Giving Thanks

Honoring a promise made to the late Quogue Village Historian and keeper of the flame Pat Shuttleworth, At Quaquanantuck is happy to share once again—even if it’s not in newsprint that can be put up on the refrigerator anymore—its annual reflection on just a few of the many things for which all of us who are lucky enough to spend time in this blessed community can be truly grateful.

Morning light. —A. Botsford Photo

With so many challenges continuing to dog us as we attempt to navigate our way out of the pandemic and get past seemingly intractable political divides in order to address the burgeoning threats to our democracy and the very future of our planet, it is more important than ever that we understand just how fortunate we are to be living in Quogue, so that we might better show compassion and generosity to those who are not so blessed. 

With beachfront erosion a constant threat even under the best of circumstances, we can all be extremely thankful that 2021 was another off year for hurricanes making a direct hit on the eastern seaboard. Still, we must always honor the lessons of the past by remaining vigilant, heeding evacuation warnings, and following safety protocols when a major storm has the East End even tangentially in its sights. And always bear in mind that it’s not a question of if another major storm will hit Long Island, only when. 

Dunes at dusk. —A. Botsford Photo

We can be thankful for, and humbled by, the courage and community spirit of the members of the Quogue Volunteer Fire Department and all first responders, ready to make whatever sacrifices are called for to ensure the safety and protect the property of all residents.

And we can be grateful for the certainty that once we get past the remaining restrictions and prudent caution required by the lingering and resurgent threat of Covid, the fire department—which thankfully brought back the Open House this year and has continued to give fire safety lessons to Quogue School students—will resume all the activities and programs that help give our village its identity: a full fledged Halloween Ghost Parade, support services for Santa’s visit to the Village Green, the Easter Egg hunt, and the traditional pancake breakfast at the firehouse on Thanksgiving weekend, which will be sorely missed again this year.  

Here, and next door at the Fire Department, and next door in the Quogue Village Hall. —A. Botsford Photo

Likewise we can be thankful that we are blessed with the talented teams of people who work for the Village of Quogue and serve in village government, in the Village Office and Building Department, on the police force, and out on the roads and bays: their dedication to helping us all keep safe through the pandemic and their community spirit translate into the best possible quality of life for all of us.

We can be grateful that our beautiful Community Hall has been, and will continue to be, a center for the performing arts on eastern Long Island. Home to the Quogue Junior Theater Troupe and the Hampton Theatre Company as well as the Quogue Chamber Music series and special Westhampton Garden Club programs, the Community Hall is a thriving cultural hub only because of the support of the fine folks in Village Hall, donors, subscribers and volunteers, and the creative people dedicated to making theater and presentations of the highest quality to honor this support. 

Nice day for a dip. —A. Botsford Photo

We can give thanks that the Quogue School has been certified as one of the best schools on the East End—and in all of New York State—courtesy of the caring and committed teachers, administrators, support staff and the Parent Teacher Association all working together to create a truly superlative and nurturing educational experience, all while meeting or exceeding the highest standards of elementary school education.

In cataloguing our gratitude, it bears mentioning that a comparison of local school district taxes shows that a recent comparison shows the Quogue School District with the lowest rate at $1.88 per $1,000 of assessed value. For perspective, consider that the Westhampton Beach district was the next lowest at $5.95 per $1,000.

Our village is blessed, too, with the fantastic Quogue Library, now establishing healthy roots after returning to its beautifully renovated, restored and expanded headquarters on Quogue Street. 

Give credit for the completion of the project and the vast array of in-person and virtual programs there to an enthusiastic and thoroughly engaged board of directors and an accomplished and helpful staff. The overwhelming support and vote of confidence that the library received for the project was clearly offered in recognition of the vital role the library has in binding our community together, across generations, different viewpoints and disciplines.

Another jewel of our village is the Quogue Historical Society, managing and curating the artifacts and accounts of Quogue’s storied history dating back to the 17th century for the benefit of young and old, today and for generations to come. At Quaquanantuck is particularly grateful to the Society, the always helpful board member Pi Gardiner, and Curator Julie Greene for frequently sharing fascinating tidbits of village history that immeasurably improve the texture of this column’s postings.   

January at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. —Marilyn Di Carlo Photo

On the northern border of our village sits another reason to be thankful: the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, where—thanks to the Southampton Town Wildfowl Association, the village, the town, and thousands of supporters since 1934—all are welcome to wander and experience and learn about the unspoiled natural beauty of this area, the flora and fauna and hundreds of direct links to the spirit of Quogue’s past. 

Although the Westhampton Garden Club doesn’t have our village name in its title, Quogue is clearly ever-present in the hearts and minds of its members. The WGC established and maintains all the public gardens in Quogue, including the flowers and greenery at the Village Green; the historic garden and the pollinator garden at the Quogue Library; and the Butterfly Garden at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, calling attention to “The Pollinators” and threats to the monarch butterfly and bee populations, among others. The WGC has also brought renowned speakers to the village, offering engaging and compelling programs that have packed the Community Hall. 

