Mr. Alpert continues to pay tribute to the men and women who serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. His latest initiative is “Proudly She Served,” a series of large portraits honoring “active duty military and veteran women who exemplify courage, strength, and selfless service, and who inspire the generations of young women following them,” according to the artist’s dedicated website for the project. (www.proudlysheserved.com

Meanwhile, partly in response to the global disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the artist  has “turned his attention to where he began: nature,” according to the release. 

The artist explained his idea of dedicating funds to the Wildlife Refuge this way: “We are a short walk to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge and have enjoyed its unique year-round splendor” ever since he and his wife moved here some 20 years ago, the artist said. He noted that during these days of stay at home orders and quarantine, the Refuge has been “as much a sanctuary for people as the animals it protects.”

“Recognizing that this summer season is going to be difficult for many non-profit organizations that depend on special fundraising events to help meet their operating costs, and that a number of local art shows have been cancelled,” Mr. Alpert said, “it seemed a perfect fit to have an open house art exhibition at our home and commit to 20 percent of all sales to go to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge.”

SA Duck 12 x 36
Steve Alpert, “Duck,” Oil on canvas, 12 by 36 inches. —Image courtesy of the artist

To make donations directly to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. You can also use the QWR “text to donate” app for smart phone users. Donations can now be made from anywhere simply by texting QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a very simple donation form, right on their cell phones. 

Quogue Library Virtual Programs for Every Age and Interest
This summer’s newly retitled “Intro to Classical Music” series continues with a second installment on Saturday, August 22, at 4 p.m.: “It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s Mozart’s Symphony 40.”Mozart

The three installments of the series, offered on successive Saturdays in August at 4 p.m., offer lectures for those less familiar with opera and classical music. Everyone logging in for the virtual program will get an inside look from the maestro’s perspective, while conducting along with an animated orchestra.

The Saturday, August 29 installment at 4 p.m. will be “Can You Keep a Secret: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6.” To register for this program, email info@quoguelibrary.org and request the Zoom login information. 

The newly formed Anti-Racism Book Club will launch a Zoom discussion of a second book, “How to Be an Anti-Racist” in meetings scheduled at 7:30 p.m. on three Tuesdays: August 25, and September 8 and 22. 

Teens and Adults are invited to “Express Yourself!” on a live Zoom tour of Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center with educator Joyce Raimondo on Wednesday, August 26, at 4 p.m.  

To register for Quogue Library virtual programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration. Clicking on the “I Hate Classical Music” flier will direct you to email info@quoguelibrary.org.   

“Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” Opening at Quogue Gallery
On view until September 30, “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings,” featuring 23 new paintings by the artist, is the final show of summer 2020 at the Quogue Gallery.

QG Healey Watch Hill
Eugene Healy, “Watch Hill,” 2020, Mixed media on canvas, 25.75 x 38.75 in. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

 “Many of Healy’s paintings are abstractions of shore scenes, being places that have evoked particular moods and feelings in the artist,” notes Peter Hastings Falk, Chief Curator and Editor of Discoveries in American Art. “And it is those feelings that he so effectively materializes with mediums ranging from oil, watercolor, encaustic, oil crayon, lacquers, and colored pencil applied to fragments of canvas, boards, and paper. Often, one delights in the subtle addition of beach sand, fragments of printed fabrics, and even pieces of window screens.” 

Starting in 1967, the artist began a long exhibition record with art museums and galleries throughout the country. He has also served as a curator, beginning in the late 1970s when he conceived and organized the popular traveling exhibition, “American Vision,” which was launched at New York University. Later, he served as Director of the National Artists’Alliance, and as exhibition designer for the Yale Center for British Art. Healy earned a BFA from New York Institute of Technology in 1972. 

Quogue Gallery is at 44 Quogue Street, Quogue, NY 11959. Quoguegallery.com. For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com.

QA Marcia Chester LM
Marcia Bradley consults with the Quogue Gallery’s Chester Murray at the opening reception for “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings.” —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Spirited Competition for Golf Titles in All Brackets
PGA Golf Professional Richard Stucklen organized an array of tourneys for young and old to establish the club champions for this summer at the Quogue Field Club. 

Starting with the juniors, in the 7 to 8 age bracket, Lach McAuliffe was the winner and Hugh McAuliffe the runner up. Cole Durham was the winner and Nathan Koehler the runner up in the 9 to 10 bracket; Lach McCaghren was the winner and Miles Tamis the runner up in the 11 to 12. In the 13 to 16 division, Will McCarthy was the winner and Robert Moran the runner up.  

Next up was the Pinehurst tournament for Adults and Juniors, with a three-way tie for first in the 10 and under division: Cole Durham and Sean Barrett, Hugh and Jack Wylie, and Nathan and Jay Koehler. Chase and Keith Carter were the winners and Silas and Chris Warren the runners up in the 11 to 12 bracket. And Robert and Tom Moran bested runners up Jack and Eric Sartorius in a playoff in the 13 to 16 division. 

In the Ladies Club Championship, Caroline Harris Bond was the winner of the 9-Holers Flight and Anne Anthony was the runner up. This year’s Ladies Club Champion is Wendy McCarthy, and the runner up, established by a playoff against Frances Beatty Adler and Stefanie Beck, is Katy Barbatsuly.  

Men’s Club Championship finalists this year were Peter Prentis vs. Kip Allardt in the second flight; Gerry Keefe vs. Peter Schellbach in the first flight; and Dana Robinson vs. Jed McCarthy in the Senior Flight. This year’s Men’s Club Champion is Sean Barrett, who defeated runner up Clint Dewey in the finals.

