Week 25

Here we are again: Labor Day, the traditional button on the end of the traditional summer season. 

But in more ways than can be easily counted or described, this has been anything but a traditional summer season. And just as, thanks to the pandemic, the so-called “season” started way early with thousands fleeing the city to shelter at houses on the East End, it looks like there is no clear end in sight for the 2020 summer season, traditional or otherwise.

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Atlantic moonrise. —A. Botsford Photo

 It seems somehow appropriate that Labor Day weekend coincides almost exactly with week 25 of the global siege of the coronavirus pandemic. Half a year, so far, of disruption, confusion, economic turmoil, cultural conflict and tragedy on a massive scale, along with millions of acts of heroism, courage and kindness, large and small, ingenuity, innovation and adaptation. More than 185,000 deaths, and counting, in the U.S. alone. 

Half a year of the brutally clear coronavirus X-ray revealing a terrifying and crippling number of fracture lines in all our institutions and our society. Even more daunting, as chaos gathers momentum like a tropical storm, and with the school year, the U.S. census, and the national election—among much—mired in a confusion of competing interests, there seems to be no clear way forward. 

The crossroads and convergent crises the world is facing in the sepulchral shadow of the pandemic are inescapable. Still, living inside the blessed bubble that is Quogue can make it possible to turn a blind eye, or to think that these are not our problems, these are issues for others who are affected to sort out. 

But make no mistake: as much as Covid-19 and all its repercussions represent a scourge of unfathomable proportions and an existential threat, it is also a test, perhaps the greatest test any of us will face in our lifetimes. It’s a test that we as a nation have been failing so far. As has been declared many times in this space and elsewhere, if we cannot find a way to pay close attention, to acknowledge that we as Americans are all in this together, and to work together with a unified set of values to bring some sense of order out of the chaos, we will continue to fail. 

So far, coming together in this way has seemed to be an insurmountable, too complicated challenge. The political, social, and cultural response to the pandemic has continually widened the gap and deepened the chasm between “us” and “them.” But when faced with a common foe of such magnitude it should be simple. Let’s put aside the arguments about whose values are correct, erase the lines in the sand, and soften the rigid positions. It’s not supposed to be us against them; that’s the path to self-destruction. It’s “We the people.”

Let’s not be us anymore. Let’s not be them. Let’s be we.

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.

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Departing storm. —Lynn Joyce Photo

Upside Down and Gone
Anecdotal evidence indicates that there are more than a few readers who don’t read all the way to the bottom of each week’s At Quaquanantuck. So, this week, in honor of Labor Day and the topsy-turvy world we find ourselves in these days (along with this columnist’s desire to do things differently), the column will be presented in almost reverse order from what readers have seen in recent weeks. 

Therefore, the first item is an announcement that might typically be more suitable at the end of a column: The At Quaquanantuck columnist is taking a two-week vacation after filing this week’s post. Readers can expect the next column on Thursday, September 24

The purpose of the vacation will be to rest and reflect on: how the column has evolved over the three plus years since I began posting it weekly for free; the ways the column and readership have changed during the 25 weeks, so far, of the pandemic and the initial stay at home and quarantine orders; and the purpose and intention of publishing weekly, up until now and going forward. 

Try not to miss the column too much, and please come back to read it again when it resumes. In the meantime, those readers who are feeling too bereft can always go to the website, AtQuaquanantuck.com, and scroll down through the archives to browse columns of the past.

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Still water. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Letter to the Editor ré: Moley Falls
An exciting development this week: At Quaquanantuck’s very first Letter to the Editor, running near the top of this week’s column because it refers to an item at the bottom of last week’s post. 

Editor’s note: Before perusing this communication, anyone who didn’t read to the end of last week’s column might want to scroll down to read the item referred to in the letter below, headlined: Moving On from Machu Picchu, Moley Envisions New Water Feature.  

To the editor: 

I would like to commend Mr. Botsford for drawing the Quogue community’s attention to my ongoing crusade to enhance the beauty of our outdoor living spaces, but feel compelled to correct some of his misrepresentations of my past work and future plans. 

I was indeed able to construct a reasonable facsimile of Machu Picchu, which I dubbed “Moley Picchu,” in our backyard, though Andrew may not have seen it since he has repeatedly turned down invitations to spend a quiet evening of reflection there. As for my yearning to add a rainbow during these trying times, I admit I contemplated tapping into the Pine Barrens aquifer for a personal waterfall to add to (not replace) Moley Picchu, but soon discovered that the concrete aqueducts I sought as a means to bring water to Moley Falls required variances that the Zoning Board would not approve. 

I also came to recognize that the use of millions of gallons of water for such an endeavor was as wasteful as it was expensive. So, just as I made compromises on the scale and scope of Moley Picchu, I looked for some innovative, low-cost solutions to achieve my more recent dream. After learning (sadly) that Fountains of Wayne in New Jersey was no longer in business, I contacted Lexi at Mike’s Fountainry (555 Second Avenue, Lindenhurst) about adapting the water-pump feature in their porcelain fountains for an environmentally friendly faux waterfall. Boy, did I save thousands – and the Zoning Board had no objections! However, that didn’t solve my rainbow issue, as the waterfall isn’t nearly powerful enough to spray out sufficient water droplets to cause a full-spectrum refraction. 

So I went on Amazon and took a chance on an “LED Rainbow Projector” that cost me—get this!—$15.99 (the decimal point is correct, folks!). And though the Zoning Board has balked at my projecting the rainbow at night (and really, have you ever seen a nighttime rainbow?), I’ve been able to get approval to enjoy it from dawn to dusk. We’re still putting on the finishing touches (including a pair of vintage bathtubs I bought from a guy who worked on a Quialis shoot), but I’m excited to share my landscape architect’s rendering of how the completed project will look. Faithfully, Roger Moley

Moley Pichu
Landscape architect’s rendering of planned addition to Moley Picchu. —Image courtesy of Roger Moley

The Reverend Stephen Setzer Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Stephen Setzer will officiate virtually at this summer’s final Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, September 6, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Born and raised in the hills of Western North Carolina and the son of a Baptist preacher, Reverend Setzer acknowledges on his website that he “spent so much time in church that it could be said, ‘That boy cut his teeth on a church pew!’” From childhood through college he spent the bulk of his time in Baptist churches and institutions, and it wasn’t until he was in his early 20s that he discovered the Episcopal Church while studying theology at Dallas Theological Seminary. 

“I wandered into a beautiful Episcopal parish called Church of The Incarnation,” he notes on his website, “and my life has never been the same. Since then I have had the privilege to work, serve, and study in diverse places, both international and domestic.”

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The Reverend Stephen Setzer

He earned his certificate of graduate studies at Dallas Theological Seminary in 2010 and his Master of Divinity degree in 2013 at Wycliffe College, University of Toronto. He is currently pursuing further studies toward his Doctor of Ministry degree at Fuller University. 

Ordained in 2013, Reverend Setzer began his ministry at the Cathedral Church of St. Matthew in Dallas. In 2015 he and his wife, Yoana, moved to Wilmington, Delaware, to serve as associate rector at Christ Church Christiana Hundred. Last year they moved again, this time to Manhattan, where Yoana now works as an attorney at Kirkland and Ellis, and Reverend Setzer works at a technology startup while also launching a new project, SacrdSociety, which seeks to help individuals and churches create new forms of community in a post-COVID world. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to go to www.quoguechurch.org for the Zoom link or send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com.


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Above, dancers in the Quogue Junior Theater Troupe younger show of “We’re All in This Together” tapping a number from “42nd Street.”  Below, left to right, Chloe McAuliffe playing Sue Prior, Luke Williamson playing Andrew Cuomo, and Eva Bramwell playing CBS Television reporter Jennifer McLogan. 
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The full cast knocks out “Tomorrow” from “Annie.” Under this year’s format, the show was filmed on Saturday, August 29, for viewing on different platforms and on DVD at a later date.—Sue Prior Photos

Foreign Policy Association Looks at “China’s Road into Latin America”
The Foreign Policy Association (FPA) Great Decisions Discussion program, sponsored by the Quogue Library and moderated this summer on Zoom by Susan Perkins and David Rowe, will tackle the issue of “China’s Road into Latin America”  at 5 p.m. on Saturday, September 12. To register, click here, or go to the Quogue Library website, www.quoguelibrary.org, and click on the Great Decisions flier on the home page. Latin America China

The FPA 2020 April update provides the detailed context for the upcoming discussion. During the COVID-19 pandemic, China quickly moved to strike deals with many of the nations of Latin America to provide medical supplies and other goods to help combat the spread of the virus on the continent. In addition to protective health gear for doctors, testing kits and ventilation masks, China has also promised large donations to these nations to ease some of the economic difficulties caused by the virus. 

China has sought to focus attention on its international response and recovery, rather than on Wuhan having been the initial epicenter of the virus. “It’s remarkable and a credit, in a way, to China’s own commanding control of information,” said Margaret Myers, “that it’s been able to re-envision itself as a leader in the fight against coronavirus globally.” Ms. Myers is the author of “China in Latin America” in Great Decisions 2020.China Latin America

COVID-19 has already had a drastic effect on life in Latin America, despite not having as many confirmed cases as Europe or the United States. Major slowdowns in trade, especially that of crude oil, have done a lot of damage to the economies there. Goldman Sachs recently adjusted its projections for the Latin America region saying that economic growth, which was projected at +1.1 percent, will drop to -1.2 percent due to COVID-19. In addition to the economic problems, political protests in Chile, ongoing since October of 2019 in the large Plaza Italia in Santiago, have been forbidden because all large gatherings now require permission from the government.

Meanwhile, not all relationships between China and Latin America remain strong. The relationship between China and Brazil has been fraught since the election of Jair Bolsonaro, who espoused anti-Chinese views when he was running for office. Since the outbreak of COVID-19, Bolsonaro and members of his staff have traded barbs with Chinese officials. 

Brazil’s Education Minister Abraham Weintraub has suggested that China is using the COVID-19 outbreak and response to make a profit. Chinese officials have vehemently denied these rumors and have said that these actions have “caused negative influences in the healthy development of bilateral relations.” Still, despite Jair Bolsonaro’s plan to move away from Chinese influence, China remains Brazil’s largest trading partner.Sino Latino Americano

As the Trump administration continues to withdraw from the world stage, China is looking to fill the void. After a short video on the subject, the September 12 discussion will examine these challenging questions: How does Latin America fit into China’s “One Belt, One Road” plan? How will the relationship with China affect the region? Should the U.S. be concerned about China’s growing “sphere of influence”? 

The FPA’s list of recommended readings on the topic includes: 

Garrison, Cassandra. “With U.S. hit by the virus, China courts Latin America with medical diplomacy.” Reuters, March 26, 2020. www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus

Simoes, Eduardo. “Brazil-China Diplomatic Spat Escalates over Coronavirus Supplies.” U.S. News & World Report, April 6, 2020. www.usnews.com/news/world/articles/2020-04-06/brazil-china

Call, Charles T. “As coronavirus hits Latin America, expect serious and enduring effects.” Brookings, March 26, 2020. www.brookings.edu/blog/order-from-chaos/2020/03/26

This year’s FPA Briefing Book is available for purchase in digital form from the FPA website, www.fpa.org, or by clicking here. The FPA website also has a complete list of topics for this year’s Great Decisions Discussions. 

The Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program provides background information and policy options for the eight most critical issues facing America each year, serving as the focal text for discussion groups across the country. For more information, visit www.fpa.org.

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Quogo Neck sunset. —Stefanie Beck Photo

Remembering Ambrose A. Carr Jr.
Longtime Quogue resident Ambrose A. (Amby) Carr Jr., a man of deep Catholic faith and tremendous love for his family and friends, died on August 29. He was 89.

Before his family bought a house in Quogue in 1937, as a child he summered here with his family in the large inns along Quogue Street. 

Born in Brooklyn on May 26, 1931, he moved later in life to Manhasset to raise his family. He was educated at Brooklyn Preparatory High School, College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA,  and New York University Graduate School of Business. His family said that he always regretted not being able to serve in the military because of his color blindness. 

Mr. Carr worked at IBM for 33 years in the New York area, predominantly in Sales and Marketing. His last position with IBM was as the Director of Industry Relations in Corporate. After retiring in 1988, he volunteered for an organization called Morality in Media. 

Known to have many interests and enthusiasms, he was a Renaissance man of sorts, as seen in his study and enjoyment of music, languages, mathematics, and theology. He enjoyed taking his family skiing in Vermont, so much so that he skied until he was 83; one of his favorite pastimes was teaching the young folks how to ski. 

He also enjoyed racing one-design sailboats at Manhasset Bay Yacht Club and Sunfish at Shinnecock Yacht Club (SYC), where he served as Commodore in the 1970s. In the 1960s he accomplished the major sailing feat of racing in the world-renowned Bermuda Race. He also enjoyed playing tennis at the Quogue Field Club and participating in the club championship tourneys. In retirement, he learned to play golf, his family said, and approached it “with ardor and enthusiasm.” 

Mr. Carr’s contributions to the Quogue community included serving on the Planning Board for many years in the early 2000s and as the President of the Quogue Beach Club for 13 years, from 1991 to 2003. His love for Quogue and its community and traditions ran deep, family members said, but most importantly he loved it as “the perfect place to gather his family around him.” 

At age 79 he completed the Camino de Santiago in the north of Spain, the 490-mile pilgrimage walk from the foothills of the Pyrenees to the Cathedral of St. James in Santiago de Compostela. Dedicating the trip to the memory of his late wife, he completed the Camino in six trips covering five years. He planned the trip himself, his family said, and invited friends and family members to accompany him on “this wonderful journey of faith and perseverance.” 

“He exuded joy to all those around him, even to the end,” his family said, noting that “Amby’s glistening eyes—which are a window to his soul—his love of life and his warmth and wit will be sorely missed. We hope that his example of faith and character will abide with us.”

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Ambrose A. Carr Jr.

Invited by Amby’s daughter Margot to share some thoughts, friend and neighbor Roger Rosenblatt wrote: 

“The day Nancy died, Amby walked across the lawns of our adjacent homes to tell me. His eyes were a mixture of sadness and surprise, as if to say, “How could this be?” So Amby dies now, and I wonder less how his death could be than how the world could ever have known so sweet a man. 

“To say that someone is sweet may sound like an excuse for a lack of other, more robust qualities. But Amby had them all in abundance: a high spirit, a high intelligence, generosity, tact, courage, humane decency, thoughtfulness, horse sense, a tireless work ethic, and a spry and gentle humor. It’s just that so few men are sweet—and gentle, and tender—that when one finds those virtues in a friend, it’s a gift. When his fine mind was invaded by dementia some years ago, he retained his sweetness, and natural elegance. Only Amby could continue to play the perfect gentleman in the thrall of a corrosive disease. 

“We were friends, good friends. We laughed at the same things, took the same pleasure in jazz and pop music, enjoyed talking about boats and the sea, and were equally amused and appalled at the way Quogue governs itself. But we loved the Village with the same basic ardor.

“He was tickled, and a little embarrassed, that I once wrote of him as having the good looks of a 1930s leading man. But he did. Ronald Coleman. Lew Ayers. We saw eye to eye on most subjects, except God. Amby believed wholeheartedly, joyously. I believe, too, but with more wariness and less  affection. How gracefully he tried to change my mind. 

“In his honor, then, I’ll go this far today: Now Amby and God have each other’s company. I envy God.” 

Predeceased by his wife, Nancy, in 2004, he is survived by his daughter Paula Carr Cummings (Alexander) and their children (his grandchildren) Ian and Sophie; his daughter Margot Carr (Dana Robinson); and his son Ambrose A. Carr III (Elizabeth) and their children (his grandchildren) Maisie and Libby.

A wake will be held on Friday, September 4, from 3 to 5 p.m. at Werner & Rothwell Funeral Home in Westhampton Beach. A funeral mass will be held at the Immaculate Conception Church on Quiogue at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 5. Immediately following the funeral mass, all are invited to the interment at noon at the Quogue Cemetery. All attending the interment are asked to please bring a shell to place at Amby’s grave in honor of the completion of his “Camino,” as the symbol of the Camino is a scallop shell. 

Donations in honor of Ambrose Carr would be welcome at either caringkind, The Heart of Alzheimer’s Caregiving ( caringkindnyc.org) or Immaculate Conception Church of Westhampton Beach.

Morning mtg PPMorning meeting. —Paula Prentis Photo

Quogue Library Offers a Season without End in Virtual Realm
Lots of offerings from the Quogue Library between now and when At Quaquanantuck returns on September 24. Always a good idea to check the library website to see what’s coming up. 

For exercise programs: Chair Yoga with Jillian on Mondays at 4 p.m.; Pilates on Mondays at 10 a.m. and Sculpting and Cardio on Tuesdays at 10 a.m., both with instructor Leisa DeCarlo; and Yoga with Jillian on Fridays at 10 a.m. 

A Zoom program on “Caring for Yourself in Stressful Times” with Cornell Cooperative aimed at parents and families will be offered on Wednesday, September 9, at 4:30 p.m. 

In the Career Workshop category, a career coaching session with consultant Constance Hallinan Lagan will be offered on Tuesday, September 15 at 6:30 p.m. Titled “Thanks for the Pink Slip: The Upside of Being Downsized, Fired, Let Go, Laid Off, Eliminated, Terminated, Etc.,” this Zoom seminar aims to prepare participants for success even if they have “lost” their jobs. 

Ms. Hallinan will also lead another Career Workshop, this one on “Resumé Writing,” on Tuesday, September 22, at 6:30 p.m. 

Movie lovers and cinema buffs will no doubt enjoy a program on “The Golden Age of Hollywood: From the late 1920s through the end of World War II” presented by Brian Rose on Friday, September 18, at 7 p.m.

The next volume to be discussed by the Adult Book Club will be “The Girl With the Louding Voice” by Abe Dare on Sunday, September 13, at noon. 

And the next Zoom discussions of the newly formed Anti-Racism Book Club will be held on Tuesday, September 8, and Tuesday, September 22, at 7:30 p.m. The discussions will focus on the book “How to Be an Anti-Racist” by Ibram X. Kendi.

On Sunday, September 20, at 3 p.m. Quogue Wildlife Refuge Environmental Educator Tony Valderrama will lead a workshop in making “Owl Nature Prints.” Participants will learn about the fascinating nocturnal raptors native to Long Island and create owl print art using a potato or apple cut in half.

For complete details on these and other programs offered by the library, visit the library’s home page at www.quoguelibrary.org or send an email to info@quoguelibrary.org. To register for Quogue Library virtual programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration.

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Card Shark. The creators of the sharks put on display around the Village business district as part of the Quogue Library’s first annual Shark Week are reminded that the wooden replicas will be taken down on Friday, September 4, and placed on the side of the Midland library outpost for pickup. Sharks not collected by Tuesday, September 8, will be discarded. —Ginny Rosenblatt Photo

Wildlife Refuge Continues Outdoor Social Distance Yoga Program
Amy Hess will continue to offer “Earth Yoga Outside” in a socially distanced format at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesdays in September. 

The one-hour class is held in a large outdoor space on woodchips overlooking the pond. Participants are asked to bring a sheet or blanket and as well as a yoga mat. Because the class is outdoors, participants should consider applying sunscreen and insect repellent and should dress appropriately for the meteorological conditions. 

The Wednesday outdoor sessions are currently limited to nine people, and the fee is $15 per class. Class is weather-permitting and registrants will be refunded if class is cancelled. Pre-registration and pre-payment is required; register here or go to www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, find the Events Calendar under Programs, and click on Earth Yoga Outside. For more information, call 631-653-4771. 

Whilst At Quaquanantuck is on hiatus, please continue to check the Events Calendar for updates at www.quoguewildliferefuge.org

To make donations to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. You can also use the QWR “text to donate” app for smart phone users; simply by text QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a simple donation form, right on their cell phones.

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Baby bunny. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

“Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” at Quogue Gallery
On view until September 30, “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings,” featuring 23 new paintings by the artist, is the final show of summer 2020 at the Quogue Gallery. 

“Many of Healy’s paintings are abstractions of shore scenes, being places that have evoked particular moods and feelings in the artist,” notes Peter Hastings Falk, Chief Curator and Editor of Discoveries in American Art. “And it is those feelings that he so effectively materializes with mediums ranging from oil, watercolor, encaustic, oil crayon, lacquers, and colored pencil applied to fragments of canvas, boards, and paper.”

Quogue Gallery is at 44 Quogue Street, Quogue, NY 11959. Quoguegallery.com. For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com.

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Winding Down

The summer that, thanks to Covid-19, never really got to wind up … is now winding down in the last two weeks before Labor Day, just as in years past when there were no coronavirus protocols or social distancing restrictions.

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Glisten. —A. Botsford Photo

And even though it looks like there will be no clear Labor Day line of demarcation in population this year, between “the season” and the “off-season,” even though many people will continue to work remotely from their homes or rentals on the East End, even though some college students will be staying home and taking online classes remotely, still there seem to be fewer cars on the road, fewer people on the beach, more parking places available on village and hamlet main streets. It’s quieter.

And although even now, six months in, no one knows how this thing will shake out, some patterns remain intact. Is there some significance in that? No one knows. We wait. We watch. We try to keep safe. We take it one day at a time. We know that kindness counts. We hope. 

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.

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Right of way. —A. Botsford Photo

Mayor’s Corner: Covering the Bases
In his two most recent email updates for Quogue residents, Mayor Peter Sartorius did his usual fine job of summarizing important information and sharing links for further guidance on a number of pertinent issues. 

To see the complete text of Hizzoner’s “roundup of the usual suspects” (as he quipped in his latest subject line), go to www.villageofquogueny.gov and click on Announcements

Hot topics addressed in last week’s email included: the availability of mail-in voting for the November election (www.elections.ny.gov/VotingAbsentee.html) and the ability of the U.S. Post Office to handle the related mail in a timely way; options for early voting, including at the Stony Brook Southampton campus between October 24 and November 1; registering to vote in Quogue, or changing your voter registration to Quogue, with guidance on deadlines; an update on states on the quarantine list for travelers arriving in New York; and such miscellany as the return of recreational bowling as an option, anecdotal observations on mask wearing (or not) among the younger set, and the (limited) reopening of gyms.

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Study in red. —Ginny Rosenblatt Photo

 This week’s email revisited the ever-changing quarantine list (Delaware is off, again, as of this writing); broached the topic of the need for rental applications for long term rentals, even in the off-season; and disclosed that a committee to carry out the mandates set forth in Governor Cuomo’s Police Reform and Reinvention Collaborative has been formed. The “Police Reform Initiative” can be reviewed at www.villageofquogueny.gov/polAnnouncements.cfm. Comments on the initiative and suggestions for the committee’s consideration can be sent to contact@villageofquogueny.gov.  

The Mayor also addressed in this week’s email an array of guidelines and beginning dates for lower-risk and higher-risk school sponsored sports; attempting to decipher this information gave At Quaquanantuck a brain cramp. Noting the amount of confusion among students, parents, and the general public about how, when, or if schools will be opening this fall, Hizzoner seized the opportunity to salute, and express tremendous gratitude to the “very able and dedicated” Quogue School Superintendent Jeff Ryvicker, whose job it is to sort out all of these issues safely and responsibly. At Quaquanantuck concurs wholeheartedly with the Mayor’s sentiments. 

For those who are not yet on the Village’s email address list, the easiest way  to see the most current, and all the Mayor’s letters, is to go to www.villageofquogueny.gov and click on Announcements. Once again, to receive Hizzoner’s email blasts, send an email to ABuhl@villageofquogueny.gov and ask to be put on the email list.

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Timing is everything. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Postmaster Yaira Rodriguez Moving On after 21 Years of Service
Perhaps the most significant news item in either of the most recent email blasts from the Mayor is the announcement that Postmaster Yaira Rodriguez, who has been in charge of the U.S. Post Office in Quogue for the past 21½ years, will be leaving Quogue to take over the postmaster’s position in Holtsville, significantly closer to her home, likely by next week. 

Ms. Rodriguez’s record of dedicated service during her tenure as postmaster is beyond impressive. Residents who moved to Quogue or purchased homes here in the last 20 years have never seen anyone else in the post. Longtime residents of Quogue who were children when Ms. Rodriguez stepped into the position now have children of their own. 

Bill Clinton was the U.S. President when she started in Quogue and she has served through the two terms of George W. Bush, two terms of Barack Obama, and four years of Donald Trump’s presidency. Twenty-one Christmas seasons and attendant holiday card and parcel panic attacks; 21 IRS income tax deadlines; millions of pieces of mail; mountains and mountains and more mountains of recycling junk mail. Twenty-one years of adapting to the massive, Bay of Fundy ebb and flow of seasonal population. 

Through it all, she has consistently gone above and beyond the requirements of her job description in her efforts to help Quogue residents with any and all issues related to sending and receiving their mail.

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Quogue Postmaster Yaira Rodriguez. —A. Botsford Photo

Then came Covid-19. If there can be said to be degrees of “essential,” the Post Office—the crucial circulatory system of our nation, lately rendered slightly anemic by electronic mail and private shipping services—became even more essential than anyone could have imagined once the word came down to shelter in place and stay at home.

The village population swelled to almost summer levels, with many new renters trying to establish a mailing address in Quogue for the first time. Packages mailed to General Delivery filled the back of the building, while boxholders struggled to adapt to safety protocols by ordering needed supplies online and unavoidably further clogging delivery lines. All too often, Ms. Rodriguez and her staff were on the receiving end of the abrasive release of pent up frustrations on the part of impatient postal patrons. They never buckled, never snapped. 

Instead, following the postmaster’s lead, they stepped up, as they always have, to keep the mail moving. Typically with a smile. 

The timing of Ms. Rodriguez’s job change was propitious. She said in a brief interview this week that she was notified of her assignment to be the Holtsville postmaster on July 31. On August 6, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy instituted a management hiring freeze, which Ms. Rodriguez said means that the postmaster vacancy opening in Quogue with her departure—and any other postmaster vacancies across the country—will not be filled until sometime in the future, presumably after the major reorganization that Mr. DeJoy announced at the same time as the hiring freeze. 

Ms. Rodriguez said that instead of appointing a new postmaster for Quogue, the USPS will assign an “officer in charge” of the village post office to take over when she leaves, which she said “should be next week sometime.”

At Quaquanantuck salutes Ms. Rodriguez, and all the USPS staffers who keep our Post Office running smoothly, no matter what the challenges. It is hoped that all village residents will stop by to thank the departing postmaster for her years of truly dedicated service and wish her well in her new position. There are only a few days left to do so, apparently, so it might mean waiting on line with your mask on. Considering her record, her willingness, and all the help she has given to countless local postal patrons over the years, it doesn’t seem like a lot to ask.

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Moonflower. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

 QWR Full Moon Night Hike September 1; Private Group Paddling September 2
Returning to the realm of the actual for about 90 minutes, the Quogue Wildlife Refuge will host a Full Moon Night Hike social distance program on Tuesday, September 1, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. QWR full moon

During the walk through the forest up to North Pond and back, adults and families with children age 11 and up—wearing the requisite masks/face coverings—will look and listen for nocturnal creatures and undertake some night vision activities under the light of September’s Full Corn Moon. 

This program is $5 for Wildlife Refuge members; $10 for non-members, due at the time of registration. Reservations, by telephone (631-653-4771) or online by clicking here, are required at least 24 hours in advance. 

On Wednesday, September 2, the QWR will offer another social distance program in the realm of the actual with a reprise of this summer’s Private Group Paddle Day. Family-Paddle-Day-400x300

Groups, households and families are invited to register for one of three private time slots (10:30 to noon; 12:30 to 2; or 2:15 to 3:45) to enjoy exploring Old Ice Pond via kayak or canoe. Each group will be partially guided by a naturalist, allowing some time to free paddle. 

Paddlers will have a chance to observe the various species of freshwater fish, turtles, and birds that live in and around this 100+ year old pond originally created for ice harvesting for the Quogue Ice Company. A scavenger hunt/ID chart will be available. This program will be weather dependent.

Families/households/groups must pre-register and pre-pay the $250 fee, which covers up to six people ($50 for each additional person). Single kayaks, double kayaks, and canoes will be determined prior to each group’s arrival based on the individuals in the party. 

For more information about the program and to register, visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org or call 631-653-4771. 

To make donations to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. You can also use the QWR “text to donate” app for smart phone users; simply by text QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a simple donation form, right on their cell phones.


The younger cast of the Quogue Junior Theater Troupe put the finishing touches on their production of “We’re All in This Together” in rehearsals this week. Clockwise from left: the full cast wearing special QJTT t-shirts; the boys perfect their dance routine for a number from “Spamalot”; the girls scrub the floor for “It’s a Hard-Knock Life” from “Annie.” —Sue Prior Photos


Quogue Library Wraps Virtual Program on Classical Music
This summer’s newly retitled “Intro to Classical Music” series continues with the third and final  installment on Saturday, August 29, at 4 p.m.: “Can You Keep a Secret?: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6.”

Tchaikovsky
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

The three lectures of the virtual series were designed for those who might be less familiar with opera and classical music but would like to know more. Everyone logging in for the virtual program will get an inside look from the maestro’s perspective, while conducting along with an animated orchestra.

To register for this program, email info@quoguelibrary.org and request the Zoom login information. 

The next Zoom discussions of the newly formed Anti-Racism Book Club will be held on Tuesday, September 8, and Tuesday, September 22, at 7:30 p.m. The discussions will focus on the book “How to Be an Anti-Racist” by Ibram X. Kendi.

To register for Quogue Library virtual programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration. Clicking on the “I Hate Classical Music” flier will direct you to email info@quoguelibrary.org.   

“Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” at Quogue Gallery
On view until September 30, “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings,” featuring 23 new paintings by the artist, is the final show of summer 2020 at the Quogue Gallery. 

“Many of Healy’s paintings are abstractions of shore scenes, being places that have evoked particular moods and feelings in the artist,” notes Peter Hastings Falk, Chief Curator and Editor of Discoveries in American Art. “And it is those feelings that he so effectively materializes with mediums ranging from oil, watercolor, encaustic, oil crayon, lacquers, and colored pencil applied to fragments of canvas, boards, and paper.”

Quogue Gallery is at 44 Quogue Street, Quogue, NY 11959. Quoguegallery.com. For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com.

Reverend Canon Michael Ambler Leads Atonement Virtual Service 
The Reverend Canon Michael Ambler will officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, August 30, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com.

Rev Michael Ambler lg
The Reverend Canon Michael Ambler

Reverend Ambler, who often visits with family in Quogue, is Canon to the Ordinary Diocese of Maine in Portland and is the former Rector of Grace Church in Bath, Maine. 

A member of the choir and an acolyte at the Church of the Atonement as a child, he earned his Master of Divinity degree from Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, MA. He and his wife, Darreby, have three children: one son, Michael III, is a political campaign consultant; their son John works for TIST, an international development and conservation company; and their daughter Elizabeth (Elle is a recent graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to go to www.quoguechurch.org for the Zoom link or send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Moving On from Machu Picchu, Moley Envisions New Water Feature
Longtime readers of this column may remember a few years back when Quogue Quips film auteur and local visionary Roger Moley decided to remake his yard in the image of the 15th century Inca citadel Machu Picchu. 

Inspired by a visit to the site in southern Peru with his family, and weary of the flatness of eastern Long Island, he prepared to undertake one of the largest earth moving and giant stone masonry projects in history in order to achieve on only a slightly smaller scale an approximation of the 7,970 foot mountain ridge and the mysterious ancient structures positioned near the summit. When he realized how long the work would take, however, and how much it would disrupt the tranquility of his neighborhood, he willingly abandoned his dream for the sake of the community.

Moley rainbow RM
Rainbow over Quogue. —Roger Moley Photo

 Readers will no doubt be happy to learn that Roger’s visionary spirit is still alive and well, though, thanks to the inspiration he received from the photo above he took recently of a rainbow near his home. Since he has always considered a residence in Quogue to be the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, he began investigating the physics of maintaining a rainbow over his house full time. 

His research indicated that full-time rainbows are typically only seen in the vicinity of large scale waterfalls, and that gave him the idea for creating a substantial water feature in his backyard. Roger is currently looking into ways to reroute and recirculate millions of gallons of fresh water daily from the Pine Barrens aquifer into his planned waterfall.

Moley Falls
Artist’s rendering of Roger Moley’s planned water feature for his backyard in the village.

 Once he works out the details of the design—and the engineering of significantly varying the elevation of his property—he expects that round-the-clock work on the new project should be completed by sometime in 2023. And while he has conceded that, like the Machu Picchu project, building the new water feature will require clearing some hurdles with the Zoning Board of Appeals, and will inevitably disturb some of his neighbors, he believes any unhappiness will evaporate when the community gasps with wonder at the majesty of Moley Falls, and the perpetual rainbow and beacon of hope glowing in the sky above it. 

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

Contributions Welcome
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Acts of Faith

It was a simple act of faith. It was one of the most inspiring things I have seen in Quogue in quite awhile. 

Anyone parsing the panoply of blessings that define life in our village would have to pay heed to the abundant evidence of simple acts of faith—and simple acts of soldiering on and restoring faith—that knit together the fabric of this remarkable community.

Sea Flat AB
Sea flat. —A. Botsford Photo

 Thanks to the coronavirus, much of this evidence has moved into the virtual realm. For just one example, where once one could see cars lining Quogue Street on Sunday mornings in front of the Church of the Atonement, now visiting preachers lead prayers for the faithful in Zoom meetings replete with traditional music  courtesy of undaunted organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler and the church’s Zoom coordinator, Schuyler Rowe. 

Physical evidence abounds up and down Jessup Avenue, where the Quogue Historical Society soldiers on by providing paper maps for self-guided walking tours of the diminutive but buzzing business district. The complete makeover of the Quogue Market into a more welcoming space represents a major commitment to the community that is unquestionably an act of faith. 

From Beth’s Cafe and the Quogue Gallery on Quogue Street to Flowers by Rori, the temporary headquarters of the Quogue Library and the Post Office on Midland—and all the shops and businesses in between: Double Rainbow, Quogue Liquors, Homespun, the Quogue Shops, Jen Going Interiors, Big Buddha Yoga and Barre, and Blown Away Hair Salon—just opening their doors for business can be seen as a simple act of faith during this pandemic. But beyond that, the level of customer service they offer goes beyond gratitude to their clientele; it speaks to their faith in the healing and connecting power of kindness, staying positive and doing the right thing. 

All the people who continue to support the groups and organizations that are now restricted by pandemic protocols from safely fulfilling their missions or even undertaking their traditional fundraising events are making their own acts of faith. With donations large and small—to the Quogue Volunteer Fire Department, Quogue Wildlife Refuge, the Police Benevolent Association, Quogue Historical Society, Hampton Theatre Company, Quogue Library, Quogue Junior Theater Troupe, Quogue Chamber Music, the Quogue Association and others—they are taking personal responsibility for doing their part to nurture and protect the soul of our community.

tranquility bay EC
Tranquility bay. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

What I witnessed, though, was a personal act of faith. Driving down Ocean Avenue, I saw a car pulled over with flashers blinking and a man on his knees beside it. I slowed down as I approached, thinking I would stop to see if he was alright or needed help. But as I passed, he stood up and I could see he had laid a prayer rug on the grass, with his smart phone in the middle of it. 

Perhaps he used the compass on his phone to orient the rug toward the east and Mecca. Driving down the road, I glanced in the rear view and saw him kneeling and touching his forehead to the ground. I’m not sure of all the reasons why, but seeing that man in the afternoon light stopped on the side of the road to pray made me feel better somehow, more hopeful. 

I know he wasn’t doing anything for my benefit, but I was grateful that I was able to witness a man, just one man I didn’t know, whose faith dictated that he stop whatever he was doing and take the time to pray. On Ocean Avenue. In Quogue. It opened up our community. I hope he felt safe. 

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.   