QFC Golf Champs (2)
Men’s Club Champion golfer Sean Barrett and runner up Clint Dewey doffed their masks and faced the camera following the championship match at the Quogue Field Club. —Claudia Stucklen Photo

 In the recent Stableford tournament, meanwhile, Tom Moran and Peter Prentis tied for fourth; Evan Clark was third; Phoebe Erdman was the runner up; and the winner was Brady Tolan. 

Congratulations to all the champions and all the competitors!

The Reverend Zachary Thompson Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Church of the Atonement on Quogue Street is welcoming the Reverend Zachary Thompson to officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, August 23, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com.

Rev Zachary Thompson
Reverend Zachary Thompson

Reverend Thompson has been an Associate Rector at St. James’ Church in Manhattan since 2017 and is primarily responsible there for parish life, new member incorporation, and pastoral care. Prior to joining the St. James’staff, he served as an Associate Priest and as a Rector in Atlanta, GA, as well as Chaplain at Emory University. 

Originally from Princeton, NJ, he earned his Master of Divinity at Emory University and a Master of Sacred Theology at Sewanee: The University of the South. The Rev. Thompson’s wife, Amy, served as an elementary school educator for a decade in Atlanta, and is now the Director of Admissions at the Church of the Epiphany Day School on the Upper East Side. They have two young sons, Rowan and Ezra. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to go to www.quoguechurch.org for the Zoom link or send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

Contributions Welcome
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Debt of Gratitude

The Memorial Day observance honoring the men and women who gave up their lives in the service of our nation. The final production of the Hampton Theatre Company’s 2019-2020 season. Blockbuster professional fireworks extravaganzas to mark the Fourth of July.

The Wild Night for Wildlife fundraiser for the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. Gala benefit evenings for Stony Brook Southampton Hospital and East End Hospice, among other worthy causes. The Quogue Association Beach Party.

The Quogue Historical Society’s “Celebrate Art” party and Village Green art show. Live Quogue Junior Theater Troupe musicals at the Community Hall. The QA Duck Race. The season capping September concert presented by Quogue Chamber Music. The list goes on and on.

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Hot Dog morning. —A. Botsford Photo

It has been a summer of missing things, gatherings of every description that in the end all boil down to celebrations of community. Among those events most sorely missed is perhaps the most open-hearted celebration of community that we have: the annual Open House hosted by the volunteers of the Quogue Fire Department. 

As a mailer for the QFD pointed out, since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, department volunteers have been responding to twice the usual number of alarms, carefully adhering to safety protocols while doing their utmost, as ever, to protect our community. Required to complete more than 100 hours of training annually, the members of the department are residents volunteering to be on the front lines to respond to more than 200 types of calls 24 hours a day, seven days a week, all year long. 

Like other nonprofits, the QFD has launched its 2020 fund drive without the anchoring event of the early August Open House, which traditionally has primed the pump to start donations flowing. While firefighting expenses such as new tools, gear (PPE) and apparatus maintenance are covered by village taxes, money raised in the annual fund drive enable the QFD Fraternal Association to underwrite such community activities as the Halloween Ghost Parade, a visit from Santa Claus, the Easter Egg sweep, Memorial Day ceremonies, fire safety education programs, and the annual Open House. 

Some of the funds raised also go to support a modest life insurance policy and family scholarships for QFD volunteers, both of which represent added incentives in new member recruitment and volunteer retention. 

The final paragraph of the department’s mission statement says it all: “To inspire love of country, good citizenship, civic virtue and self-sacrifice, and to perpetuate the spirit which from the earliest days has stimulated volunteer firefighters in the rendering of service of the highest type in the protection of life and property from fire or other life threatening emergency, without the motivation of fee or reward.”

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Volunteers of the Quogue and Westhampton Beach Fire Department circa 1922. —Image courtesy of the Quogue Historical Society

In the end, we owe the volunteers of the Quogue Fire Department a tremendous debt of gratitude, not only for their service in protecting our lives and our property but also for their example of civic responsibility and showing us the true meaning of community spirit. 

If you received the department mailer, please consider enclosing a generous donation in the return envelope provided. Didn’t get or can’t find the QFD mailer? Make out a check and send it to Quogue Fire Department, PO Box 792, Quogue, NY 11959.

The department, which has an active Explorer Program for community teenagers 15 and up “to prepare the next generation of firefighters,” is always looking for new volunteers. To find out more or to sign up, write to the QFD at PO Box 792, call 631-653-4620, or go to www.quoguefiredepartment.org and click on Contact Us. 

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Rainbow over Quaquanantuck; August 12, 7:10 a.m. —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Cara Wall Is Final Guest in Library’s Author Series
Writer Cara Wall will be the fourth and final guest in the Quogue Library’s 2020 Conversations with the Author series on Sunday, August 16, at 5 p.m. 

Ms. Wall will read from her debut novel, “The Dearly Beloved,” before engaging in a conversation with At Quaquanantuck columnist Andrew Botsford. Following the discussion, there will be an opportunity for members of the Zoom audience to ask questions, relayed to the author by Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom. 

“The Dearly Beloved” has been characterized as a poignant meditation on faith and reason, marriage and children, and the ways we find meaning in our lives. The novel follows two couples through decades of love and friendship, jealousy and understanding, forgiveness and commitment. Against the backdrop of turbulent changes facing  New York city and their church’s congregation, the four protagonists forge improbable paths through their evolving relationships, each struggling with uncertainty, heartbreak, and joy.