Open House Art Show Saturday Benefits Wildlife Refuge
Artist Steve Alpert and his wife Dorothy are hosting an open house art exhibition titled “Desire” on Saturday, August 22, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., with 20 percent of proceeds from any sales going to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. Rain date for the outdoor exhibition at 29 Old Main Road in Quogue, at which all coronavirus protocols will be observed, is Sunday, August 23, also from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

SA Between Us 30x40
Steve Alpert, “Between Us,” Oil on canvas, 30 by 40 inches. —Image courtesy of the artist

According to a release, the outdoor exhibition will feature “oil paintings such as ‘Desire,’ which was inspired by a trip to the Amazon region in Peru, and recalls Claude Monet’s Water Lilies cycle.” Also on display will be more recent works, such as “Duck,” “Summer Sun,” and “At Rest,” paintings  that “capture the magnificence and uniqueness of the East End’s landscapes.” 

Mr. Alpert continues to pay tribute to the men and women who serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. His latest initiative is “Proudly She Served,” a series of large portraits honoring “active duty military and veteran women who exemplify courage, strength, and selfless service, and who inspire the generations of young women following them,” according to the artist’s dedicated website for the project. (www.proudlysheserved.com

Meanwhile, partly in response to the global disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the artist  has “turned his attention to where he began: nature,” according to the release. 

The artist explained his idea of dedicating funds to the Wildlife Refuge this way: “We are a short walk to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge and have enjoyed its unique year-round splendor” ever since he and his wife moved here some 20 years ago, the artist said. He noted that during these days of stay at home orders and quarantine, the Refuge has been “as much a sanctuary for people as the animals it protects.”

“Recognizing that this summer season is going to be difficult for many non-profit organizations that depend on special fundraising events to help meet their operating costs, and that a number of local art shows have been cancelled,” Mr. Alpert said, “it seemed a perfect fit to have an open house art exhibition at our home and commit to 20 percent of all sales to go to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge.”

SA Duck 12 x 36
Steve Alpert, “Duck,” Oil on canvas, 12 by 36 inches. —Image courtesy of the artist

To make donations directly to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. You can also use the QWR “text to donate” app for smart phone users. Donations can now be made from anywhere simply by texting QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a very simple donation form, right on their cell phones. 

Quogue Library Virtual Programs for Every Age and Interest
This summer’s newly retitled “Intro to Classical Music” series continues with a second installment on Saturday, August 22, at 4 p.m.: “It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s Mozart’s Symphony 40.”Mozart

The three installments of the series, offered on successive Saturdays in August at 4 p.m., offer lectures for those less familiar with opera and classical music. Everyone logging in for the virtual program will get an inside look from the maestro’s perspective, while conducting along with an animated orchestra.

The Saturday, August 29 installment at 4 p.m. will be “Can You Keep a Secret: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6.” To register for this program, email info@quoguelibrary.org and request the Zoom login information. 

The newly formed Anti-Racism Book Club will launch a Zoom discussion of a second book, “How to Be an Anti-Racist” in meetings scheduled at 7:30 p.m. on three Tuesdays: August 25, and September 8 and 22. 

Teens and Adults are invited to “Express Yourself!” on a live Zoom tour of Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center with educator Joyce Raimondo on Wednesday, August 26, at 4 p.m.  

To register for Quogue Library virtual programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration. Clicking on the “I Hate Classical Music” flier will direct you to email info@quoguelibrary.org.   

“Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” Opening at Quogue Gallery
On view until September 30, “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings,” featuring 23 new paintings by the artist, is the final show of summer 2020 at the Quogue Gallery.

QG Healey Watch Hill
Eugene Healy, “Watch Hill,” 2020, Mixed media on canvas, 25.75 x 38.75 in. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

 “Many of Healy’s paintings are abstractions of shore scenes, being places that have evoked particular moods and feelings in the artist,” notes Peter Hastings Falk, Chief Curator and Editor of Discoveries in American Art. “And it is those feelings that he so effectively materializes with mediums ranging from oil, watercolor, encaustic, oil crayon, lacquers, and colored pencil applied to fragments of canvas, boards, and paper. Often, one delights in the subtle addition of beach sand, fragments of printed fabrics, and even pieces of window screens.” 

Starting in 1967, the artist began a long exhibition record with art museums and galleries throughout the country. He has also served as a curator, beginning in the late 1970s when he conceived and organized the popular traveling exhibition, “American Vision,” which was launched at New York University. Later, he served as Director of the National Artists’Alliance, and as exhibition designer for the Yale Center for British Art. Healy earned a BFA from New York Institute of Technology in 1972. 

Quogue Gallery is at 44 Quogue Street, Quogue, NY 11959. Quoguegallery.com. For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com.

QA Marcia Chester LM
Marcia Bradley consults with the Quogue Gallery’s Chester Murray at the opening reception for “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings.” —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Spirited Competition for Golf Titles in All Brackets
PGA Golf Professional Richard Stucklen organized an array of tourneys for young and old to establish the club champions for this summer at the Quogue Field Club. 

Starting with the juniors, in the 7 to 8 age bracket, Lach McAuliffe was the winner and Hugh McAuliffe the runner up. Cole Durham was the winner and Nathan Koehler the runner up in the 9 to 10 bracket; Lach McCaghren was the winner and Miles Tamis the runner up in the 11 to 12. In the 13 to 16 division, Will McCarthy was the winner and Robert Moran the runner up.  

Next up was the Pinehurst tournament for Adults and Juniors, with a three-way tie for first in the 10 and under division: Cole Durham and Sean Barrett, Hugh and Jack Wylie, and Nathan and Jay Koehler. Chase and Keith Carter were the winners and Silas and Chris Warren the runners up in the 11 to 12 bracket. And Robert and Tom Moran bested runners up Jack and Eric Sartorius in a playoff in the 13 to 16 division. 

In the Ladies Club Championship, Caroline Harris Bond was the winner of the 9-Holers Flight and Anne Anthony was the runner up. This year’s Ladies Club Champion is Wendy McCarthy, and the runner up, established by a playoff against Frances Beatty Adler and Stefanie Beck, is Katy Barbatsuly.  

Men’s Club Championship finalists this year were Peter Prentis vs. Kip Allardt in the second flight; Gerry Keefe vs. Peter Schellbach in the first flight; and Dana Robinson vs. Jed McCarthy in the Senior Flight. This year’s Men’s Club Champion is Sean Barrett, who defeated runner up Clint Dewey in the finals.

QFC Golf Champs (2)
Men’s Club Champion golfer Sean Barrett and runner up Clint Dewey doffed their masks and faced the camera following the championship match at the Quogue Field Club. —Claudia Stucklen Photo

 In the recent Stableford tournament, meanwhile, Tom Moran and Peter Prentis tied for fourth; Evan Clark was third; Phoebe Erdman was the runner up; and the winner was Brady Tolan. 

Congratulations to all the champions and all the competitors!

The Reverend Zachary Thompson Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Church of the Atonement on Quogue Street is welcoming the Reverend Zachary Thompson to officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, August 23, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com.

Rev Zachary Thompson
Reverend Zachary Thompson

Reverend Thompson has been an Associate Rector at St. James’ Church in Manhattan since 2017 and is primarily responsible there for parish life, new member incorporation, and pastoral care. Prior to joining the St. James’staff, he served as an Associate Priest and as a Rector in Atlanta, GA, as well as Chaplain at Emory University. 

Originally from Princeton, NJ, he earned his Master of Divinity at Emory University and a Master of Sacred Theology at Sewanee: The University of the South. The Rev. Thompson’s wife, Amy, served as an elementary school educator for a decade in Atlanta, and is now the Director of Admissions at the Church of the Epiphany Day School on the Upper East Side. They have two young sons, Rowan and Ezra. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to go to www.quoguechurch.org for the Zoom link or send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

Contributions Welcome
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Debt of Gratitude

The Memorial Day observance honoring the men and women who gave up their lives in the service of our nation. The final production of the Hampton Theatre Company’s 2019-2020 season. Blockbuster professional fireworks extravaganzas to mark the Fourth of July.

The Wild Night for Wildlife fundraiser for the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. Gala benefit evenings for Stony Brook Southampton Hospital and East End Hospice, among other worthy causes. The Quogue Association Beach Party.

The Quogue Historical Society’s “Celebrate Art” party and Village Green art show. Live Quogue Junior Theater Troupe musicals at the Community Hall. The QA Duck Race. The season capping September concert presented by Quogue Chamber Music. The list goes on and on.

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Hot Dog morning. —A. Botsford Photo

It has been a summer of missing things, gatherings of every description that in the end all boil down to celebrations of community. Among those events most sorely missed is perhaps the most open-hearted celebration of community that we have: the annual Open House hosted by the volunteers of the Quogue Fire Department. 

As a mailer for the QFD pointed out, since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, department volunteers have been responding to twice the usual number of alarms, carefully adhering to safety protocols while doing their utmost, as ever, to protect our community. Required to complete more than 100 hours of training annually, the members of the department are residents volunteering to be on the front lines to respond to more than 200 types of calls 24 hours a day, seven days a week, all year long. 

Like other nonprofits, the QFD has launched its 2020 fund drive without the anchoring event of the early August Open House, which traditionally has primed the pump to start donations flowing. While firefighting expenses such as new tools, gear (PPE) and apparatus maintenance are covered by village taxes, money raised in the annual fund drive enable the QFD Fraternal Association to underwrite such community activities as the Halloween Ghost Parade, a visit from Santa Claus, the Easter Egg sweep, Memorial Day ceremonies, fire safety education programs, and the annual Open House. 

Some of the funds raised also go to support a modest life insurance policy and family scholarships for QFD volunteers, both of which represent added incentives in new member recruitment and volunteer retention. 

The final paragraph of the department’s mission statement says it all: “To inspire love of country, good citizenship, civic virtue and self-sacrifice, and to perpetuate the spirit which from the earliest days has stimulated volunteer firefighters in the rendering of service of the highest type in the protection of life and property from fire or other life threatening emergency, without the motivation of fee or reward.”

QFD c 1922 QHS
Volunteers of the Quogue and Westhampton Beach Fire Department circa 1922. —Image courtesy of the Quogue Historical Society

In the end, we owe the volunteers of the Quogue Fire Department a tremendous debt of gratitude, not only for their service in protecting our lives and our property but also for their example of civic responsibility and showing us the true meaning of community spirit. 

If you received the department mailer, please consider enclosing a generous donation in the return envelope provided. Didn’t get or can’t find the QFD mailer? Make out a check and send it to Quogue Fire Department, PO Box 792, Quogue, NY 11959.

The department, which has an active Explorer Program for community teenagers 15 and up “to prepare the next generation of firefighters,” is always looking for new volunteers. To find out more or to sign up, write to the QFD at PO Box 792, call 631-653-4620, or go to www.quoguefiredepartment.org and click on Contact Us. 

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Rainbow over Quaquanantuck; August 12, 7:10 a.m. —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Cara Wall Is Final Guest in Library’s Author Series
Writer Cara Wall will be the fourth and final guest in the Quogue Library’s 2020 Conversations with the Author series on Sunday, August 16, at 5 p.m. 

Ms. Wall will read from her debut novel, “The Dearly Beloved,” before engaging in a conversation with At Quaquanantuck columnist Andrew Botsford. Following the discussion, there will be an opportunity for members of the Zoom audience to ask questions, relayed to the author by Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom. 

“The Dearly Beloved” has been characterized as a poignant meditation on faith and reason, marriage and children, and the ways we find meaning in our lives. The novel follows two couples through decades of love and friendship, jealousy and understanding, forgiveness and commitment. Against the backdrop of turbulent changes facing  New York city and their church’s congregation, the four protagonists forge improbable paths through their evolving relationships, each struggling with uncertainty, heartbreak, and joy.

Cara Wall
Cara Wall

Fifteen years in the making, “The Dearly Beloved” has been called “a gorgeous, wise, and provocative novel that is destined to become a classic.”

Cara Wall is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and Stanford University. While at Iowa, she taught fiction writing in the undergraduate creative writing department and as the founder and inaugural director of the Iowa Young Writers’ Studio; she has also taught middle school English and history. Her writing has been published by Glamour, Salon, and The San Francisco Chronicle. She lives in New York City with her family. 

Writing for Entertainment Weekly magazine, David Canfield wrote:“‘The Dearly Beloved’ is the best book about faith in recent memory.” 

The Kirkus starred review includes this assessment: “Writing with restrained lyricism, Wall’s debut … offers a kind of literary chamber music, combining the viewpoints of a quartet of characters across multiple decades and events. ”

And Mary Beth Keane, author of “Ask Again, Yes,” wrote: “When I began reading ‘The Dearly Beloved’ I braced for piety, worried it might be a book only a believer could appreciate. Instead, I found myself carried along by Cara Wall’s luminous prose, and then by these characters and their stories. I saw myself in their doubts, in their hopes. An expansive narrative that draws in fifty years and two marriages, this is a novel to settle in with, to read slowly. 

“It asks the biggest question: where can each of us find meaning in this life? There is no moralizing here, only empathy. When I arrived at the end I felt absolutely lifted by the spirit of the story.” Dearly Beloved

This year’s series has been organized by Quogue Library volunteer Ellen de Saint Phalle. Thanks to the generosity of this summer’s guest authors, participation in the 2020 Author Series programs is free; register at QuogueLibrary.org

All the authors’ books are available for sale at QuogueLibrary.org and at the library’s temporary location at 4 Midland Street during curbside service hours. A portion of the proceeds will support the library through the generosity of Bookhampton Bookstore. “The Dearly Beloved” can also be purchased by clicking here

Sunday’s Conversations with the Author program begins at 5 p.m. For more information, email Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom at jbloom@quoguelibrary.org.

Junior Theater Troupe Gets Creative for Covid Summer
The young musical theatre actors, singers, dancers and tech crew of the Quogue Junior Theater Troupe—along with the directors, designers, tech specialists, and producer and founder Sue Prior—got a lot of firsthand experience in the-show-must-go-on-no-matter-what tactical innovation this summer.

QJTT poodles SRP
Olivia Robins, Grace Gramins, Anne Huffines, and Mary Kate Logler in a number from “We’re All in This Together.”

Given the restrictions on large groups gathering indoors and social distancing requirements, the QJTT team first transformed the interior of the theater at the Quogue Community Hall into a studio space set up for filming culminating performances. 

The older cast rehearsed seven nights a week for five weeks, working with an original script created specifically for this summer by the two directors, Mickey Nugent and Chris McKee. Titled “We’re All in This Together,” the show features classic and new Broadway show tunes, with performance rights purchased by QJTT.

From left: Grace Gramins at the keyboard; the tech crew for “We’re All in This Together”; an energetic masked dance number.


Last week, the final performance was filmed over the course of one afternoon and evening. The footage is currently being edited and will be available this weekend for online viewing (with a code) by cast families and donors. After the season ends, DVDs will be available for cast families. 

QJTT founder Sue Prior was beyond gratified by the way everyone pulled together to make the show both safe and a success. “With a great deal of effort and prayers, we managed to pull it off,” she wrote in an email this week. “The cast and staff had a blast and everyone stayed safe and well. We want to extend special thanks to our Mayor and Trustees for allowing us to use the theater space wisely.”

QJTT all cast crew SRP
Cast and crew for QJTT’s “We’re All in This Together.” —All photos courtesy of Richard and Sue Prior

The younger cast, rehearsing over a seven week period, will be following in the older cast’s footsteps in a few weeks, presenting for filming a different show with the same title, “We’re All in This Together,” with script created by directors Chris Kelly and Chris McKee and Broadway music purchased in the same manner.

BC night heron 2 RC
Black-crowned night-heron stands a watch. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Quogue Library Virtual Programs for Every Age and Interest
On Friday, August 14, at 3 p.m. the Quogue Library, in association with the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, will host “Let’s Talk Hummingbirds.”ruby t hummingbird The family program will offer information about eastern Long Island’s local hummingbird species, the ruby-throated hummingbird, and offer tips on how to attract them to the backyard. Appropriate for children 8 and up, teens and adults, the program will include a PowerPoint presentation covering a variety of topics about these wondrous birds. 

A pair of Quogue co-authors, Liz Gold Somekh and Stacey Maslin, will read their new book, “Dachshund Days: Meet the Gang,” in a virtual presentation sponsored by the library on Wednesday, August 19, at 10 a.m.
Characterized by the library as “perfect for children and dog lovers,” the book recounts an adventure featuring four next door neighbor pups who won’t let a fence stop them from building a lasting friendship. 

This summer’s “I Hate Classical Music” series gets off to a strong start on Saturday, August 15, at 4 p.m. with “Fate Knocking: Exploring Beethoven’s 5th Symphony.”
The three installments of the “I Hate Classical Music” series, offered on successive Saturdays in August at 4 p.m., offer lectures for those less familiar with opera and classical music.

Ludwig van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven

Everyone logging in for the virtual program will get an inside look from the maestro’s perspective, while conducting along with an animated orchestra.
On August 22 at 4 p.m. the series will present “It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s Mozart’s Symphony 40.” To register, email info@quoguelibrary.org and request the Zoom login information. 

To register for Quogue Library virtual programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration. Clicking on the “I Hate Classical Music” flier will direct you to email info@quoguelibrary.org.  

“Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” Opening at Quogue Gallery
On view from August 14 to September 30, “Eugene Healy: Recent Paintings” will be the final show of summer 2020 at the Quogue Gallery. An opening reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday, August 15, for the exhibition, which features 23 new paintings by the artist. 

Peter Hastings Falk, Chief Curator and Editor of Discoveries in American Art, has this to say about Eugene Healy’s work: “Many of Healy’s paintings are abstractions of shore scenes, being places that have evoked particular moods and feelings in the artist. And it is those feelings that he so effectively materializes with mediums ranging from oil, watercolor, encaustic, oil crayon, lacquers, and colored pencil applied to fragments of canvas, boards, and paper. Often, one delights in the subtle addition of beach sand, fragments of printed fabrics, and even pieces of window screens. 

“These are musical arrangements. Yet what is generally not known about the artist is that in the process of capturing those feelings just right, he returns to each work, over and over, almost obsessively making changes until he is certain his expressions sing … Collage is a melody he first heard as a 13-year-old growing up in Brooklyn, where he was born in 1948. Among his early primary influences, he cites Matisse, Vermeer, Diebenkorn, Rauschenberg, Hoffman, and the Fauve painters.”

Middle Beach Road, 2020, Mixed media on canvas, 40_ x 32_
Eugene Healy, “Middle Beach Road,” 2020, Mixed media on canvas, 40 x 32 in. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

Starting in 1967, the artist began a long exhibition record with art museums and galleries throughout the country. He has also served as a curator, beginning in the late 1970s when he conceived and organized the popular traveling exhibition, “American Vision,” which was launched at New York University. Later, he served as Director of the National Artists’Alliance, and as exhibition designer for the Yale Center for British Art. Healy earned a BFA from New York Institute of Technology in 1972. 

As regular readers of this column know, the mission of the Quogue Gallery is to present a program of artistic excellence by showcasing the work of prominent, mid-career and emerging artists in the modernist tradition. Its core focus is on discovering and exhibiting figurative and abstract expressionist painters who are recognized historically as well as those of great promise whose work has not received the attention and critical response it so richly deserves. 

Since its founding in 2014, the Quogue Gallery’s place in the modern and contemporary art world has been widely acknowledged by the press. The gallery has been featured in many publications, including the New York Times, Dan’s Paper, Beach Magazine, Hamptons Art Hub, Artnet News, Southampton Press, and others. The gallery has also received critical recognition in reviews published by Hamptons Art Hub, Artnet News and other outlets. 

Quogue Gallery is at 44 Quogue Street, Quogue, NY 11959. Quoguegallery.com. For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com.

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Midsummer magnolia. —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Tracking the White Horse

From time to time, At Quaquanantuck receives requests for more information about specific aspects of Quogue history or the historical narratives related to different local landmarks. On more than one occasion, for example, readers have asked about the white horse standing sentinel at the corner of Montauk Highway and Route 104, also known as Quogue Riverhead Road. 

How lucky are village residents that we have the exceptional resource of the Quogue Historical Society and its dedicated curator Julie Greene to turn to for the answers to questions like these?

For most area residents—even those who have reached what is euphemistically referred to as “a certain age”—it seems there has always been a white horse on that corner. Thus far in her research, Ms. Greene has not been able to determine exactly when the original horse was installed. But what she has learned about the history of the property where it holds court offers some clues. 

The house behind the horse on the corner property was built by the Griffin family circa 1800. In 1923, Marcus Griffin sold the house to the Fitch family. According to Ms. Greene, it’s not clear whether it was the Griffin family or the Fitch family that gave the house the name Illahee, which the namers took to mean “the Homestead.”

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The latest iteration of the white horse that has long been a landmark at the corner of Route 104 and Montauk Highway. —A. Botsford Photo

 Side note: Cursory research by At Quaquanantuck indicates that “illahee” does not appear to be a Shinnecock word, as one might imagine. According to Wikipedia, it “means earth or country in the Native language Chinuk Wawa” spoken by indigenous people in the Pacific Northwest. Today, Illahee is the name of an unincorporated community in Kitsap County in the state of Washington. 

In 1924, the Fitch family opened the house as an antique, gift, and tea shop. The tea room was discontinued but the antique show continued until 1953, when the Fitch family sold the house to John Nilsson. 

Based on her research so far, Ms. Greene believes the house continued as an antique shop under the name White Horse Antiques until 1986, when South Bay Auctions held an auction there prior to the next sale of the property. While the white horse that gave the business its name was on the corner at the time of the auction, it is not clear, as noted above, when it was first installed. 

Over the years, the white horse has been through a number of changes. At Quaquanantuck recalls that there was once a tradition of seniors graduating from Westhampton Beach High School “riding” the steed prior to commencement. Damage from the riders and the vagaries of seasonal weather over the years necessitated at least one substantial overhaul. The horse that stands on the corner today is a replacement for a previous iteration, which was apparently stolen, according to what Ms. Greene has been able to learn. 

Quogue Historical Society at Home
A reminder that the QHS has put up an online exhibition, “Through the Lens of George Bradford Brainerd: Quogue, ca. 1875,” consisting of images that Mr. Brainerd captured of Quogue in the mid-1870s. Taken together, the images document a portrait of the village’s early days, barely recognizable from the vantage point of today. quoguehistory.org/qhs-home-exhibitions-online.

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Circa 1875 view of Quogue Street (looking west) from Old Depot Road. —George Bradford Brainerd Photo courtesy of Quogue Historical Society

Enjoy walking? Interested in history? Download a Walking Tour Map of Historic Jessup Avenue from the quoguehistory.org website, or pick up a map outside the QHS Pond House. The map provides an authoritative guide for a socially distanced walk around what the QHS is calling “Quogue’s bustling commercial, cultural, and civic center.”

And remember, now is the time to create or renew your membership and increase your donation to the Quogue Historical Society. Click here or visit quoguehistory.org/support/financial-contributions/

After Isaias blew through the village last week, the QHS thoughtfully shared stories and details of the Great Hurricane of 1938. With fingers crossed, At Quaquanantuck is planning to publish the QHS account closer to the 82 anniversary of the storm known as the Long Island Express on September 21.

Steve Alpert Open House Art Show Benefits Wildlife Refuge
Artist Steve Alpert and his wife Dorothy are hosting an open house art exhibition titled “Desire” on Saturday, August 22, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., with 20 percent of proceeds from sales going to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. Rain date for the outdoor exhibition at 29 Old Main Road in Quogue, at which all coronavirus protocols will be observed, is Sunday, August 23, also from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Steve Alpert, “Silver Linings,” Oil on canvas, 40 x 78 in. —Image courtesy of the artist.

A press release on the “Desire” exhibition explained the show’s title this way: “Desire for the beauty of nature. Desire for a better world through philanthropy. These tenets are the foundation of all the work of nationally renowned painter Steve Alpert, from his contemporary military paintings to his abstract landscapes that rejoice in the wonder of nature.” 

According to the release, the outdoor exhibition will feature “oil paintings such as ‘Desire,’ which was inspired by a trip to the Amazon region in Peru, and recalls Claude Monet’s Water Lilies cycle.” Also on display will be more recent works, such as “Duck,” “Summer Sun,” and “At Rest,” paintings  that “capture the magnificence and uniqueness of the East End’s landscapes.” 

Just prior to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Mr. Alpert closed out his 30-year career as a TV producer/director in New York in order to turn his attention to his lifelong passion for painting. His particular focus in the beginning was on extolling the virtues of those who serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. Seven large paintings in the artist’s“Full Honors” series—based on his photographs of a full honors funeral ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery—have been on exhibition at the Pentagon for the last two years and are slated to hang there indefinitely.

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Artist Steve Alpert, his wife Dorothy, and the late Ray. —Linda Phillips Photo

In November 2003, following the crash of two Black Hawk helicopters over Northern Iraq, the artist initiated a series of paintings to honor the 17 soldiers lost in the crash. Proceeds from these works and others in his contemporary military oeuvre have gone to support veterans and their families. As an adjunct professor at Fordham University, Mr. Alpert teaches an art workshop for veterans as part of the Fordham Veteran’s Initiative.

Today, the artist is continuing to pay tribute to the men and women who serve in the U.S. Armed Forces. His latest initiative is “Proudly She Served,” a series of large portraits honoring “active duty military and veteran women who exemplify courage, strength, and selfless service, and who inspire the generations of young women following them,” according to the artist’s dedicated website for the project. (www.proudlysheserved.com

Meanwhile, partly in response to the global disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the artist  has “turned his attention to where he began: nature,” according to the release. 

Some 21 years ago, Mr. Alpert and his wife Dorothy came to Quogue, where they live on the east shore of Quantuck Creek. “We are a short walk to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge and have enjoyed its unique year-round splendor ever since,”the artist said, noting that during these days of stay at home orders and quarantine, the Refuge has been “as much a sanctuary for people as the animals it protects.”

“Recognizing that this summer season is going to be difficult for many non-profit organizations that depend on special fundraising events to help meet their operating costs, and that a number of local art shows have been cancelled,” Mr. Alpert said, “it seemed a perfect fit to have an open house art exhibition at our home and commit to 20 percent of all sales to go to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge.”

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Steve Alpert, “Desire,” Oil on canvas, 40 x 68 in. —Image courtesy of the artist

Rev. Robert Dannals Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Dr. Robert S. Dannals will officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, August 16, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Now in his 18th season at the Church of the Atonement, Rev. Dannals is Senior Associate Rector at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

Share Your News and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Final Warning

Too late for publication this week, At Quaquanantuck received the press release below from Lieutenant Daniel Hartman of the Quogue Village Police Department. The timeliness of the message and the warning embedded in it begged for immediate publication. 

The release, reprinted here in its entirety, is filled with sobering statistics. But perhaps the most important message for area residents—and especially younger drivers—can be found in Chief Christopher Isola’s conclusion: 

“‘During this enforcement blitz, officers will be out targeting and ticketing speeding drivers,’ said Chief Isola. ‘Our goal is to save lives, and we’re putting all drivers on alert: the posted speed limit IS THE LAW. No more warnings and no more excuses. When it comes to speeding: Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine.’”

Quogue Village Police Department
Launches Enforcement Blitz
During Statewide Speed Awareness Week Campaign
August 6-12, 2020

Christopher Isola, Chief of Police, today launched a speed enforcement blitz for the Village of Quogue as part of Speed Awareness Week, a statewide enforcement campaign organized by the NYS Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee. The intensified enforcement effort against speeding drivers underscores the severity of the problem, both locally and across the nation.

“Speeding translates to death on our roadways. It greatly reduces a driver’s ability to steer safely around another vehicle, a hazardous object, or an unexpected curve. Speeding drivers put themselves, their passengers and other drivers at tremendous risk,” said Chief Christopher Isola.

In 2018, the most recent year for which final data is available, speeding was a contributing factor in 26 percent of all traffic fatalities in the U.S. More than 9,300 people were killed in such crashes, according to figures from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).QVPD

In New York, NHTSA data shows that nearly one-third (29%) of the state’s 943 traffic fatalities in 2018 were caused by speeding. 274 people lost their lives and 1,984 were seriously injured in these preventable collisions. The number of fatal crashes caused by unsafe speed increases in New York during the summer months with the highest totals in June, July, August and September.

NHTSA says 3 in 10 Americans speed. These drivers are also more likely to engage in other risky behaviors, such as not wearing a seat belt, drinking and driving, or using a cell phone while driving. In New York in 2018: 40 percent of speeding drivers involved in fatal crashes were unbelted at the time of the collision, compared to 11 percent of non-speeding drivers; speeding drivers were also more likely to have been drinking (38% versus 21%) than those drivers who were not speeding.

“During the Speed Awareness Week blitz, from August 6-12, officers will intensify enforcement of posted speed limits in the Village of Quogue. We’ll stop and ticket anyone caught speeding—especially on Montauk Highway, Quogue Street, Dune Road, and Old County Road, where most of our speed-related crashes occur,” said Chief Isola.

Forty-two percent (116) of all speed-related traffic fatalities in New York in 2018 occurred on local roads—where the posted speed limits were 55 miles per hour or under. According to NHTSA, a crash on a road with a speed limit of 65 mph or greater is more than twice as likely to result in a fatality than a crash on a road with a speed limit of 45 or 50 mph and nearly five times as likely as a crash on a road with a speed limit of 40 mph or below. About 15 percent of the nation’s speeding-related fatalities occur on interstate highways each year.

A NHTSA research report, “Analysis of Speeding-Related Fatal Motor Vehicle Traffic Crashes,” shows that a major proportion of fatal, speeding-related single-vehicle crashes occur on rural roadways. NHTSA considers a crash speeding-related if the driver was charged with exceeding the posted speed limit or if the driver was driving too fast for conditions at the time.

According to NHTSA, the economic cost to society from speed-related crashes is $52 billion annually.

“During this enforcement blitz, officers will be out targeting and ticketing speeding drivers,” said Chief Isola. “Our goal is to save lives, and we’re putting all drivers on alert – the posted speed limit IS THE LAW. No more warnings and no more excuses. When it comes to speeding: Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine.”traffic stop

Culture vs. Covid-19

Once again the East End was spared the kind of catastrophic damage that hurricane force winds can inflict, receiving instead no more than a hard slap from Tropical Storm Isaias as it blew through on Tuesday of this week.

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Awaiting Isaias; Tuesday, August 4, 11:20 a.m. —A. Botsford Photo

And yet, if the sustained 40 mph winds and gusts to 60 mph that came and went in a matter of a few hours can yield as many power outages, downed trees, sundered arcing electric lines, and scattered heavy branches as were left behind in the wake of Isaias, it is yet another reminder of the vital importance of paying attention and staying on top of preparedness. 

Isaias was a warning shot across the bow, a glancing blow that punched above its weight. Consider that Hurricane Dorian last fall had three times its strength and lingered over the northern Bahamas for almost 24 hours, and take it seriously. This year’s tropical storm season has almost four months to go.

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Storm surf; Tuesday, August 4, 5:10 p.m. —A. Botsford Photo

Another Cultural Highlight Falls to the Coronavirus 
Historically at this time of year, patrons and music loving residents of the East End would be receiving an invitation right about now to whatever delightful concert Quogue Chamber Music had planned for September.

Unfortunately, historical norms are out the window this summer, and QCM’s September concert has become yet another cultural casualty of the coronavirus pandemic. This week’s email blast from Quogue Chamber Music delivered the dark news with at least a small beam of light appended: “As has been the case with major orchestras and other cultural institutions, we, too, have sadly had to cancel our September concert. We have booked the same group for next September, in the expectation that by then it will be safe to gather indoors again to enjoy live music.”

Ever hopeful, QCM explored the possibility of presenting an outdoor concert this summer, in lieu of using the Community Hall. That idea came to naught, however, due to current prohibitions against gatherings of more than 50 people, the expenses involved, the risk that the weather might not cooperate, acoustic challenges, and the very reasonable reluctance shared by many to attend any sort of gathering where the risk of infection far outweighs the reward, no matter how great that reward might be.

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Beachfront post Isaias. —Lynn Joyce Photo

 Generous support from patrons and a grant from the Huntington Arts Council enabled Quogue Chamber Music to schedule three spring performances for elementary school children in Hampton Bays, East Quogue and at the Quogue School. All three concerts had to be canceled, or at least postponed, when the schools were closed in March. The group is currently exploring ways to bring chamber music to young children virtually, working with the same group of young musicians who were supposed to perform live at the schools.

That’s the way things are in the world of arts and culture and across the board as our village, our nation, and the world struggle to come to terms with Covid-19 and all the attendant devastating fallout. Some non-profits—such as the Quogue Library, the Wildlife Refuge, and the Quogue Historical Society—have been able to adapt somewhat to virtual platforms to offer a rich (albeit necessarily limited) program of offerings in order to maintain an interactive, though diminished, public profile. 

Others—like Quogue Chamber Music, the Hampton Theatre Company, and the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, to name only a few—have identities and missions that depend for their very existence on engaging with live audiences, typically indoors and almost always numbering way more than 50 people.  

It is a huge credit to Quogue Village residents and the greater East End community that all the nonprofits dedicated to enriching the cultural experience of living here, as well as those delivering critically important human services—the hospitals in Southampton and Riverhead, East End Hospice, local food pantries—continue to receive steadfast support, even when the pandemic makes it challenging or downright impossible for them to fulfill their missions. 

So, a hearty cheer and a round of vigorous applause to all the nonprofits that are soldiering on in these difficult times, and to all the supporters who continue to stand by them and keep them going. There’s a lot to be learned from the commitment and generosity of spirit on both sides of this equation. 

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.

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This fallen tree stretched its cradle of power lines at the intersection of Beach Lane and Quogue Street. —A. Botsford Photo

Wildlife Refuge Program Today Is All About Bats
Probably still time to register for the Quogue Wildlife Refuge all-bats virtual program today, Thursday, August 6, at 4 p.m.

The 45-minute “Bats!” Zoom program for children and adults will be all about bats, including their anatomy and amazing physical adaptations, and the various lifestyles—swinging, studious, ascetic, to name only a few—of bats from all over the world, including Long Island, and their ecological importance to the planet.Bats 

The program will also detail some important ways to help local bats. The fee is $5 per family; register by clicking here, or go to www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, find the Events Calendar under Programs, and click on “Bats! (Virtual Program).” 

Please remember, too, that the Wildlife Refuge continues to struggle during the pandemic, like all the non-profits that create our special quality of life in Quogue. To make donations, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. 

All are also invited to try out the new Quogue Wildlife Refuge “text to donate” app for smart phone users. Donations to the QWR can now be made from anywhere simply by texting QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a very simple donation form, right on their cell phones. 

Fiona Davis Up Next in Library’s Author Series
The third installment of the 2020 Conversations with the Author series on Sunday, August 9, at 5 p.m. will feature Fiona Davis, author of, most recently, “The Lions of Fifth Avenue.” 

Ms. Davis, who has four other novels to her credit, will read from her work before engaging in a conversation with At Quaquanantuck columnist Andrew Botsford. Following the discussion, there will be an opportunity for members of the Zoom audience to ask questions, relayed to the author by Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom.

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Fiona Davis —Deborah Feingold Photo

A graduate of the College of William & Mary now based in New York City, Fiona Davis—like last Sunday’s author, Amy Poeppel—began her career as an actress, working on Broadway, Off-Broadway, and in regional theater. 

After earning her master’s degree at Columbia Journalism School, she fell in love with writing, switching from editor to freelance journalist before settling down to write historical fiction. Her previous novels are: “The Dollhouse”; “The Address”; “The Masterpiece”; “The Chelsea Girls,” all of which have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

Adriana Trigiani, New York Times bestselling author of “The Shoemaker’s Wife,” wrote that in the author’s latest novel, “The magnificent Fiona Davis has written a page turner for book lovers everywhere! I was on the edge of my seat as Laura Lyons, the ambitious essayist, breaks down social barriers and finds herself adrift in her own life at the end of the Belle Epoque in 1913 New York City.The+Lions+of+Fifth+Avenue

“Secrets are revealed eighty years later by her granddaughter, who found her way into the family business, working at the New York Public Library. This is a story of family ties, their lost dreams and the redemption that comes from discovering truth.”