Cara Wall
Cara Wall

Fifteen years in the making, “The Dearly Beloved” has been called “a gorgeous, wise, and provocative novel that is destined to become a classic.”

Cara Wall is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and Stanford University. While at Iowa, she taught fiction writing in the undergraduate creative writing department and as the founder and inaugural director of the Iowa Young Writers’ Studio; she has also taught middle school English and history. Her writing has been published by Glamour, Salon, and The San Francisco Chronicle. She lives in New York City with her family. 

Writing for Entertainment Weekly magazine, David Canfield wrote:“‘The Dearly Beloved’ is the best book about faith in recent memory.” 

The Kirkus starred review includes this assessment: “Writing with restrained lyricism, Wall’s debut … offers a kind of literary chamber music, combining the viewpoints of a quartet of characters across multiple decades and events. ”

And Mary Beth Keane, author of “Ask Again, Yes,” wrote: “When I began reading ‘The Dearly Beloved’ I braced for piety, worried it might be a book only a believer could appreciate. Instead, I found myself carried along by Cara Wall’s luminous prose, and then by these characters and their stories. I saw myself in their doubts, in their hopes. An expansive narrative that draws in fifty years and two marriages, this is a novel to settle in with, to read slowly. 

“It asks the biggest question: where can each of us find meaning in this life? There is no moralizing here, only empathy. When I arrived at the end I felt absolutely lifted by the spirit of the story.” Dearly Beloved

This year’s series has been organized by Quogue Library volunteer Ellen de Saint Phalle. Thanks to the generosity of this summer’s guest authors, participation in the 2020 Author Series programs is free; register at QuogueLibrary.org

All the authors’ books are available for sale at QuogueLibrary.org and at the library’s temporary location at 4 Midland Street during curbside service hours. A portion of the proceeds will support the library through the generosity of Bookhampton Bookstore. “The Dearly Beloved” can also be purchased by clicking here

Sunday’s Conversations with the Author program begins at 5 p.m. For more information, email Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom at jbloom@quoguelibrary.org.

Junior Theater Troupe Gets Creative for Covid Summer
The young musical theatre actors, singers, dancers and tech crew of the Quogue Junior Theater Troupe—along with the directors, designers, tech specialists, and producer and founder Sue Prior—got a lot of firsthand experience in the-show-must-go-on-no-matter-what tactical innovation this summer.

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Olivia Robins, Grace Gramins, Anne Huffines, and Mary Kate Logler in a number from “We’re All in This Together.”

Given the restrictions on large groups gathering indoors and social distancing requirements, the QJTT team first transformed the interior of the theater at the Quogue Community Hall into a studio space set up for filming culminating performances. 

The older cast rehearsed seven nights a week for five weeks, working with an original script created specifically for this summer by the two directors, Mickey Nugent and Chris McKee. Titled “We’re All in This Together,” the show features classic and new Broadway show tunes, with performance rights purchased by QJTT.

From left: Grace Gramins at the keyboard; the tech crew for “We’re All in This Together”; an energetic masked dance number.


Last week, the final performance was filmed over the course of one afternoon and evening. The footage is currently being edited and will be available this weekend for online viewing (with a code) by cast families and donors. After the season ends, DVDs will be available for cast families. 

QJTT founder Sue Prior was beyond gratified by the way everyone pulled together to make the show both safe and a success. “With a great deal of effort and prayers, we managed to pull it off,” she wrote in an email this week. “The cast and staff had a blast and everyone stayed safe and well. We want to extend special thanks to our Mayor and Trustees for allowing us to use the theater space wisely.”

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Cast and crew for QJTT’s “We’re All in This Together.” —All photos courtesy of Richard and Sue Prior

The younger cast, rehearsing over a seven week period, will be following in the older cast’s footsteps in a few weeks, presenting for filming a different show with the same title, “We’re All in This Together,” with script created by directors Chris Kelly and Chris McKee and Broadway music purchased in the same manner.

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Black-crowned night-heron stands a watch. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Quogue Library Virtual Programs for Every Age and Interest
On Friday, August 14, at 3 p.m. the Quogue Library, in association with the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, will host “Let’s Talk Hummingbirds.”ruby t hummingbird The family program will offer information about eastern Long Island’s local hummingbird species, the ruby-throated hummingbird, and offer tips on how to attract them to the backyard. Appropriate for children 8 and up, teens and adults, the program will include a PowerPoint presentation covering a variety of topics about these wondrous birds. 

A pair of Quogue co-authors, Liz Gold Somekh and Stacey Maslin, will read their new book, “Dachshund Days: Meet the Gang,” in a virtual presentation sponsored by the library on Wednesday, August 19, at 10 a.m.
Characterized by the library as “perfect for children and dog lovers,” the book recounts an adventure featuring four next door neighbor pups who won’t let a fence stop them from building a lasting friendship. 

This summer’s “I Hate Classical Music” series gets off to a strong start on Saturday, August 15, at 4 p.m. with “Fate Knocking: Exploring Beethoven’s 5th Symphony.”
The three installments of the “I Hate Classical Music” series, offered on successive Saturdays in August at 4 p.m., offer lectures for those less familiar with opera and classical music.

Ludwig van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven

Everyone logging in for the virtual program will get an inside look from the maestro’s perspective, while conducting along with an animated orchestra.
On August 22 at 4 p.m. the series will present “It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s Mozart’s Symphony 40.” To register, email info@quoguelibrary.org and request the Zoom login information. 

To register for Quogue Library virtual programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration. Clicking on the “I Hate Classical Music” flier will direct you to email info@quoguelibrary.org.  

“Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” Opening at Quogue Gallery
On view from August 14 to September 30, “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” will be the final show of summer 2020 at the Quogue Gallery. An opening reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday, August 15, for the exhibition, which features 23 new paintings by the artist. 

Peter Hastings Falk, Chief Curator and Editor of Discoveries in American Art, has this to say about Eugene Healy’s work: “Many of Healy’s paintings are abstractions of shore scenes, being places that have evoked particular moods and feelings in the artist. And it is those feelings that he so effectively materializes with mediums ranging from oil, watercolor, encaustic, oil crayon, lacquers, and colored pencil applied to fragments of canvas, boards, and paper. Often, one delights in the subtle addition of beach sand, fragments of printed fabrics, and even pieces of window screens. 

“These are musical arrangements. Yet what is generally not known about the artist is that in the process of capturing those feelings just right, he returns to each work, over and over, almost obsessively making changes until he is certain his expressions sing … Collage is a melody he first heard as a 13-year-old growing up in Brooklyn, where he was born in 1948. Among his early primary influences, he cites Matisse, Vermeer, Diebenkorn, Rauschenberg, Hoffman, and the Fauve painters.”

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Eugene Healy, “Middle Beach Road,” 2020, Mixed media on canvas, 40 x 32 in. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

Starting in 1967, the artist began a long exhibition record with art museums and galleries throughout the country. He has also served as a curator, beginning in the late 1970s when he conceived and organized the popular traveling exhibition, “American Vision,” which was launched at New York University. Later, he served as Director of the National Artists’Alliance, and as exhibition designer for the Yale Center for British Art. Healy earned a BFA from New York Institute of Technology in 1972. 

As regular readers of this column know, the mission of the Quogue Gallery is to present a program of artistic excellence by showcasing the work of prominent, mid-career and emerging artists in the modernist tradition. Its core focus is on discovering and exhibiting figurative and abstract expressionist painters who are recognized historically as well as those of great promise whose work has not received the attention and critical response it so richly deserves. 

Since its founding in 2014, the Quogue Gallery’s place in the modern and contemporary art world has been widely acknowledged by the press. The gallery has been featured in many publications, including the New York Times, Dan’s Paper, Beach Magazine, Hamptons Art Hub, Artnet News, Southampton Press, and others. The gallery has also received critical recognition in reviews published by Hamptons Art Hub, Artnet News and other outlets. 

Quogue Gallery is at 44 Quogue Street, Quogue, NY 11959. Quoguegallery.com. For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com.

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Midsummer magnolia. —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Tracking the White Horse

From time to time, At Quaquanantuck receives requests for more information about specific aspects of Quogue history or the historical narratives related to different local landmarks. On more than one occasion, for example, readers have asked about the white horse standing sentinel at the corner of Montauk Highway and Route 104, also known as Quogue Riverhead Road. 

How lucky are village residents that we have the exceptional resource of the Quogue Historical Society and its dedicated curator Julie Greene to turn to for the answers to questions like these?

For most area residents—even those who have reached what is euphemistically referred to as “a certain age”—it seems there has always been a white horse on that corner. Thus far in her research, Ms. Greene has not been able to determine exactly when the original horse was installed. But what she has learned about the history of the property where it holds court offers some clues. 

The house behind the horse on the corner property was built by the Griffin family circa 1800. In 1923, Marcus Griffin sold the house to the Fitch family. According to Ms. Greene, it’s not clear whether it was the Griffin family or the Fitch family that gave the house the name Illahee, which the namers took to mean “the Homestead.”

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The latest iteration of the white horse that has long been a landmark at the corner of Route 104 and Montauk Highway. —A. Botsford Photo

 Side note: Cursory research by At Quaquanantuck indicates that “illahee” does not appear to be a Shinnecock word, as one might imagine. According to Wikipedia, it “means earth or country in the Native language Chinuk Wawa” spoken by indigenous people in the Pacific Northwest. Today, Illahee is the name of an unincorporated community in Kitsap County in the state of Washington. 

In 1924, the Fitch family opened the house as an antique, gift, and tea shop. The tea room was discontinued but the antique show continued until 1953, when the Fitch family sold the house to John Nilsson. 

Based on her research so far, Ms. Greene believes the house continued as an antique shop under the name White Horse Antiques until 1986, when South Bay Auctions held an auction there prior to the next sale of the property. While the white horse that gave the business its name was on the corner at the time of the auction, it is not clear, as noted above, when it was first installed. 

Over the years, the white horse has been through a number of changes. At Quaquanantuck recalls that there was once a tradition of seniors graduating from Westhampton Beach High School “riding” the steed prior to commencement. Damage from the riders and the vagaries of seasonal weather over the years necessitated at least one substantial overhaul. The horse that stands on the corner today is a replacement for a previous iteration, which was apparently stolen, according to what Ms. Greene has been able to learn. 

Quogue Historical Society at Home
A reminder that the QHS has put up an online exhibition, “Through the Lens of George Bradford Brainerd: Quogue, ca. 1875,” consisting of images that Mr. Brainerd captured of Quogue in the mid-1870s. Taken together, the images document a portrait of the village’s early days, barely recognizable from the vantage point of today. quoguehistory.org/qhs-home-exhibitions-online.