The starred review in Publishers Weekly notes that “Davis delves into the history of the New York Public Library in this delightful mystery … The characters and story are stellar, but the real star of the show is the library, which Davis evokes beautifully.”

This year’s series has been organized by Quogue Library volunteer Ellen de Saint Phalle. Thanks to the generosity of this summer’s guest authors, participation in the 2020 Author Series programs is free and available by registering for each week’s program at QuogueLibrary.org

The authors’ books are available for sale at QuogueLibrary.org and at the library’s temporary location at 4 Midland Street during curbside service hours. A portion of the proceeds will support the library through the generosity of Bookhampton Bookstore. “The Lions of Fifth Avenue” can also be purchased by clicking here

The final author in this summer’s series will be Cara Wall, author of “The Dearly Beloved,” on Sunday, August 16. All Conversations with the Author programs begin at 5 p.m. 

For more information, email Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom at jbloom@quoguelibrary.org.

FPA Discussion Looks at U.S. versus Central America on Immigration
The Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program, sponsored by the Quogue Library and moderated this summer on Zoom by Susan Perkins and David Rowe, will tackle the issue of “U.S. Relations with the Northern Triangle”  at 5 p.m. on Saturday, August 8. To register, click here, or go to the Quogue Library website, www.quoguelibrary.org, and click on the Great Decisions flier on the home page. 

Combating illegal immigration has become a priority of the Trump administration. A special target of the administration is the Northern Triangle of Central America—Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala—which holds the nations responsible for the most populous flow of migrants from Latin America to the U.S. Migrants on the move

For many years, migrants have cited the lack of even subsistence economic opportunity in their home countries as the principal reason for trying to emigrate to the U.S. That’s why, historically, the U.S. has offered economic aid to countries in the Northern Triangle: to address the root cause of so many people trying to make their way to the U.S. in search of employment. 

After a short video on the subject, Saturday’s discussion will examine this challenging question: Now that funds from the U.S. have been cut, how can the Northern Triangle countries be expected to curtail migration? 

This year’s FPA Briefing Book is available for purchase in digital form from the FPA website, www.fpa.org, or by clicking here. The FPA website also has a complete list of topics for this year’s Great Decisions Discussions. 

The Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program provides background information and policy options for the eight most critical issues facing America each year, serving as the focal text for discussion groups across the country. For more information, visit www.fpa.org

Mercedes Matter Award for Artist Claudia Doring Baez
A painting by Quogue artist Claudia Doring Baez was recently selected by two noted New York City gallerists—Miles McEnry of McEnry Gallery and Gwenolee Zürcher of Zürcher Gallery—as the winner of a Mercedes Matter Award.

Claudia Doring Baez
Artist Claudia Doring Baez

The painting, titled “Brassaï, Paris—Gala At The Opera For Harper’s Bazaar 1935-37,”  is included in the New York Studio School Alumni Association’s “2020 Alumni Exhibition,” which has been extended on Artsy to August 30, 2020. The exhibition features works from every decade of the school’s history created by 216 alumni born between 1930 and 1993. 

Underscoring the significance of the annual alumni exhibition and the Mercedes Matter Awards, according to the school’s website, is the fact that one of its founding principles, espoused by both founding Dean Mercedes Matter and Dean Graham Nickson, was the understanding that it takes time and commitment for an artist to truly arrive at something significant. 

Other judges tasked with selecting this year’s Mercedes Matter Awards included Christine Berry from Berry Campbell, Paul Efstathiou from Hollis Taggart, and Catherine Bernath and Madeleine Mermall from Public Swim.

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Claudia Doring Baez, “Brassaï, Paris -Gala At The Opera For Harper’s Bazaar 1935-37,” 2020, Oil on canvas, 14 × 11 in. —Image courtesy of New York Studio School

Quogue Library Programs Crowd the Calendar
Even when limited to the virtual realm, August is still a busy time for Quogue Library programs. 

Exotic bugs, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals will all be part of the live animal show (on Zoom) on Friday, August 7, at 7 p.m., offered as part of the interactive virtual nature and science presentations of the Wildlife Diversity Series from the Center for Environmental Education & Discovery (CEED). 

Led by Ranger Eric Powers, the presentation will introduce his Animal Ambassadors and examine where in the world these creatures come from and the different special adaptations they have developed. 

The Adult Book Club meets on Zoom this Sunday, August 9, at noon to discuss “The Night Watchman” by Louise Erdich. 

The newly formed Anti-Racism Book Club will continue its Zoom discussion of “So You Want to Talk About Race” by Ijeoma Oluo in meetings at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, August 11, and Tuesday, August 25. 

On Friday, August 14, at 3 p.m. the library, in association with the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, will host “Let’s Talk Hummingbirds.” The family program will offer information about local hummingbird species and offer tips on how to attract them to the backyard. 

To register for any of these programs, go to www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the appropriate flier for Zoom login registration.

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Rising tide. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Justice Court Update: Vehicle Break-In Case Adjourned to September 8
The arraignment of Oscar N. Mayen-Orrego of Riverhead, on charges stemming from multiple incidents of petit larceny and attempted petit larceny on June 22, has been postponed for a second time.  

Originally scheduled for Monday, July 6, the arraignment date was changed to August 3 due to Covid-19 restrictions on the use of the courtroom. The case has now been adjourned to Tuesday, September 8, at 9 a.m. in the Quogue Village Justice Court so that Mr. Mayen-Orrego can obtain legal representation. 

Although an arrest was made and arraignment is scheduled, the investigation is ongoing. A Quogue Village Police Detective is still actively working on the case, and additional charges may be brought forward, pending results on some evidence submissions made to the Suffolk County Lab. Anyone with any information about the case is asked to call 631-653-4791, or email DHartman@villageofquogueny.gov.

Meanwhile, a QVPD spokesman reiterated this week the advice issued previously that residents be sure, at minimum, to lock their vehicles and house doors (including basement access) at night.

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CLARIFICATION: A photo in last week’s At Quaquanantuck showed Quogue Gallery owners Chester and Christy Murray and artist Patricia Udell without their masks on, which at least one reader found disturbing. Since they were holding their masks in their hands, the caption should have made note that they had doffed the face coverings only momentarily for the photograph, thus perhaps reassuring anxious readers that the Quogue Gallery remains committed to practicing safe social distancing and other coronavirus protocols at all times. At Quaquanantuck regrets the oversight. —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Quogue Gallery’s Patricia Udell Exhibition On View through August 13
Art lovers have one more week to check out “Patricia Udell: Color, Space and the Female Form,” featuring the artist’s gouache paintings as well as her plaster reliefs, remains on view at the Quogue Gallery through August 13. .

The artist’s body of work explores color, space and the female form across a variety of media. She started with a series of small bronze sculptures exploring the female form before progressing beyond the figurative in favor of more abstracted examinations of shape, line and negative space in a series of monochromatic plaster reliefs and painted reliefs of corrugated cardboard and wood. 

The artist then progressed to a series of colorful, flat gouache paintings. In compositions that echo her sculpture, she blurs the distinction between form and negative space by assembling vibrant bands of color running up and down the paper in what she describes as a “back and forth” between gesture and positive and negative space. 

For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com

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Sturgeon moon. —Ginny Rosenblatt Photo

Rev. Robert Dannals Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Dr. Robert S. Dannals will officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, August 9, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Now in his 18th season at the Church of the Atonement, Rev. Dannals is Senior Associate Rector at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

Reverend Dannals will officiate at the Atonement’s Morning Prayer services through Sunday, August 16.

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

Contributions Welcome
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

The Long Haul

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North, Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin. 

That’s 36 states. Almost three-quarters of our nation. As of July 29, under Governor Cuomo’s latest Covid-19 Travel Advisory issued in conjunction with New Jersey and Connecticut, persons traveling to New York from any of these states are required to quarantine for 14 days upon their arrival. The list is updated regularly and the guidelines for self-quarantining at https://ny.gov/states.

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Summer sunset, July 26, 2020. —A. Botsford Photo

For anyone who might have gotten distracted by summer recreational opportunities and the current low infection rate hereabouts, At Quaquanantuck offers this dutiful reminder of what should be glaringly obvious: This is serious, folks. And it’s not going away anytime soon. 

In the early days of the pandemic, based on the horror unfolding right in front of us in New York City and the uncertainty born of the terrifying lack of knowledge about the virus and how it is transmitted (which continues to this day), appropriately fearful East Enders stayed home, washed hands, disinfected all surfaces, gloved up and donned masks when they needed to make a sortie, and generally took every precaution. They did this both to protect themselves and to do their part for the common cause of flattening the curve and relieving some of the strain on maxed out first responders and emergency medical services. 

There was also the vague sense in those first weeks after the infection and death rates in New York started to taper off that there would, at some point, be an end date: a time in the indefinite future that things would open up again and slowly but surely return to what we had come to believe was “normal.” 

Like movie footage shot through a telephoto lens, the end date continually appeared to be getting closer even as it remained at an indefinite remove in the future. We entered a “virtual” world for meetings, movies, music and theatre, which is to say an unsatisfactory simulacrum of the real thing.  The arrival of summer and the phases of New York Forward, along with the sense that fewer and fewer people on eastern Long Island were getting infected offered hope of a return to something resembling normalcy, but look around: 

We had Memorial Day and Fourth of July holiday weekends, but without parades, memorial services, or professional fireworks … not really. We can go to specialty shops again, but mask requirements and limits on the number of customers allowed inside drive home the fact that it’s anything but normal.

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Queuing up for Covid-19 testing at Southampton Urgent Care, 9:30 a.m., July 22, 2020. —A. Botsford Photo

Professional golf tournaments end with the winner’s traditional fist pump … for cameramen, with no crowd roar or applause. The Boys of Summer of Major League Baseball returned for an abbreviated season in empty stadiums with cutouts of fans behind home plate staring out blankly at the pitcher, their silence practically shouting: “This ain’t the real thing.” And now, with 17 players on the Miami Marlins testing positive for Covid-19, the mutant season is already stumbling toward an epic fail. 

Getting students back to school as soon as possible for in-person instruction is touted as the key to economic recovery, but no one feels confident about understanding the risks, or the safest way, or time, to do that. 

And now the rate of infection in 36 states is high enough to require travelers arriving in New York to self-quarantine for 14 days. Every indicator tells us this thing is far from over, even if or when an effective vaccine is developed. 

Last week, At Quaquanantuck briefly considered the idea of resilience, which is one of the qualities that is proving to be as essential as we struggle to make our way through this pandemic as it will be as we try to tackle issues of systemic racism, social justice, and inequality. But resilience alone can’t carry the day in either case. What’s needed now—once we accept that we’re in both these struggles for the long haul, that there will be no magical flip of a switch—is resolve. 

Just because we don’t see anyone in our separate bubbles, or our village bubble, getting sick, it doesn’t mean that Covid-19 has gone away, or that it’s only a problem somewhere else. And the same is true for the toxic effects of long term ingrained racism. Each and every one of us has to resolve to do whatever it takes, for as long as it takes, to be part of the solution. That’s the only way we can have any chance of eliminating any problem.  

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.

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A parasail aviator swung by the beach in Quogue last week. —Andrew Baris Photo

Sharks Everywhere You Look
As many readers indubitably already know, in an uncanny precision of timing that smacks of the mystical, right in the middle of the Quogue Library’s first annual Shark Week, a large shark was spotted on Wednesday morning in the ocean about 150 feet beyond the buoys at the Quogue Beach Club. 

The sighting was made by Stuart Disston, who was on his paddleboard at the time. He thought at first that he had spotted a dolphin as there were several in the area. Then he saw the approximately 20-inch high distinctive dorsal fin knifing through the surface as the fish circled back toward him. 

This was on the same morning that the Times and other news outlets were reporting a fatal shark attack in Maine, the state’s first, and there were reports of other sharks near the beach on the Long Island coastline to our west. All of which, added to the number of shark attacks last summer just a few miles to our north on Cape Cod, should serve to make ocean swimmers a bit wary, if not downright uncomfortable.

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Shark on Midland. —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Meanwhile, as the colorfully decorated cutouts on Jessup Avenue and Midland will attest, the library’s first shark week is now in full swing. The library has launched a dedicated Shark Week web page, at www.quoguelibrary.org/shark-week, jam packed with links to shark resources, articles, and activities. 

Today, Thursday, July 30, Miss Pat’s Shark Storytime and craft is scheduled at 11 a.m., and then there will be a “Sharks and Oceans Rock!” virtual under-the-sea tour at 4 p.m. 

The “Sharks & Oceans Rock” program at 4 p.m. will offer an up-close view of animals and sea life, including “sharks, crabs, the blobfish and more.” Register and get Zoom login information by clicking on the flier at quoguelibrary.org. Blobfish?

 These sharks will be summering in Quogue and on display through August, courtesy of the Quogue Library. —Lulie Morrisey Photos


As July yields to August, remember that the Quogue Library is sponsoring Leisa M. DeCarlo’s free Zoom fitness classes for adults, with a Pilates Mat class offered on Mondays at 10 a.m. and a Sculpting + Cardio series on Tuesdays at 10 a.m. 

Meanwhile, at 10 a.m. on Fridays in August, the library is offering Zoom Yoga with Jillian

To register and obtain Zoom login information for any of these programs—or other virtual programs offered by the library—patrons can go to the library’s home page at www.Quoguelibrary.org; click on the flier image of the program for which they wish to register; fill in the requested information; scroll to the bottom of the page (remembering to check “I am not a Robot”) and hit Register. A confirmation email with Zoom login information will be sent to all registered patrons. 

For more information, visit www.quoguelibrary.org, or contact info@quoguelibrary.org

Amy Poeppel Up Next in Library’s Author Series
The second installment of the 2020 Conversations with the Author series on Sunday, August 2, at 5 p.m. will feature Amy Poeppel, author of, most recently, “Musical Chairs.” 

Ms. Poeppel, the author of two other novels, “Limelight” and “Small Admissions,” will read from her work before engaging in a conversation with At Quaquanantuck columnist Andrew Botsford. Following the discussion, there will be an opportunity for members of the audience to ask questions.

Amy Poeppel
Amy Poeppel

Perhaps the best precis of her new novel that At Quaquanantuck came across was provided by Pamela Klinger Horn of Excelsior Bay Books, writing for Literature Lovers’ Night Out: “The summer holiday Bridget Stratton did not expect may turn out to be just what she needs. Bridget’s children have returned home, her musical trio is only a duet, her aging father has decided to re-marry, and the house is falling apart. A season of chaos may, however, strike just the right note in this game of life.”

New Yorker staff writer Hilton Als, the author of “White Girls,” described “Musical Chairs” as “trenchant, funny, and observant … as a prose artist Ms. Poeppel leaves nothing to be desired, except this desire: that she write more and more.”

This year’s series has been organized by Quogue Library volunteer Ellen de Saint. Phalle. Thanks to the generosity of this summer’s guest authors, participation in the 2020 Author Series programs is free and available by registering for the program at QuogueLibrary.org.Poeppel Novel 

The authors’ books are available for sale at QuogueLibrary.org and at the library’s temporary location at 4 Midland Street during curbside service hours. A portion of the proceeds will support the library through the generosity of Bookhampton Bookstore. “Musical Chairs” can also be purchased by clicking here

Mayor’s Corner: On the Water Front
In two recent emails to Quogue residents, Mayor Peter Sartorius has zeroed in—after taking a crack at an incontrovertibly impossible mission—on a few existentially significant water issues, both fresh and salt. 

First, though, the impossible mission. While most adults around the village are clearly making an effort to wear masks and maintain at least a modicum of social distance, it seems apparent to even the most casual observer that young people by and large seem unable or unwilling to wear masks, keep any distance greater than two feet from each other, or to gather, chat, hobnob, walk, lie on the beach, or otherwise behave in any way other than they have always done when seeing their friends during the summer. 

In a heroic effort to turn the tide of this generational recalcitrance, the Mayor offered a catalogue of convincing justifications for following social distancing protocols that he had received from a friend, listed as ways to complete this sentence: “When I wear a mask in public, or decline an invitation to a party or to come inside, I want you to know that:”

Space will not allow listing all of them here, but two favorites were: 

“I don’t feel like the ‘government is controlling me;’ I feel like I’m being a contributing adult to society and I want to teach others the same.”

“The world doesn’t revolve around me. It’s not all about me and my comfort.”

The message from the Mayor’s friend concluded with what one hopes is a rhetorical question for those who would eschew the wearing of a mask or other social distancing protocols:

“When you think about how you look, how uncomfortable it is, or what others think of you, just imagine someone close to you—a child, a father, a mother, grandparent, aunt, or uncle—choking on a respirator, alone without you or any family member allowed at bedside. Ask yourself if you could have sucked it up. Was it worth the risk?” 

At Quaquanantuck is hoping that readers of the Mayor’s email and this column will share these rationales, and that those with whom they share them will in turn share them with others. It may not be possible to overcome young people’s categorical belief in their own invulnerability, or to convince them to advance the safety and well-being of their families and society at large to the top of their list of priorities. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try.

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Morning ebb tide. —A. Botsford Photo

The water related topics addressed by Hizzoner start with the most immediate issue, namely the current drought. Last week, the Mayor received the following message from the Suffolk County Water Authority (SCWA), for dissemination to village residents: 

A prolonged period of hot and dry weather is currently underway and the Suffolk County Water Authority is experiencing unprecedented demand for water. I am asking all village residents to help by immediately changing the settings on your irrigation controllers so they water every other day, not every day. I also ask that you adjust watering times so that your systems do not operate during the 3 a.m. to 7 a.m. hours. Also, please consider purchasing a rain sensor for your system so you are not watering when it’s not necessary to do so.”

As the hot and dry weather has continued, this week Governor Cuomo put Long Island and some other areas of the state on a drought watch, the first of four levels of advisories: watch, warning,  emergency, and disaster. While there are no statewide mandatory water use restrictions in place under a drought watch or warning, all residents are strongly encouraged to voluntarily conserve water. Bear in mind that SCWA is permitted to impose water use restrictions depending upon local needs and conditions. 