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Circa 1875 view of Quogue Street (looking west) from Old Depot Road. —George Bradford Brainerd Photo courtesy of Quogue Historical Society

Enjoy walking? Interested in history? Download a Walking Tour Map of Historic Jessup Avenue from the quoguehistory.org website, or pick up a map outside the QHS Pond House. The map provides an authoritative guide for a socially distanced walk around what the QHS is calling “Quogue’s bustling commercial, cultural, and civic center.”

And remember, now is the time to create or renew your membership and increase your donation to the Quogue Historical Society. Click here or visit quoguehistory.org/support/financial-contributions/

After Isaias blew through the village last week, the QHS thoughtfully shared stories and details of the Great Hurricane of 1938. With fingers crossed, At Quaquanantuck is planning to publish the QHS account closer to the 82 anniversary of the storm known as the Long Island Express on September 21.

Steve Alpert Open House Art Show Benefits Wildlife Refuge
Artist Steve Alpert and his wife Dorothy are hosting an open house art exhibition titled “Desire” on Saturday, August 22, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., with 20 percent of proceeds from sales going to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. Rain date for the outdoor exhibition at 29 Old Main Road in Quogue, at which all coronavirus protocols will be observed, is Sunday, August 23, also from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Steve Alpert, “Silver Linings,” Oil on canvas, 40 x 78 in. —Image courtesy of the artist.

A press release on the “Desire” exhibition explained the show’s title this way: “Desire for the beauty of nature. Desire for a better world through philanthropy. These tenets are the foundation of all the work of nationally renowned painter Steve Alpert, from his contemporary military paintings to his abstract landscapes that rejoice in the wonder of nature.” 

According to the release, the outdoor exhibition will feature “oil paintings such as ‘Desire,’ which was inspired by a trip to the Amazon region in Peru, and recalls Claude Monet’s Water Lilies cycle.” Also on display will be more recent works, such as “Duck,” “Summer Sun,” and “At Rest,” paintings  that “capture the magnificence and uniqueness of the East End’s landscapes.” 

Just prior to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Mr. Alpert closed out his 30-year career as a TV producer/director in New York in order to turn his attention to his lifelong passion for painting. His particular focus in the beginning was on extolling the virtues of those who serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. Seven large paintings in the artist’s“Full Honors” series—based on his photographs of a full honors funeral ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery—have been on exhibition at the Pentagon for the last two years and are slated to hang there indefinitely.

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Artist Steve Alpert, his wife Dorothy, and the late Ray. —Linda Phillips Photo

In November 2003, following the crash of two Black Hawk helicopters over Northern Iraq, the artist initiated a series of paintings to honor the 17 soldiers lost in the crash. Proceeds from these works and others in his contemporary military oeuvre have gone to support veterans and their families. As an adjunct professor at Fordham University, Mr. Alpert teaches an art workshop for veterans as part of the Fordham Veteran’s Initiative.

Today, the artist is continuing to pay tribute to the men and women who serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. His latest initiative is “Proudly She Served,” a series of large portraits honoring “active duty military and veteran women who exemplify courage, strength, and selfless service, and who inspire the generations of young women following them,” according to the artist’s dedicated website for the project. (www.proudlysheserved.com

Meanwhile, partly in response to the global disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the artist  has “turned his attention to where he began: nature,” according to the release. 

Some 21 years ago, Mr. Alpert and his wife Dorothy came to Quogue, where they live on the east shore of Quantuck Creek. “We are a short walk to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge and have enjoyed its unique year-round splendor ever since,”the artist said, noting that during these days of stay at home orders and quarantine, the Refuge has been “as much a sanctuary for people as the animals it protects.”

“Recognizing that this summer season is going to be difficult for many non-profit organizations that depend on special fundraising events to help meet their operating costs, and that a number of local art shows have been cancelled,” Mr. Alpert said, “it seemed a perfect fit to have an open house art exhibition at our home and commit to 20 percent of all sales to go to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge.”

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Steve Alpert, “Desire,” Oil on canvas, 40 x 68 in. —Image courtesy of the artist

Rev. Robert Dannals Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Dr. Robert S. Dannals will officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, August 16, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Now in his 18th season at the Church of the Atonement, Rev. Dannals is Senior Associate Rector at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

Share Your News and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Final Warning

Too late for publication this week, At Quaquanantuck received the press release below from Lieutenant Daniel Hartman of the Quogue Village Police Department. The timeliness of the message and the warning embedded in it begged for immediate publication. 

The release, reprinted here in its entirety, is filled with sobering statistics. But perhaps the most important message for area residents—and especially younger drivers—can be found in Chief Christopher Isola’s conclusion: 

“‘During this enforcement blitz, officers will be out targeting and ticketing speeding drivers,’ said Chief Isola. ‘Our goal is to save lives, and we’re putting all drivers on alert: the posted speed limit IS THE LAW. No more warnings and no more excuses. When it comes to speeding: Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine.’”

Quogue Village Police Department
Launches Enforcement Blitz
During Statewide Speed Awareness Week Campaign
August 6-12, 2020

Christopher Isola, Chief of Police, today launched a speed enforcement blitz for the Village of Quogue as part of Speed Awareness Week, a statewide enforcement campaign organized by the NYS Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee. The intensified enforcement effort against speeding drivers underscores the severity of the problem, both locally and across the nation.

“Speeding translates to death on our roadways. It greatly reduces a driver’s ability to steer safely around another vehicle, a hazardous object, or an unexpected curve. Speeding drivers put themselves, their passengers and other drivers at tremendous risk,” said Chief Christopher Isola.

In 2018, the most recent year for which final data is available, speeding was a contributing factor in 26 percent of all traffic fatalities in the U.S. More than 9,300 people were killed in such crashes, according to figures from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).QVPD

In New York, NHTSA data shows that nearly one-third (29%) of the state’s 943 traffic fatalities in 2018 were caused by speeding. 274 people lost their lives and 1,984 were seriously injured in these preventable collisions. The number of fatal crashes caused by unsafe speed increases in New York during the summer months with the highest totals in June, July, August and September.

NHTSA says 3 in 10 Americans speed. These drivers are also more likely to engage in other risky behaviors, such as not wearing a seat belt, drinking and driving, or using a cell phone while driving. In New York in 2018: 40 percent of speeding drivers involved in fatal crashes were unbelted at the time of the collision, compared to 11 percent of non-speeding drivers; speeding drivers were also more likely to have been drinking (38% versus 21%) than those drivers who were not speeding.

“During the Speed Awareness Week blitz, from August 6-12, officers will intensify enforcement of posted speed limits in the Village of Quogue. We’ll stop and ticket anyone caught speeding—especially on Montauk Highway, Quogue Street, Dune Road, and Old County Road, where most of our speed-related crashes occur,” said Chief Isola.

Forty-two percent (116) of all speed-related traffic fatalities in New York in 2018 occurred on local roads—where the posted speed limits were 55 miles per hour or under. According to NHTSA, a crash on a road with a speed limit of 65 mph or greater is more than twice as likely to result in a fatality than a crash on a road with a speed limit of 45 or 50 mph and nearly five times as likely as a crash on a road with a speed limit of 40 mph or below. About 15 percent of the nation’s speeding-related fatalities occur on interstate highways each year.

A NHTSA research report, “Analysis of Speeding-Related Fatal Motor Vehicle Traffic Crashes,” shows that a major proportion of fatal, speeding-related single-vehicle crashes occur on rural roadways. NHTSA considers a crash speeding-related if the driver was charged with exceeding the posted speed limit or if the driver was driving too fast for conditions at the time.

According to NHTSA, the economic cost to society from speed-related crashes is $52 billion annually.

“During this enforcement blitz, officers will be out targeting and ticketing speeding drivers,” said Chief Isola. “Our goal is to save lives, and we’re putting all drivers on alert – the posted speed limit IS THE LAW. No more warnings and no more excuses. When it comes to speeding: Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine.”traffic stop

Culture vs. Covid-19

Once again the East End was spared the kind of catastrophic damage that hurricane force winds can inflict, receiving instead no more than a hard slap from Tropical Storm Isaias as it blew through on Tuesday of this week.

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Awaiting Isaias; Tuesday, August 4, 11:20 a.m. —A. Botsford Photo

And yet, if the sustained 40 mph winds and gusts to 60 mph that came and went in a matter of a few hours can yield as many power outages, downed trees, sundered arcing electric lines, and scattered heavy branches as were left behind in the wake of Isaias, it is yet another reminder of the vital importance of paying attention and staying on top of preparedness. 

Isaias was a warning shot across the bow, a glancing blow that punched above its weight. Consider that Hurricane Dorian last fall had three times its strength and lingered over the northern Bahamas for almost 24 hours, and take it seriously. This year’s tropical storm season has almost four months to go.

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Storm surf; Tuesday, August 4, 5:10 p.m. —A. Botsford Photo

Another Cultural Highlight Falls to the Coronavirus 
Historically at this time of year, patrons and music loving residents of the East End would be receiving an invitation right about now to whatever delightful concert Quogue Chamber Music had planned for September.

Unfortunately, historical norms are out the window this summer, and QCM’s September concert has become yet another cultural casualty of the coronavirus pandemic. This week’s email blast from Quogue Chamber Music delivered the dark news with at least a small beam of light appended: “As has been the case with major orchestras and other cultural institutions, we, too, have sadly had to cancel our September concert. We have booked the same group for next September, in the expectation that by then it will be safe to gather indoors again to enjoy live music.”

Ever hopeful, QCM explored the possibility of presenting an outdoor concert this summer, in lieu of using the Community Hall. That idea came to naught, however, due to current prohibitions against gatherings of more than 50 people, the expenses involved, the risk that the weather might not cooperate, acoustic challenges, and the very reasonable reluctance shared by many to attend any sort of gathering where the risk of infection far outweighs the reward, no matter how great that reward might be.

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Beachfront post Isaias. —Lynn Joyce Photo

 Generous support from patrons and a grant from the Huntington Arts Council enabled Quogue Chamber Music to schedule three spring performances for elementary school children in Hampton Bays, East Quogue and at the Quogue School. All three concerts had to be canceled, or at least postponed, when the schools were closed in March. The group is currently exploring ways to bring chamber music to young children virtually, working with the same group of young musicians who were supposed to perform live at the schools.

That’s the way things are in the world of arts and culture and across the board as our village, our nation, and the world struggle to come to terms with Covid-19 and all the attendant devastating fallout. Some non-profits—such as the Quogue Library, the Wildlife Refuge, and the Quogue Historical Society—have been able to adapt somewhat to virtual platforms to offer a rich (albeit necessarily limited) program of offerings in order to maintain an interactive, though diminished, public profile. 

Others—like Quogue Chamber Music, the Hampton Theatre Company, and the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, to name only a few—have identities and missions that depend for their very existence on engaging with live audiences, typically indoors and almost always numbering way more than 50 people.  