On the pressing saltwater issue of beachfront erosion, the Mayor reported in last week’s email that a major milestone had been reached for the Fire Island to Montauk Point (FIMP) project by the signing of the Report of the Chief of Engineers of the Army Corp of Engineers. The principal elements of the report affecting Quogue are the planned periodic dredging to pass sand westward around the jetties at Shinnecock Inlet and the nourishment of the beach in East Quogue extending into the eastern part of Quogue.

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Got scraps? —Paula Prentis Photo

The Mayor believes he has been successful in convincing the Army Corps of Engineers that the beach conditions around the Quogue Village Beach require attention and should be included in the project.  If the Army Corps agrees to attend to erosion in this area, a necessary quid pro quo will be to allow some public access parking at the Village Beach to be agreed upon with the Town of Southampton. 

While this is significant progress, there are still more steps to be taken and hurdles to clear before any dredging or beach nourishment will be done. Which likely means getting through at least one more winter before any FIMP remediation gets underway. 

In this week’s email, the Mayor addressed saltwater issues on the bay side, namely the serious problem of poor water quality in local bays, mainly caused by nitrogen loading from septic systems and cesspools. One of several initiatives undertaken to address the problem is a study by Dewberry, an engineering consulting firm engaged by New York State to find ways to improve the water quality in western Shinnecock Bay, the area from Shinnecock Inlet west through Quantuck Bay and into Moniebogue Bay. 

Dewberry considered 15 options ranging from dredging to different forms of water exchange to improve flushing between the Atlantic Ocean and the bay. So far, the Mayor reported, Dewberry has narrowed the field down to three options warranting further study.  One involves a buried pipe under Dune Road to the east of Quogue creating a one-way flow from the ocean into the bay; two others involve actual cuts east of Quogue in the barrier island, one seasonal and one permanent. 

Buried pipe alternatives nearer to or in Quantuck Bay appeared to be effective, the Mayor wrote, but were not considered viable because of the high level of developed private property in the vicinity.  

The Pre-Screening Study Summary written by Dewberry is posted on the Announcements page of the Village website and can be accessed here: www.villageofquogueny.gov/polAnnouncements.cfm.

For complete details on these and other topics addressed in Hizzoner’s emails, go to www.villageofquogueny.gov and click on Announcements. Once again, to receive Hizzoner’s email blasts, send an email to ABuhl@villageofquogueny.gov and ask to be put on the email list.

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Morning glory. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Going Batty with Wildlife Refuge; Yoga in the Great Outdoors
There is big, capital letters LOVE for bats over at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. Which helps to explain why the Refuge is offering an all-bats virtual program on Thursday, August 6, at 4 p.m.

The 45-minute “Bats!” Zoom program for children and adults will be all about bats, including their anatomy and amazing physical adaptations, the various lifestyles—who knew bats had lifestyles?—of bats from all over the world, including Long Island, and their ecological importance to the planet.

Bat QWR
Bat photo courtesy Quogue Wildlife Refuge

The program will also detail some important ways to help local bats. The fee is $5 per family; register by clicking here, or go to www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, find the Events Calendar under Programs, and click on “Bats! (Virtual Program).” 

Don’t forget that Amy Hess will be offering “Earth Yoga Outside” in a socially distanced format at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesdays in August. 

The one-hour class is held in a large outdoor space on woodchips overlooking the pond. Participants are asked to bring a sheet or blanket and as well as a yoga mat. Because the class is outdoors, participants should consider applying sunscreen and insect repellent and should dress appropriately for the meteorological conditions. 

The Wednesday outdoor sessions are currently limited to nine people, and the fee is $15 per class. Class is weather-permitting and registrants will be refunded if class is cancelled. Pre-registration and pre-payment is required; register here or go to www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, find the Events Calendar under Programs, and click on the Earth Yoga Outside. For more information, call 631-653-4771. 

All are asked to please remember that the Wildlife Refuge continues to struggle during the pandemic, like all the non-profits that create our special quality of life in Quogue. To make donations, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. 

All are invited to try out the new Quogue Wildlife Refuge “text to donate” app for smart phone users. Donations to the QWR can now be made from anywhere simply by texting QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a very simple donation form, right on their cell phones.

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Left to right, Quogue Gallery owners Chester and Christy Murray with Patricia Udell at the artist’s reception on July 25 at the gallery. —Lulie Morrisey Photo

Patricia Udell Exhibition On View at Quogue Gallery
“Patricia Udell: Color, Space and the Female Form,” featuring the artist’s gouache paintings as well as her plaster reliefs, remains on view at the Quogue Gallery through August 13. 

The artist’s body of work explores color, space and the female form across a variety of media. Starting with a series of small bronze sculptures exploring the female form, over time Ms. Udell progressed beyond the figurative in favor of more abstracted examinations of shape, line and negative space in a series of monochromatic plaster reliefs and painted reliefs of corrugated cardboard and wood.

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Patricia Udell, “Composition in All Colors,” 2019, Gouache on paper, 42″ x 52″. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

The artist further distilled this concept into a series of colorful, flat gouache paintings. In compositions that echo her sculpture, she blurs the distinction between form and negative space by assembling vibrant bands of color running up and down the paper in what she describes as a “back and forth” between gesture and positive and negative space. Each band of color is separated by a thin white line, reinforcing the impression that the shapes are individual units rather than a cohesive mass.

Describing her work as a “visual breath,” Ms. Udell  seeks to evoke an emotional response in viewers, stating that the joy she has for simplicity “allows the viewer to have a moment of happiness with nothing asked of them.”

For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com

Rev. Robert Dannals Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Dr. Robert S. Dannals will officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, August 2, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com

Now in his 18th season at the Church of the Atonement, Rev. Dannals is Senior Associate Rector at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

Reverend Dannals will officiate at the Atonement’s Morning Prayer services through Sunday, August 16.

Remembering David Lawrence
At Quaquanantuck offers condolences this week to the family and friends of longtime Quogue resident David Lawrence, who passed away peacefully in his sleep at his home in Quogue on July 24. 

David and his wife Hala first started coming to Quogue and fell in love with the village in the summer of 1978, as guests of one of his college classmates.

David Lawrence
David Lawrence

As his family wrote this week, and many among his wide circle of friends will remember, “David loved all that Quogue had to offer, especially playing tennis at the Field Club, afternoons at the beach, any and all cocktail parties, and dancing the night away with Hala on the Field Club dance floor. A devoted grandfather, he enjoyed teaching his grandchildren how to play tennis and swim in the ocean as well as cheering on the Leopards at Field Day.”

David, who was a very proud veteran U.S. Marine Corps officer, is survived by his wife, Hala; children, Phoebe and her husband John H. Erdman Jr., George, and David Bruce Lawrence Jr. and his wife Donna; his grandchildren, Anne Lawrence Wernig and her husband Patrick, Elizabeth Lee Erdman, John H. Erdman III, Henry M. Lawrence and Mimi Lawrence; and his great granddaughter, Jane Lawrence Wernig.

A private graveside service will be held for the family at the Quogue Cemetery and a celebration of his life is planned for 2021.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in David’s honor may be made to East End Hospice at www.eeh.org; the Quogue Wildlife Refuge at quoguewildliferefuge.org/; or to the Church of the Atonement (Quogue) at episcopalchurch.org/parish/church-atonement-summer-chapel-quogue-ny, or the charity of the donor’s choice.  

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com

Got News? Got Photos? Share ’em!
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Resilience

If At Quaquanantuck was to choose one word to characterize the response of village institutions, organizations, and businesses to the Covid-19 pandemic, it would have to be resilience.

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Inlet fishing. —A. Botsford Photo

From all the personnel at Village Hall to the men and women staffing the Fire and Police departments and the Post Office; from the businesses on Jessup Avenue, Midland and Quogue Street to the Wildlife Refuge, Historical Society, and Quogue Association; from the Quogue Junior Theatre Troupe and Quogue Chamber Music to the Hampton Theatre Company, a whatever-we-can-do spirit is the order of the day.

 And, of course, the Quogue Library—temporarily displaced and in the thick of a major makeover and renovation—stepped up its game from the beginning and has been out in front serving patrons of all ages and interests ever since. Case in point: the signature summer series of Conversations with the Author returns in a new Zoom format this weekend with Christopher Beha and will feature three more guest authors on successive Sundays until August 16.

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In just the first few days of the offer, the Quogue Market has already handed out more than 300 of the 500 free thermal mugs donated by the Quogue Association for customers who make a purchase of $25 or more. Mug owners also have the added benefit of paying $2 for a 15 oz. coffee fill-up instead of the standard price of $2.75, through Labor Day. —Mug Shot courtesy of Stefanie Beck

Library Author Series Moves from Tent to Internet
As new Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom pointed out this week, this year’s Conversations with the Author series will be “an unusual” one. And while this summer’s series will by necessity be brought to patrons in a virtual format via Zoom, she noted that the library board of directors and staff plan to hold the summer 2021 series under the tent at the renovated library, scheduled to reopen this fall. 

Building on the success of this longtime summer staple that has been graced by an extraordinary line-up of talented authors, this year’s series has been organized by Quogue Library volunteer, Ellen de Saint. Phalle. Ms. De Saint Phalle’s experience in planning events with publishers and agents enabled her to reach out to a diverse lineup of authors dealing with a wide range of subjects. 

The series kicks off on Sunday, July 26, at 5 p.m. with Christopher Beha, author of, most recently, “The Index of Self-Destructive Acts.” Following this summer’s format, Mr. Beha will talk about and read from his work and then have a conversation with At Quaquanantuck columnist Andrew Botsford. Following the discussion, there will be an opportunity for members of the audience to ask questions.

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Christopher Beha —Ira Lipke Photo

After serving in several other editorial positions, Christopher Beha is now the editor-in-chief of Harper’s Magazine, a post he has held at the revered monthly magazine of literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts since October 2019. As an author, his other works include a memoir, “The Whole Five Feet,” and two other novels, “Arts & Entertainments” and “What Happened to Sophie Wilder.”

Responding a few months back to a question from At Quaquanantuck as to what “The Index of Self-Destructive Acts” is about, Mr. Beha wrote in an email: 

As a writer, I always begin with the characters and their situation, so I would answer this question just by saying that the book is about a collection of people living in New York in 2009—soon after the financial crash and Obama’s election—dealing in various ways with the consequences of their own bad decisions. 

“Theme always comes later for me, but on that front I might say that it is about the limits of our efforts to remove human error from life, to predict the future, and to put our decisions on an entirely rational footing.”The Index of Self-Destructive Acts

For just one example of the early praise for the novel, Jonathan Dee, author of “The Locals,”wrote: “Beha is a sneaky-great plot-maker and thinker; by the time he wraps up this compassionate 21st-century tale of ambitious people looking for somewhere to place their faith―religion, statistics, love, money, country―you can see the clouds starting to gather into the moral Category 5 we’re currently enduring.”

Participation in the 2020 Quogue Library Author Series programs is free and available by registering for the program at QuogueLibrary.org. The authors’ books are available for sale at QuogueLibrary.org and at the library’s temporary location at 4 Midland Street during curbside service hours. A portion of the proceeds will support the library through the generosity of Bookhampton Bookstore. “The Index of Self-Destructive Acts” can also be purchased by clicking here

Other authors in this summer’s series include: Amy Poeppel, author of “Musical Chairs” on Sunday, August 2; Fiona Davis, author of “The Lions of Fifth Avenue” on Sunday, August 9; and Cara Wall, author of “The Dearly Beloved” on Sunday, August 16. All Conversations with the Author programs will be at 5 p.m. 

For more information, email Quogue Library Director Jenny Bloom at jbloom@quoguelibrary.org.

Quogue woman about town Liz Byrne recently took a “tour” of the village with her companion, McVet, adopted from the VFW after the property was sold. Above right, Sherry at the Post Office takes a ride on a properly masked McVet. Commenting on her tour, Ms. Byrne reported that while there has been significant change in the village, its beauty as measured by any standard remains gloriously intact.—Photos courtesy of Liz Byrne


Historical Society Illustrated Zoom Talk Tonight
Tonight, Thursday, July 23, at 6 p.m., Quogue Historical Society Curator and Southampton Town Historian Julie B. Greene will host the first in a planned series of  QHS Illustrated Talks via Zoom, “Then and Now: Pictorial Quogue, c. 1875 & 2020.”  

This first talk will take participants through a comparison of how parts of our village looked in the late 19th century as captured by George Bradford Brainerd versus the way they look today.  

Send an email to info@quoguehistory.org to see if you can still reserve a space in the Zoom room. 

And remember, now is the time to create or renew your membership and increase your donation to the Quogue Historical Society. Click here or visit quoguehistory.org/support/financial-contributions/

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Sunset bay light. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Quogue Gallery Reception for Patricia Udell
“Patricia Udell: Color, Space and the Female Form” is the title of the exhibition opening at the Quogue Gallery this week, with a reception planned at the gallery at 44 Quogue Street on Saturday, July 25, from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibition will feature the artist’s gouache paintings and as well as her plaster reliefs.

All those interested in attending the reception are asked to sign up for a preferred time slot by clicking here as gallery access will be limited to 10 guests at a time. Visitors must wear masks and practice social distancing. The exhibition is also available for viewing via the Quogue Gallery’s virtual gallery.

Patricia Udell’s body of work explores color, space and the female form across a variety of media. Early in her career, the artist created a series of small bronze sculptures exploring the female form. Over time, she progressed beyond the figurative in favor of more abstracted examinations of shape, line and negative space in a series of monochromatic plaster reliefs and painted reliefs of corrugated cardboard and wood.

Composition in Indigo and Pink, 2018, Gouache, 42_ x 60_
Patricia Udell, “Composition in Indigo and Pink,” 2018, Gouache, 42 x 60 inches—Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

 In these works, colorful, curvilinear bands streak vertically across a white background, creating a linear yet organic assemblage of shapes contained within an understood rectangular background. Each band curves and bends with angular crooks and semicircular arches, molding the negative space between the sculptural elements into shapes as dynamic as the plaster itself.

Ms. Udell further distilled this concept into a series of colorful, flat gouache paintings. Echoing the composition to her sculpture, the artist blurs the distinction between form and negative space by assembling vibrant bands of color running up and down the paper in what she describes as a “back and forth” between gesture and positive and negative space. Each band of color is separated by a thin white line, reinforcing the impression that the shapes are individual units rather than a cohesive mass.

Describing her work as a “visual breath,” Ms. Udell  seeks to evoke an emotional response in viewers, stating that the joy she has for simplicity “allows the viewer to have a moment of happiness with nothing asked of them.”

Patricia Udell received her bachelor’s degree in Design of the Environment and a BFA in Sculpture from the University of Pennsylvania. She lives and works in New York City and Quogue, New York.

The mission of the Quogue Gallery is to present a program of artistic excellence by showcasing the work of prominent, mid-career and emerging artists in the modernist tradition. Its core focus is on discovering and exhibiting figurative and abstract expressionist painters who are recognized historically as well as those of great promise whose work has not received the attention and critical response it so richly deserves. 

Since its founding in 2014, the Quogue Gallery’s place in the modern and contemporary art world has been widely acknowledged by the press. The gallery has been featured in many publications, including the New York Times, Dan’s Paper, Beach Magazine, Hamptons Art Hub, Artnet News, Southampton Press, and others. The gallery has also received critical recognition in reviews published by Hamptons Art Hub, Artnet News and other outlets. 

For more information, call 203-321-9427, email info@quoguegallery.com, visit quoguegallery.com

Library’s Shark Week Starts Monday, July 27
The Quogue Library Shark Week 2020 kicks off on Monday, July 27, with a self-scheduled stroll down Jessup Avenue and along the pond to view the sharks on display. 

On Tuesday, July 28, the library is asking all those who have registered to “Check your email—videos and fun shark information will swim into your inbox.” On Wednesday, July 29, at 3 p.m. a “Let’s Talk Sharks” program with the Quogue Wildlife Refuge will be offered on Zoom. On Thursday, July 30, Miss Pat’s Shark Storytime and craft is scheduled at 11 a.m., and then there will be a “Sharks and Oceans Rock!” virtual under-the-sea tour at 4 p.m. shark

Aimed at kids age 5 to 12, the “Let’s Talk Sharks” program with the Wildlife Refuge on Wednesday, July 29, at 3 p.m. will offer interesting facts and excellent info about sharks and participants will make a shark tooth necklace. Materials for the necklace can be picked up at the library’s Midland Street office during curbside hours; register and get Zoom login information by clicking on the flier at quoguelibrary.org.

The “Sharks & Oceans Rock” program on Thursday, July 30, at 4 p.m. will offer an up-close view of animals and sea life, including “sharks, crabs, the blobfish and more.” Register and get Zoom login information by clicking on the flier at quoguelibrary.org.

As July yields to August, remember that the Quogue Library is sponsoring Leisa M. DeCarlo’s free Zoom fitness classes for adults, with a Pilates Mat class offered on Mondays at 10 a.m. and a Sculpting + Cardio series on Tuesdays at 10 a.m. 

Meanwhile, at 10 a.m. on Fridays in July and August, the library is offering Zoom Yoga with Jillian

To register and obtain Zoom login information for any of these programs—or other virtual programs offered by the library—patrons can go to the library’s home page at www.Quoguelibrary.org; click on the flier image of the program for which they wish to register; fill in the requested information; scroll to the bottom of the page (remembering to check “I am not a Robot”) and hit Register. A confirmation email with Zoom login information will be sent to all registered patrons. 

For more information, visit www.quoguelibrary.org, or contact info@quoguelibrary.org

Rev. Robert Dannals Leads Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Dr. Robert S. Dannals will officiate virtually at four successive Morning Prayer services of the Church of the Atonement, starting on Sunday, July 26, at 9 a.m. and running through Sunday, August 16. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com for the Zoom meeting ID number and password. 

Now in his 18th season at the Church of the Atonement, Rev. Dannals is Senior Associate Rector at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida. He was for many years Rector at St. Michael and All Angels Church in Dallas, Texas, and he has served in interim ministry, as a guest preacher, and as a parish consultant.

Rev Dannals
Rev. Robert Dannals

 He earned his Master of Divinity from Virginia Theological Seminary, his Doctor of Ministry from Drew University in Madison, NJ and his PhD from the Graduate Theological Foundation in South Bend, IN. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler provides the music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

The Reverend Dr. Robert S. Dannals will officiate at the Atonement’s Morning Prayer services from  Sunday, July 26 through Sunday, August 16.

Remembering Edward S. Reid III
Edward S. “Ted” Reid III, of Quogue and Brooklyn Heights, who led a life devoted to his family, the communities in which he lived, and the organizations that he served, died peacefully in his Brooklyn Heights home on Friday, July 17. He was 90. 

Born March 24, 1930, in Detroit, Michigan, he was the second of three children of Margaret O. Reid and Edward S. Reid Jr. Ted earned his undergraduate degree at Yale University in 1951, becoming a member of Phi Beta Kappa and, after serving active duty in the U.S. Marine Corps in Korea from 1951 to 1953, he earned an LLB magna cum laude at Harvard Law School in 1956.

After graduating from law school, he began working at Davis Polk & Wardwell, becoming a partner in 1964 and remaining as a partner until his retirement in 1995, having served his last five years of active practice as head of the firm’s Tokyo office. During his career he also served on the board of directors of General Mills for 15 years and was a member of the New York City Board of Higher Education. 

Ted and his wife of 66 years, Carroll (née Grylls), raised their family in Brooklyn Heights. Devoted to Brooklyn and its institutions, he served on the board of directors of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden for 29 years and was a trustee of the Brooklyn Museum for 26 years, including five years as board chairman. He served on the board of directors of Bargemusic Ltd., an organization dedicated to holding musical performances at its East River venue. Ted had a passion for music and loved going to the Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic, in addition to concerts at Bargemusic.

Ted Reid
Ted Reid

He was also an active member of several social and cultural associations, including the Quoque Beach Club, the Quoque Field Club, the Shinnecock Yacht Club, and the Heights Casino, often serving in leadership roles, as well as the Century Association and the Rembrandt and Iphetonga clubs.

Ted ran five New York City marathons and continued to ski and play tennis well into his 70s, “at times heroically resisting the inevitable effects of time,” as his family recalled. Known to one and all as a “true gentleman,” Ted was as quick with a kind word and a smile as he was with remarks betraying his self-deprecating sense of humor. His daughter Carroll Highet recalled that he once wrote: “Armed for the first time with my 70-and-over handicap for the NASTAR ski races, I won a Silver medal after a lifetime of struggling and failing to get above a Bronze; this achievement was then put into perspective when I learned five minutes later that all four of my grandchildren old enough to ski had won Gold.” 

Ted lived a full and adventurous life, deeply engaged with his community and family, and he hoped for the same for his children and grandchildren. According to his family, when he reached his 70th birthday, he gathered them together and said, “I have received more of life’s blessings than anyone could reasonably ask or expect, and after reaching three score years and ten, I regard each additional day as a kind of bonus or dividend—I am delighted to have them, one day at a time, but life doesn’t owe me anything more.” 

His daughter Carroll spoke for the family when she wrote: “We are so glad he treasured life, and stuck around for another two decades!”

Serving on the board of directors of the Quogue Beach Club for many years, and as the club president from 1989 to 1991, like many Quogue residents, Ted enjoyed some of his greatest happiness at the beach. Family and friends—who knew him as both a gentleman and a gentle man—will remember seeing him frequently enjoying the view of the ever changing ocean, most days, his family said, if possible, with a cheese dog and a piece of orange cake.  

He will be greatly missed by many. Ted is survived by: his sister, Claudia; brother, William; wife, Carroll; children Carroll (and Mac) Highet, Richard (and Jill) Reid, Jenny (and Michael) McTigue, and Margaret (and Matt) Boyer; 12 grandchildren, and one great grandchild. A private graveside service will be held for family members on Thursday, July 30, at the Quogue Cemetery. 

In lieu of flowers, a donation in Ted’s honor may be made to the Quogue Wildlife Refuge quoguewildliferefuge.org/ or to the Church of the Atonement (Quogue) episcopalchurch.org/parish/church-atonement-summer-chapel-quogue-ny.   

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Now Is Still Then

Sometime in April, for no reason I can think of—probably procrastination to put off working on the column—I started going through a box full of folders that were salvaged from my late mother’s house when I and my siblings cleaned it out before eventually selling it.

Atl sunrise Jonathan Karen (2)
Atlantic sunrise. —Jonathan Karen Photo

In the box there were a number of folders full of my stepfather Richard Dougherty’s papers. A longtime journalist, novelist, and playwright, he also had a couple of jobs managing tricky public relations, most notably for the New York City police commissioner and, later—already up to his chin in Democratic politics—for the ill-fated presidential campaign of George McGovern in 1972.  

As I thumbed through one of his folders, a funeral card fell out. I picked it up and felt a pang when I realized it was from the funeral mass for Robert F. Kennedy, assassinated on June 6, 1968 when he was running for president. On one side, the card bears an image of a smiling RFK, slightly marred by a stain from a rusty paperclip; on the reverse, as is customary with this kind of memorial card, there is the text of a one-line prayer and a couple of hopeful lines quoted from Tennyson’s “Ulysses.”

IMG_6325 (2)
Robert Francis Kennedy

Then, remarkably, there are poignant, thoughtful, and positive quotes from Kennedy himself, taken from his extemporaneous remarks on the death of another victim of assassination, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., on the day that he was killed, just two months before, on April 4. 

I spent some time going through a whole gamut of emotions and thoughts as I read and re-read the card. Then I put it on my desk and didn’t think about it that much until I happened to glance at it about a week after the murder of George Floyd on May 25, when the ensuing protests and nationwide outcry pinned RFK’s words right in the middle of my consciousness. 

IMG_6328 (2)

So, why did I happen to go through those folders on that day? And why weren’t all the folders thrown out years ago, since that’s inevitably going to be their fate anyway? Not for me to figure out these things or even to ponder. 

I only know that here we are in another election year, 52 years later, and still we struggle with the pernicious issues around gun violence, social justice, racism and equality. And so it seemed appropriate to share this serendipitous find with At Quaquanantuck readers. As to Robert Kennedy’s words, I can only hope that one day we will all be able to speak with one voice to say: Amen. 

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.

Get Ready to Zoom into Quogue’s Past
Readers are reminded that next Thursday, July 23, at 6 p.m., Quogue Historical Society Curator and Southampton Town Historian Julie B. Greene will host the first in a planned series of  QHS Illustrated Talks via Zoom, “Then and Now: Pictorial Quogue, c. 1875 & 2020.”

1996.164.2-464_SL1
Circa 1875 view of Quogue Street (looking west) from Old Depot Road. —George Bradford Brainerd Photo courtesy of Quogue Historical Society

 This first talk will take participants through a comparison of how parts of our village looked in the late 19th century as captured by George Bradford Brainerd versus the way they look today.  

Brainerd captured 10+ images of Quogue in the mid-1870s that provide a portrait of the village’s early days, a long time before smartphone cameras, or even Brownies. 

The photographic collodion wet plate process used by Brainerd requires the photographic material—in Brainerd’s case glass plates—to be coated, sensitized, exposed and developed within the span of about 15 minutes, necessitating a portable darkroom for use in the field.

Brainerd snack
Brainerd, at right, with a fellow photographer, taking a break in Hempstead c. 1875. —Image courtesy of Quogue Historical Society

The process was arduous—Brainerd and his assistant would walk from the rail depot into each village and set up a tent as a darkroom. 

Send an email to info@quoguehistory.org to reserve a space in the Zoom room. The Zoom link to join will be emailed a week before the talk to those who register. 

Another new initiative from the Society is QHS At Home (quoguehistory.org/qhs-at-home), an update of the QHS website featuring a roster of virtual opportunities to explore Quogue history. Throughout the summer, the Historical Society will be adding online exhibitions, virtual tours, children’s activities, videos, and more.

Fans and supporters of the QHS are reminded: you can create or renew your membership by clicking here or by visiting quoguehistory.org/support/financial-contributions/. You’ll have the option to complete the Membership Reply Form and mail a check, or click on the donate button to pay with a credit card or PayPal.

Great Egret 2014 Shinn Inlet FM
Great egret at Shinnecock Inlet. —Florrie Morrisey Photo

Quogue Wildlife Refuge Needs Donations to Keep On Coming
The date for the Wild Night for Wildlife that was not to be has now gone by, but the QWR’s need for support continues every day. 

For those who might have missed it, the talented folks at the Refuge and some friends and supporters put together a lovely video about the QWR and the people who keep it going that you can see by clicking here, or by visiting this page on the Refuge website: quoguewildliferefuge.org/summerappeal/

As Refuge Executive Director Michael Nelson has noted, all donations help “to ensure that the Refuge is able to continue to provide quality care for our animals and priceless experiences in nature for the community.” To make donations, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. 

And please remember, too, the new Quogue Wildlife Refuge “text to donate” app for smart phone users. Donations to the QWR can now be made from anywhere simply by texting QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a very simple donation form, right on their cell phones.

Umbrella Parade Jennifer Beccia
Umbrella parade. —Jennifer Beccia Photo

Foreign Policy Association Looks at Modern Slavery
The Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion Program Virtual Conference via Zoom will be held on Saturday, July 18,  at 4:30 p.m. To register, click here, or go to quoguelibrary.org and click on the Foreign Policy Association flyer.  

Moderated by David Rowe, with Susan Perkins serving as facilitator, Saturday’s discussion will consider the horrifying fact that almost every nation has enacted laws criminalizing human trafficking, and international organizations, governments, and NGOs sponsor a large variety of projects to curb trafficking and slavery. 

Billions of dollars have been allocated to these efforts. What is the international community doing to combat slavery and trafficking? What are the experiences like for those being trafficked?

All are invited to pour a light refreshment, and connect to Zoom for a short film and a stimulating discussion.

The Great Decisions Briefing Book may be purchased at a discount from the library by emailing jbloom@quoguelibrary.org

Just When You Thought It Was Safe to Go to a Library Zoom …
Cartilaginous fish enthusiasts get ready for the Quogue Library Shark Week 2020 kickoff on Monday, July 27: a self-scheduled stroll down Jessup Avenue and along the pond to view the sharks on display. 

On Tuesday, July 28, the library is asking all those who have registered to “Check your email—videos and fun shark information will swim into your inbox.” On Wednesday, July 29, at 3 p.m. a “Let’s Talk Sharks” program with the Quogue Wildlife Refuge will be offered on Zoom. And on Thursday, July 30, Miss Pat’s Shark Storytime and craft is scheduled at 11 a.m., and then there will be a “Sharks and Oceans Rock!” virtual under-the-sea tour at 4 p.m. white shark

Aimed at kids age 5 to 12, the “Let’s Talk Sharks” program with the Wildlife Refuge on Wednesday, July 29, at 3 p.m. will offer interesting facts and excellent info about sharks and participants will make a shark tooth necklace. Register and get Zoom login information by clicking on the flier at quoguelibrary.org.

“Dinosaurs Rock” will lead the virtual under the sea tour in the “Sharks & Oceans Rock” program on Thursday, July 30, at 4 p.m. This science presentation and museum exhibit of life-size creatures will offer an up-close view of animals and sea life, including “sharks, crabs, the blobfish and more.” Register and get Zoom login information by clicking on the flier at quoguelibrary.org.

Other family programs offered by the library this summer include: a “Tour the Pollock-Krasner House with Joyce Raimondo” children’s tour on Wednesday, July 22, at 4 p.m.; and “Miss Pat’s Story Time” for children age 2 to 5 on Thursday mornings at 11 a.m. 

To register for any of these programs, go to quoguelibrary.org and click on the flier.

Final Week for Norman Carton; Patricia Udell Next at Quogue Gallery
This is the final weekend for “Norman Carton: 1950s & 1960s Works on Paper” at the Quogue Gallery. On view through July 20, the exhibition at the gallery at 44 Quogue Street, which can also be viewed in the Quogue Gallery’s virtual space, features 15 Norman Carton paintings in the north gallery.

NC Garance (No. 2369)
Norman Carton, “Garance (No. 2369), 1960, gouache on paper, 53 by 45 in. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

Writing about the exhibition, Charles A. Riley II, the Director of the Nassau County Museum of Art, noted that: “Norman Carton, with his academic training, his love of studio process and materials (he ground his own vivid pigments) and his mastery of art history, stuck to [a philosophy of] art as part of life. As these wonderfully painterly, quite often large and substantive works in gouache triumphantly show, there was plenty of room left to operate in the Abstract Expressionist style, especially when it came to color.”

To see the complete text of Riley’s essay on the exhibition, click here.

Next up at the Quogue gallery will be “Patricia Udell: Color Space and the Female Form,” on view July 21 through August 13, with a reception planned at the gallery on Saturday, July 25, from 4 to 7 p.m. The exhibition will feature the artist’s gouache paintings and as well as her plaster reliefs.

Patricia Udell’s body of work explores color, space and the female form across a variety of media. Early in her career, Udell created a series of small bronze sculptures exploring the female form. Over time, she progressed beyond the figurative in favor of more abstracted examinations of shape, line and negative space through a series of monochromatic plaster reliefs and painted reliefs of corrugated cardboard and wood.  

The artist further distilled this concept into a series of colorful flat gouache paintings. Similar in composition to her sculpture, she blurs the distinction between form and negative space by assembling vibrant bands of colors running up and down the paper in what Udell describes as a “back and forth between gesture, positive and negative space.”

For more information, call 203-321-9427, or email info@quoguegallery.com.

Rosenblatt grandkids
Ginny and Roger Rosenblatt had the great good fortune to have their six grandchildren visit during the week of July 4. Commandeering the lifeguard chair above are: Ryan Rosenblatt, Sam Solomon, Jess Solomon, James Solomon, Andrew Rosenblatt and Nate Rosenblatt.

Church of the Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Dr. Richard D. McCall will officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, July 19, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com for the Zoom meeting ID number and password. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler will provide music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

The Reverend Dr. Robert S. Dannals will officiate at the Atonement’s Morning Prayer services from  Sunday, July 26 through Sunday, August 16.

Film Suggestions from Performing Arts Center
For June and July, the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center is offering exclusive tickets to stream two movies written and directed by the celebrated South Korean filmmaker Hong Sangsoo, “Hill of Freedom” (2020) and “Woman on the Beach” (2008). 

Half the proceeds from ticket sales go to the PAC. For more information, trailers and tickets, along with links to companion commentary by Tuesday Night at the Movies host Andrew Botsford, click here or visit www.whbpac.org and click on Films. 

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Dislocated

After his conversation with the ghost on the ramparts—in which he learned that his uncle, having seduced his mother, was the murderer of his father—and he has been charged with avenging his father’s death, Shakespeare’s Danish Prince Hamlet sums up the situation most succinctly: “The time,” he says, “is out of joint.” 

It’s a wonderful metaphorical phrase that means exactly what it sounds like: dislocated, like “a bone that has slipped from its proper juncture with another bone”; utterly disordered.

Og Pond Sunset AB
Ogden Pond sunset. —A. Botsford Photo

It’s a phrase that has been coming up again and again for At Quaquanantuck as the Covid-19 pandemic makes its heedless way from nation to nation and across the United States: the time is out of joint. 

Curiously, in the early days of the most stringent restrictions, the time seemed way less out of joint than it does now. While it’s generally acknowledged that Governor Andrew Cuomo and other leaders in the tri-state area got started too late, when they finally began cracking down and imposing closures on non-essential businesses, entertainment, and amateur and professional sports, there was, to be sure, an abundance of almost pathological hoarding and plenty of hardships to go around, but at least there was a somewhat unified response to the danger of infection and the goal of flattening the curve. 

A healthy dose of fear, respect for the courage and sacrifice of medical workers and first responders, and adhering to state guidelines that were based on developing scientific analysis: all these combined to yield a reliably consistent response on the part of the majority of the populace. 

The result was a degree of confidence that if everyone followed the rules, not only would we flatten the curve, we could have at least a modicum of reassurance that we might be able to mitigate the threat of getting infected ourselves. That’s why the second half of March and the first part of April stand today as what one thoughtful reader wryly calls “the good old days.”  

But looking around and reading the news in late June and the beginning of July, it seems that once again all bets are off. An unholy stew of competing political, economic, and health care considerations, seasoned with a heaping dose of moral and ethical confusion, is apparently a tasty dish for the pandemic, which seems to be getting both fatter and hungrier every day on a steady diet of it. 

Mask or no mask; covering the nose and mouth or slung carelessly over the upper lip? Six feet? Three feet? Shoulder to shoulder? Face to face? Porous bubbles that allow for close-talking congregations of a dozen or more people from different households? In one household, it’s the younger people who seem unconcerned about the danger of not following protocols. In another, it’s the grownups who are throwing the loud and crowded parties. And this is in states that managed by strict observance of guidelines to flatten the curve a while back. It’s far worse in some of the states that never really closed or that reopened way too early. But then again, not all of them. 

Is it any wonder that many people who are sticklers for following the rules themselves are more afraid of getting infected now than they were back in the days when the curve was spiking in New York? The time is out of joint. O cursèd spite, who of us, and how, will set it right? 

And so it goes in the days of the novel coronavirus today.

Docker 2 James Solomon
Sunset splash at Dockers. —James Solomon Photo

More Graduates; More Heroes
At Quaquanantuck is grateful to correspondents who sent in word about two more heroes this week, secondary school graduates in the historic Covid class of 2020. 

As noted in columns over the past few weeks, members of this graduating class at the college and secondary school level have been badly shortchanged by the coronavirus pandemic. While nothing can make up for all they have lost, saluting them here at least provides some recognition of their accomplishments and, I hope, the sense that not only their families and friends, but the wider community has some understanding of what they have been denied and compassion for their plight, along with a great deal of pride in their making it across the finish line in spite of any and all obstacles. Heroes all.

Logan Flynn (2)
Logan Flynn

Logan T. Flynn, son of Gayle and Richard Flynn of Quogue and New York City, graduated from the Browning School in Manhattan on June 10. Logan will be attending the College of William and Mary in the fall.