It is a huge credit to Quogue Village residents and the greater East End community that all the nonprofits dedicated to enriching the cultural experience of living here, as well as those delivering critically important human services—the hospitals in Southampton and Riverhead, East End Hospice, local food pantries—continue to receive steadfast support, even when the pandemic makes it challenging or downright impossible for them to fulfill their missions. 

So, a hearty cheer and a round of vigorous applause to all the nonprofits that are soldiering on in these difficult times, and to all the supporters who continue to stand by them and keep them going. There’s a lot to be learned from the commitment and generosity of spirit on both sides of this equation. 

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.

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This fallen tree stretched its cradle of power lines at the intersection of Beach Lane and Quogue Street. —A. Botsford Photo

Wildlife Refuge Program Today Is All About Bats
Probably still time to register for the Quogue Wildlife Refuge all-bats virtual program today, Thursday, August 6, at 4 p.m.

The 45-minute “Bats!” Zoom program for children and adults will be all about bats, including their anatomy and amazing physical adaptations, and the various lifestyles—swinging, studious, ascetic, to name only a few—of bats from all over the world, including Long Island, and their ecological importance to the planet.Bats 

The program will also detail some important ways to help local bats. The fee is $5 per family; register by clicking here, or go to www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, find the Events Calendar under Programs, and click on “Bats! (Virtual Program).” 

Please remember, too, that the Wildlife Refuge continues to struggle during the pandemic, like all the non-profits that create our special quality of life in Quogue. To make donations, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. 

All are also invited to try out the new Quogue Wildlife Refuge “text to donate” app for smart phone users. Donations to the QWR can now be made from anywhere simply by texting QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a very simple donation form, right on their cell phones. 

Fiona Davis Up Next in Library’s Author Series
The third installment of the 2020 Conversations with the Author series on Sunday, August 9, at 5 p.m. will feature Fiona Davis, author of, most recently, “The Lions of Fifth Avenue.” 

Ms. Davis, who has four other novels to her credit, will read from her work before engaging in a conversation with At Quaquanantuck columnist Andrew Botsford. Following the discussion, there will be an opportunity for members of the Zoom audience to ask questions, relayed to the author by Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom.

FionaDavisMedium_credit+Deborah+Feingold
Fiona Davis —Deborah Feingold Photo

A graduate of the College of William & Mary now based in New York City, Fiona Davis—like last Sunday’s author, Amy Poeppel—began her career as an actress, working on Broadway, Off-Broadway, and in regional theater. 

After earning her master’s degree at Columbia Journalism School, she fell in love with writing, switching from editor to freelance journalist before settling down to write historical fiction. Her previous novels are: “The Dollhouse”; “The Address”; “The Masterpiece”; “The Chelsea Girls,” all of which have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

Adriana Trigiani, New York Times bestselling author of “The Shoemaker’s Wife,” wrote that in the author’s latest novel, “The magnificent Fiona Davis has written a page turner for book lovers everywhere! I was on the edge of my seat as Laura Lyons, the ambitious essayist, breaks down social barriers and finds herself adrift in her own life at the end of the Belle Epoque in 1913 New York City.The+Lions+of+Fifth+Avenue

“Secrets are revealed eighty years later by her granddaughter, who found her way into the family business, working at the New York Public Library. This is a story of family ties, their lost dreams and the redemption that comes from discovering truth.”

The starred review in Publishers Weekly notes that “Davis delves into the history of the New York Public Library in this delightful mystery … The characters and story are stellar, but the real star of the show is the library, which Davis evokes beautifully.”

This year’s series has been organized by Quogue Library volunteer Ellen de Saint Phalle. Thanks to the generosity of this summer’s guest authors, participation in the 2020 Author Series programs is free and available by registering for each week’s program at QuogueLibrary.org

The authors’ books are available for sale at QuogueLibrary.org and at the library’s temporary location at 4 Midland Street during curbside service hours. A portion of the proceeds will support the library through the generosity of Bookhampton Bookstore. “The Lions of Fifth Avenue” can also be purchased by clicking here

The final author in this summer’s series will be Cara Wall, author of “The Dearly Beloved,” on Sunday, August 16. All Conversations with the Author programs begin at 5 p.m. 

For more information, email Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom at jbloom@quoguelibrary.org.

FPA Discussion Looks at U.S. versus Central America on Immigration
The Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program, sponsored by the Quogue Library and moderated this summer on Zoom by Susan Perkins and David Rowe, will tackle the issue of “U.S. Relations with the Northern Triangle”  at 5 p.m. on Saturday, August 8. To register, click here, or go to the Quogue Library website, www.quoguelibrary.org, and click on the Great Decisions flier on the home page. 

Combating illegal immigration has become a priority of the Trump administration. A special target of the administration is the Northern Triangle of Central America—Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala—which holds the nations responsible for the most populous flow of migrants from Latin America to the U.S. Migrants on the move

For many years, migrants have cited the lack of even subsistence economic opportunity in their home countries as the principal reason for trying to emigrate to the U.S. That’s why, historically, the U.S. has offered economic aid to countries in the Northern Triangle: to address the root cause of so many people trying to make their way to the U.S. in search of employment. 

After a short video on the subject, Saturday’s discussion will examine this challenging question: Now that funds from the U.S. have been cut, how can the Northern Triangle countries be expected to curtail migration? 

This year’s FPA Briefing Book is available for purchase in digital form from the FPA website, www.fpa.org, or by clicking here. The FPA website also has a complete list of topics for this year’s Great Decisions Discussions. 

The Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program provides background information and policy options for the eight most critical issues facing America each year, serving as the focal text for discussion groups across the country. For more information, visit www.fpa.org

Mercedes Matter Award for Artist Claudia Doring Baez
A painting by Quogue artist Claudia Doring Baez was recently selected by two noted New York City gallerists—Miles McEnry of McEnry Gallery and Gwenolee Zürcher of Zürcher Gallery—as the winner of a Mercedes Matter Award.

Claudia Doring Baez
Artist Claudia Doring Baez

The painting, titled “Brassaï, Paris—Gala At The Opera For Harper’s Bazaar 1935-37,”  is included in the New York Studio School Alumni Association’s “2020 Alumni Exhibition,” which has been extended on Artsy to August 30, 2020. The exhibition features works from every decade of the school’s history created by 216 alumni born between 1930 and 1993. 

Underscoring the significance of the annual alumni exhibition and the Mercedes Matter Awards, according to the school’s website, is the fact that one of its founding principles, espoused by both founding Dean Mercedes Matter and Dean Graham Nickson, was the understanding that it takes time and commitment for an artist to truly arrive at something significant. 

Other judges tasked with selecting this year’s Mercedes Matter Awards included Christine Berry from Berry Campbell, Paul Efstathiou from Hollis Taggart, and Catherine Bernath and Madeleine Mermall from Public Swim.

Gala Opera Claudia Doring Baez
Claudia Doring Baez, “Brassaï, Paris -Gala At The Opera For Harper’s Bazaar 1935-37,” 2020, Oil on canvas, 14 × 11 in. —Image courtesy of New York Studio School

Quogue Library Programs Crowd the Calendar
Even when limited to the virtual realm, August is still a busy time for Quogue Library programs. 

Exotic bugs, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals will all be part of the live animal show (on Zoom) on Friday, August 7, at 7 p.m., offered as part of the interactive virtual nature and science presentations of the Wildlife Diversity Series from the Center for Environmental Education & Discovery (CEED). 

Led by Ranger Eric Powers, the presentation will introduce his Animal Ambassadors and examine where in the world these creatures come from and the different special adaptations they have developed. 

The Adult Book Club meets on Zoom this Sunday, August 9, at noon to discuss “The Night Watchman” by Louise Erdich. 

The newly formed Anti-Racism Book Club will continue its Zoom discussion of “So You Want to Talk About Race” by Ijeoma Oluo in meetings at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, August 11, and Tuesday, August 25. 

On Friday, August 14, at 3 p.m. the library, in association with the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, will host “Let’s Talk Hummingbirds.” The family program will offer information about local hummingbird species and offer tips on how to attract them to the backyard. 

To register for any of these programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration.

RC Rising Tide
Rising tide. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Justice Court Update: Vehicle Break-In Case Adjourned to September 8
The arraignment of Oscar N. Mayen-Orrego of Riverhead, on charges stemming from multiple incidents of petit larceny and attempted petit larceny on June 22, has been postponed for a second time.  

Originally scheduled for Monday, July 6, the arraignment date was changed to August 3 due to Covid-19 restrictions on the use of the courtroom. The case has now been adjourned to Tuesday, September 8, at 9 a.m. in the Quogue Village Justice Court so that Mr. Mayen-Orrego can obtain legal representation. 

Although an arrest was made and arraignment is scheduled, the investigation is ongoing. A Quogue Village Police Detective is still actively working on the case, and additional charges may be brought forward, pending results on some evidence submissions made to the Suffolk County Lab. Anyone with any information about the case is asked to call 631-653-4791, or email DHartman@villageofquogueny.gov.

Meanwhile, a QVPD spokesman reiterated this week the advice issued previously that residents be sure, at minimum, to lock their vehicles and house doors (including basement access) at night.

Masks QG Udell LM
CLARIFICATION: A photo in last week’s At Quaquanantuck showed Quogue Gallery owners Chester and Christy Murray and artist Patricia Udell without their masks on, which at least one reader found disturbing. Since they were holding their masks in their hands, the caption should have made note that they had doffed the face coverings only momentarily for the photograph, thus perhaps reassuring anxious readers that the Quogue Gallery remains committed to practicing safe social distancing and other coronavirus protocols at all times. At Quaquanantuck regrets the oversight. —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Quogue Gallery’s Patricia Udell Exhibition On View through August 13
Art lovers have one more week to check out “Patricia Udell: Color, Space and the Female Form,” featuring the artist’s gouache paintings as well as her plaster reliefs, remains on view at the Quogue Gallery through August 13. .

The artist’s body of work explores color, space and the female form across a variety of media. She started with a series of small bronze sculptures exploring the female form before progressing beyond the figurative in favor of more abstracted examinations of shape, line and negative space in a series of monochromatic plaster reliefs and painted reliefs of corrugated cardboard and wood. 

The artist then progressed to a series of colorful, flat gouache paintings. In compositions that echo her sculpture, she blurs the distinction between form and negative space by assembling vibrant bands of color running up and down the paper in what she describes as a “back and forth” between gesture and positive and negative space. 

For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com

Sturgeon Moon GR
Sturgeon moon. —Ginny Rosenblatt Photo

Rev. Robert Dannals Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Dr. Robert S. Dannals will officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, August 9, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Now in his 18th season at the Church of the Atonement, Rev. Dannals is Senior Associate Rector at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

Reverend Dannals will officiate at the Atonement’s Morning Prayer services through Sunday, August 16.

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

Contributions Welcome
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.