Dylan Kostovick, grandson of Bob and Meredith Murray, graduated cum laude from Cape Cod Academy. Awarded the school’s Citizenship Prize, Science Prize, and Art Prize at the graduation ceremony, Dylan will attend UCLA in the fall.

 

Police News: Arraignment Postponed
Due to Covid-19 restrictions on the use of the Quogue Village Justice Court courtroom, the arraignment of Oscar N. Mayen-Orrego of Riverhead, on charges stemming from multiple incidents of alleged petit larceny and attempted petit larceny on June 22, has been postponed. 

Originally scheduled for Monday, July 6, the arraignment is now set for Monday, August 3, at 9 a.m. in the Quogue Village Justice Court. 

Village residents are reminded that although an arrest was made and arraignment is scheduled, the investigation is ongoing. Additional charges could be added if more victims come forward. Victims should contact the Quogue Police immediately if they have any suspicion that they were affected by this incident; call 631-653-4791, or email DHartman@villageofquogueny.gov.

Meanwhile, Lieutenant Daniel Hartman reiterated this week the advice issued previously by the Quogue Village Police that residents be sure, at minimum, to lock their vehicles and house doors (including basement access) at night.


QA Mug shot
The Quogue Market is now offering one of these attractive thermal mugs for free, compliments of the Quogue Association, with every purchase of $25 or more. In addition, anyone using one of these mugs will pay $2 for a 15 oz. cup of coffee instead of $2.75, through Labor Day. —Mug Shot courtesy of Stefanie Beck

Benefits of the Wildlife Refuge Are Actual; Only the Gala Is Virtual
While the coronavirus may have penned the annual QuogueWildlife Refuge Wild Night for Wildlife benefit into a virtual corner this year, At Quaquanantuck received confirmation once again this week that the myriad benefits associated with having the QWR as an identifying touchstone of our community are blessedly actual. 

It’s not just the serenity and natural beauty of the pristine landscape and trails, the vast array of flora and fauna, the caring for injured and permanently disabled wildlife, the guided walks and paddles, the camps in all seasons and educational programs for young and old, the centering and grounding programs (like Earth Yoga Outside with Amy Hess) and the spiritual safe space and respite afforded by the QWR and Gaia. All of these, and more, are the very real attributes that give the Refuge its special identity and help to make it the wonderful resource that it is, for Quogue residents and visitors from all over.

In the end, though, it’s the people—the executive director and all the staff, the dedicated members of the board of directors, and all the faithful volunteers—whose love of the Refuge and all it represents makes all the difference in rendering this natural gem such a special place for everyone.

Cecropia PP
Cecropia moth. —Paula Prentis Photo

A case in point: When faithful reader and column supporter Paula Prentis sent in this week’s stunning photograph of a beautiful broadwinged insect and inquired if this writer might know what it was, At Quaquanantuck knew instantly to whom I should turn. As she has on numerous occasions in the past, QWR Benefit Coordinator and Administrative Assistant Kimberly Stever (of slipper shell and brown lipped snail fame) responded immediately. 

Turns out not only did she know what this gorgeous creature is, she had once written about it in a newsletter article. Here is her response: 

“That is a Cecropia Moth! They are very beautiful creatures; we sometimes see them here at the Refuge.

“Here is an excerpt from a newsletter article I wrote about them a few years back:

“(Hyalophora cecropia) is another stunning example of a giant silk moth. They have large red, furry bodies and brown wings with varying bands and patterns of red, black and white. They have a wingspan of 5 to 7 inches, and are the largest moth in New York. These moths have no mouth parts (can’t eat), feature beautiful eyespots on their wings and the female produces a pheromone to attract males. Sound familiar? 

“Cecropia Moths and Luna Moths belong to the same family, Saturniidae, and share many important similarities. These moths spend the winter in their cocoons and emerge in the late spring and early summer.”

Cecropia caterpillar
Cecropia caterpillar

Not knowing that Kimberly had responded, QWR Associate Director Marisa Nelson also wrote back to At Quaquanantuck in a state of some excitement: 

“Utterly amazing!!! Who saw this, where and when??? (I am very curious as it is a great sighting.) It is a Cecropia Moth. Largest in NYS!

“So gorgeous and giant!”

Marisa also, as is the custom with scholarly responses, sent a link with more information that makes for fascinating reading: www.dec.ny.gov/docs/administration_pdf/butterfly.pdf.

She also attached an article written by a former QWR volunteer who used to raise and release Cecropia Moths. Any reader interested in seeing the article can write to Marisa at info@quoguewildliferefuge.org and she’ll send it along. Also fascinating reading. 

It’s this kind of comprehensive knowledge and research acumen—and willingness to share both—that demonstrates just one reason why the people associated with the QWR make such a monumental difference, and why it is so critically important for everyone to step up and make this year’s Wild Night for Wildlife summer appeal the most successful ever. 

As previously noted, the Wild Night for Wildlife gala has traditionally provided more than one third of the QWR’s operating budget. With no party this year, no sparkling live auction, no chance to meet and greet some of the QWR’s beloved resident animals, the Refuge is severely handicapped in its ability to make a pitch for major support from all of us. 

This is why it is so important for all the residents of Quogue and the surrounding area to step up and purchase a “virtual ticket” or make some kind of contribution to the Wild Night for Wildlife Summer Appeal.

Bill Ritter Jim Cramer C John Neely
Quogue Wildlife Refuge devotees and celebrity auctioneers Bill Ritter and Jim Cramer removed their masks and held their breath as they closed the social distance gap for this photo taken during a break in shooting their video promoting the Wild Night for Wildlife Summer Appeal. —C. John Neely Photo

The Conservator Award recipient for 2020 is Edwina Von Gal. Honorary chairs are: Sandy and Anthony Bonner, Jim Cramer and Lisa Detwiler, and Bill Ritter and Kathleen Friery. 

As Refuge Executive Director Michael Nelson has noted, all donations will help “to ensure that the Refuge is able to continue to provide quality care for our animals and priceless experiences in nature for the community.” To purchase virtual tickets and to make donations, click here or visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org and click on Wild Night Appeal. 

And please remember, too, the new Quogue Wildlife Refuge “text to donate” app for smart phone users. Donations to the QWR can now be made from anywhere simply by texting QWR2020 to 202-858-1233. The new app leads users to a very simple donation form, right on their cell phones.

This year’s virtual affair will feature a special celebratory YouTube video premiere at 7 p.m. on the night originally scheduled for the gala, Saturday, June 11. 

No Time Like the Present to Look into Quogue’s Past
As noted last week, the Quogue Historical Society has adapted its programming in the face of the coronavirus pandemic, with several new initiatives offering access to the 350+ years of Quogue history without breaching virus safety protocols: 

Coming up in two weeks, at 6 p.m. on Thursday, July 23, history and photography buffs won’t want to miss the Historical Society’s first in a planned series of  Illustrated Talks via Zoom, “Then and Now: Pictorial Quogue, c. 1875 & 2020.”  

QHS Curator and Southampton Town Historian Julie B. Greene will host the session, taking participants through a comparison of how parts of our village looked in the late 19th century—as captured by George Bradford Brainerd—versus the way they look today.

Brainerd Q street small
Quogue c. 1875 —George Bradford Brainerd Photo courtesy of the Quogue Historical Society

  As a release from the QHS explains, by the time of his death in 1887, civil engineer and amateur photographer George Bradford Brainerd had taken 2,500 photographs, mostly urban views of New York City. The 10-plus images Brainerd captured of Quogue in the mid-1870s document a portrait of the village’s early days, revealing—understatement alert!—a “stark contrast to the Quogue of today.”

Send an email to info@quoguehistory.org to reserve a space in the Zoom room. The Zoom link to join will be emailed a week before the talk to those who register. 

Another new initiative from the Society is QHS At Home (quoguehistory.org/qhs-at-home), an update of the QHS website featuring a roster of virtual opportunities to explore Quogue history. Throughout the summer, the Historical Society will be adding online exhibitions, virtual tours, children’s activities, videos, and more.

The Historical Society is also offering a new map-guided, self-scheduled (and socially distanced, of course) walking tour of Jessup Avenue. Maps loaded with historical fun facts and lore are available outside the Pond House to guide strollers through what the QHS is calling “Quogue’s bustling commercial, cultural, and civic center” on Jessup Avenue. 

Plans call for an online version of the map to  be posted on the QHS website. As restrictions ease, the Historical Society will explore the possibility of conducting walking tours for limited numbers of participants with appropriate safety measures. 

With all these lovely, and safe, programs on offer despite all the challenges the Society is facing because of the coronavirus pandemic, now is the time to create or renew your membership and increase your donation to the Quogue Historical Society. 

Like all the other nonprofits, the QHS has been forced by the pandemic to cancel (or recast in the virtual realm) its principal fund-raising events. That’s why, now more than ever, the Society needs all of our support to continue its mission “to collect, preserve, and interpret the history of Quogue in order to foster a deeper understanding and appreciation of the rich cultural and architectural heritage of the Village.” 

Create or renew your membership by clicking here or by visiting quoguehistory.org/support/financial-contributions/. You’ll have the option to complete the Membership Reply Form and mail a check, or click on the donate button to pay with a credit card or PayPal.


SG Gardiner Winifred (2)
Halsey and Stephen Green welcomed 7 lb. 6 oz. Gardiner Winifred Green to the family at 6:14 a.m. on Saturday, May 23. The new arrival, seen here comfortably racked out on dad’s forearm, is the second grandchild of Margaret Halsey (Pi) Gardiner.

 Quogue Library Going All Out for Shark Week
Fresh from the success of the Dress Your Own Scarecrow and Make Your Own Snowman campaigns from last fall and winter, the Quogue Library is gearing up to dress up the village downtown business district once again. 

This time out it’s sharks they’re after, all part of the promotion and celebration of the library’s upcoming first annual Shark Week 2020, from Monday, July 27, through Sunday, August 2. Great White Shark

With a tagline of “Immerse yourself in the wonders of SHARKS!” the designated week will offer opportunities for everyone in the family to “Discover cool things about these marine animals and their habitats. Enjoy links to videos, virtual tours, shark book rentals, games, story time, and hands-on activities.” 

The first activity, customizing a wooden shark for display along Jessup Avenue and around the pond, starts immediately. First step is to register by emailing info@quoguelibrary.org, as the number of available templates limits participation in shark decorating to just 20 families. 

All those who have reserved a shark can pick up their wooden cutouts beginning today, Thursday, July 9. All other registrants are invited to take part in all the other programs and activities being offered during the week.

Painted, decorated and dressed up sharks must be returned to the library by Saturday, July 25, and sharks will be on display from Monday, July 27, through Friday, September 4.  

All are encouraged to check the library website, quoguelibrary.org, for updates. So far, planned activities include: Shark Week 2020 kickoff on Monday, July 27, a self-scheduled stroll down Jessup Avenue and along the pond to view the sharks on display; Tuesday, July 28, “Check your email—videos and fun shark information will swim into your inbox”; Wednesday, July 29, at 3 p.m. a “Let’s Talk Sharks” program with the Quogue Wildlife Refuge; and Thursday, July 30, Miss Pat’s Shark Storytime and craft at 11 a.m., and “Sharks and Oceans Rock!” virtual under the sea tour at 4 p.m. 

Aimed at kids age 5 to 12, the “Let’s Talk Sharks” program with the Wildlife Refuge on Wednesday, July 29, at 3 p.m. will offer interesting facts and excellent info about sharks and participants will make a shark tooth necklace. Register and get Zoom login information by clicking on the flier at quoguelibrary.org.

“Dinosaurs Rock” will lead the virtual under the sea tour in the “Sharks & Oceans Rock” program on Thursday, July 30, at 4 p.m. This science presentation and museum exhibit of life-size creatures will offer an up-close view of animals and sea life, including “sharks, crabs, the blobfish and more.” Register and get Zoom login information by clicking on the flier at quoguelibrary.org.

Other family programs offered by the library this summer include: a “Tour the Pollock-Krasner House with Joyce Raimondo” children’s tour on Wednesday, July 22, at 4 p.m.; “Miss Pat’s Story Time” for children age 2 to 5 on Thursday mornings at 11 a.m.; and an Anti-Racism Book Club starting with a digital meet and greet on Tuesday, July 14, at 8 p.m. to plan for future discussions.

To register for any of these programs, go to quoguelibrary.org and click on the flier.

Osprey nest MM
Channel marker osprey nest. —Meredith Murray Photo

 Reception for Norman Carton Show Saturday at Quogue Gallery
Quogue Gallery owners Chester and Christy Murray will host a sequential reception—for 10 guests at a time, masked and practicing social distancing—from 4 to 7 p.m. on Saturday, July 11, for the second show of the gallery’s seventh season, “Norman Carton: 1950s & 1960s Works on Paper.” To sign up for a specific time slot, click here or visit https://calendly.com/quoguegallery/norman-carton.

On view through July 20, the exhibition at the gallery at 44 Quogue Street, which can also be viewed in the Quogue Gallery’s virtual space, features 15 Norman Carton paintings in the north gallery.

NC Larkline (No. 2293) QG
Norman Carton, “Larkline (No. 2293),” 1960, Gouache on paper, 19 x 24 in. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

Writing about the exhibition, Charles A. Riley II, the Director of the Nassau County Museum of Art, noted that: “Norman Carton, with his academic training, his love of studio process and materials (he ground his own vivid pigments) and his mastery of art history, stuck to [a philosophy of] art as part of life. As these wonderfully painterly, quite often large and substantive works in gouache triumphantly show, there was plenty of room left to operate in the Abstract Expressionist style, especially when it came to color.”

To see the complete text of Riley’s essay on the exhibition, click here.

Norman Carton was born in the Ukraine in 1908. Escaping the turbulence of civil war massacres, he settled in Philadelphia in 1922 after years of constant flight. In the 1920s, he attended the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art and the La France Art Institute located in Chicago. While in school, he worked as an illustrator for the Philadelphia Record in the company of other illustrator/artists who had founded the Ashcan School, one of the chief progenitors of modern American art. 

In the early 1930s, he studied fine art and received scholarships at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA) where he was particularly influenced by his teacher Henry McCarter, who was a pupil of Toulouse-Lautrec, Puvis de Chavanne, and Thomas Eakins. A Cresson European Traveling Scholarship awarded in 1934 enabled Carton to travel through Europe and study in Paris. There he expanded his artistic horizons with influences stemming from Matisse, Picasso, Soutine, and Kandinsky. 

When he returned to the United States, he completed his studies at PAFA and the Barnes Foundation. In the mid-1930s, Carton was awarded a Pennsylvania Academy Fellowship and won the Toppan Prize for figure painting as well as the Thouron Composition Prize.

Between 1939 and 1942, the Works Project Administration (WPA) employed Carton as a muralist collaborating with architect George Howe. During World War II, Carton was a naval structural designer and draftsman at the Cramps Shipbuilding Corporation (Camden, New Jersey). Here, he began to create semi-abstract and non-objective sculpture with metal. 

Carton had his first solo exhibition in 1949 at the Philadelphia Alliance. This show was followed closely by solo exhibitions at the Laurel Gallery (New York City) and Dubin Gallery (Philadelphia). At this time, his work was semi-abstract. In addition to painting, he taught classes at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and was a founder and the chairman of the Philadelphia chapter of Artist’s Equity Association.

NC Tropic Constellation QG
Norman Carton, “Tropic Constellation (No. 2370),” 1960, gouache on paper, 53 x 99 in. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

The Philadelphia Museum of Art and the organization of the National Museums of France commissioned Carton to travel to France in 1952 for a color study of continental masterpieces. He was granted access to study the restoration of the Mona Lisa and was one of the very few to be given permission to remove the painting from its frame. In 1952, he had solo exhibitions at the Sorbonne, Galerie d’Art, and Gallery Rene Breteau and was part of many group shows in Paris salons including Les Surindependants, Salon d’Automne, and Realities Nouvelles. 

The mid-1950s to the 1970s was a busy time for Carton, during which he had numerous solo exhibitions, was included in a number of prestigious group shows, and received a great deal of recognition. In 1962, with the aid of two other artists, he formed the Dewey Gallery, the first gallery in New York City owned and operated by artists. During his lifetime, Carton was in more than 135 group exhibitions and more than 20 one-man shows.

Considered a painter’s painter by his peers, Carton also was an educator, teaching at the New School for Social Research in New York City and lecturing at the Pratt Institute and the Chrysler and the Whitney Museums. He moderated panel discussions between prominent artists and educators, was president of the Rainbow Arts League, and appeared on radio interviews. Later, Carton also taught at Long Island University. 

The mission of the Quogue Gallery is to present a program of artistic excellence by showcasing the work of prominent, mid-career and emerging artists in the modernist tradition. Its core focus is on discovering and exhibiting figurative and abstract expressionist painters who are recognized historically as well as those of great promise whose work has not received the attention and critical response it so richly deserves. 

Since its founding in 2014, the Quogue Gallery’s place in the modern and contemporary art world has been widely acknowledged by the press. The gallery has been featured in many publications, including the New York Times, Dan’s Paper, Beach Magazine, Hamptons Art Hub, Artnet News, Southampton Press, and others. The gallery has also received critical recognition in reviews published by Hamptons Art Hub, Artnet News and other outlets. 

For more information, call 203-321-9427, or email info@quoguegallery.com

Church of the Atonement Virtual Service Sunday
The Reverend Dr. Richard D. McCall will officiate virtually at the Morning Prayer service of the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, July 12, at 9 a.m. All those wishing to obtain login information for the Zoom platform are requested to send an email to churchoftheatonementquogue@gmail.com for the Zoom meeting ID number and password. 

The Atonement, a mission of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, welcomes worshippers of all faiths. Atonement organist and choir director Patricia Osborne Feiler will provide music for the virtual Morning Prayer services. This Sunday’s 9 a.m. service will be recorded for later viewing on the church’s website (Quoguechurch.org). 

Rev. McCall, now in his 21st summer with the church, will also officiate at the Sunday services at 9 a.m. on July 19. The Reverend Dr. Robert S. Dannals will officiate at the Atonement’s Morning Prayer services from  Sunday, July 26 through Sunday, August 16.

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com.  

At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.