November surf sunset, with gulls. —A. Botsford Photo

Need more? How about the Quogue Association? Nothing inspires gratitude like the efforts of a group of people who get together to inform, educate, do good works, and throw great parties based on a shared love for the place where they live. It is incumbent upon all of us who care about our village—and is there anyone who doesn’t?—to join or donate to the Quogue Association, or if you are already a member, to renew your membership right away, at quogueassociation.org.

The beautiful, tree-lined “business district” of our village, on Jessup Avenue and out to Montauk Highway, has never been more vibrant, with a wondrous makeover of the Quogue Country Market, which is now open year-round, and shops like Double Rainbow, Homespun, the Little Q Quogue Shop, Quogue Liquors, Blown Away Dry Bar and Salon, Flowers by Rori and Jen Going Interiors offering a range of goods and services to delight all ages and tastes. 

The beautiful private Quogue Gallery is another jewel in the necklace of our business district. Appropriate for a celebration of our community at this time of year, an opening reception for the “Quogue in Common” group exhibition is scheduled this weekend, on Saturday, November 27, from 5 to 7 p.m. Masks required. 

The Quogue Village Dock, aka Sunset Central. —A. Botsford Photo

Continue with the checklist: The Post Office, the Board of Election volunteers, the Village Dock and boat launching ramps, the expanded Village Beach facility and the drawbridge that provides access to it, the Quogue Cemetery Association: all of these places and institutions and the people who work for them and who make them work so well: all of  these contribute essential and cultural services, texture and color to make Quogue truly beautiful, and unique. 

Another day, another beautiful sunset captured from the end of Quogo Neck. —Elizabeth Caputo

At Quaquanantuck is aware that these are the most obvious elements of life in our village that prompt our gratitude. Photos and news items regularly sent in to this column by readers over the course of the year offer a more nuanced picture. It is hoped that readers will continue this practice; please send news and social items, comments and observations, and photos (in Large size if taken on a smartphone) to AtQuaq@gmail.com

Glassy Penniman. —Ginny Rosenblatt Photo

On a personal note, At Quaquanantuck is sincerely grateful to all the people who have shown their appreciation for this column by sending in payments for voluntary one-year “subscriptions,” so that the column, now posted monthly (-ish, sort of), can continue to be accessed for free by all who care to read it. 

Quogue Canal sunset. —Geoff Judge Photo

Seeing the health crisis and economic havoc wrought by the pandemic in our nation and around the world; seeing so much conflict around the globe and so many forced to flee their homes and struggle, amid horrific circumstances, to make a new start; observing the meteorological anomalies, natural disasters, and other mounting threats stemming from global warming; and ticking off so many other challenges facing so much of our planet today: may none of us ever take for granted the security of having comfortable shelter, and may we all be ever mindful of all the natural beauty and all of the many blessings we share in this village as we celebrate this holiday of gratitude. Happy Thanksgiving!

High Street Lowdown

Everyone—well, lots of residents and visitors anyway, and a fair number of recent theatergoers from elsewhere—wants to know what’s going on with Jessup Avenue: What’s the rationale? What’s with all the dry wells? Why now? Will the whole street be repaved, all the way up to Otis Ford? When will the work be done? 

Let’s go to the last question and the good news first. The sidewalk in front of the stores has been rebuilt, replacing uneven, cracked and crumbling concrete and correcting the tilt away from the storefronts to bring the walkway into compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. Another ADA compliant improvement is the addition of a half step in front of each store entrance. 

Autumn surfcaster’s sunset. —A. Botsford Photo

Now that the sidewalk is done, the east side of Jessup was being prepared on Wednesday for the first course of asphalt paving. The original target date set by low-bidding South Fork Asphalt (SFA) for completion of this first layer on the east side was November 24, and—pending weather and proper drainage in a couple of wet areas—it looks like this phase of the project will be coming in right on time, or very close to it. 

Anyone who has watched the days, weeks and months tick off the calendar while waiting for completion of any type of renovation project on their home cannot fail to be impressed by the way SFA seems poised to meet its self-imposed mark. 

While it’s still unclear at this stage when the section of Jessup in front of the firehouse will be getting its initial paving, the good news is that the sidewalks are in good shape and the street in front of the stores should be open to two-way traffic and parking for most, if not all, of the busy season between Thanksgiving and the December holidays.

Now to the other questions: 

What’s the rationale? Jessup is one of two roads in the village (the other is Scrub Oak) that still has concrete paving dating back to about the 1930s. Not only was the section in front of the stores in need of a major overhaul for many years, but a better drainage system (the new chain of linked dry wells) was needed to prevent stormwater flowing directly into the bay, and the ancient curb and problematic square gutter system was responsible for tripping up and in many cases injuring numerous pedestrians.   

The idea of an overhaul was broached by the Village Board a few years back, but that plan called for widening the street, which would have required getting rid of the trees on Jessup. That idea, perhaps understandably, met with passionate resistance from a legion of Joyce Kilmer fans in the village. So the Trustees shelved that plan and opted to concentrate instead on fixing up the Village Green. 

Of course, the condition of the street continued to deteriorate and so the overhaul plan resurfaced, if you will, this year. 

Hydrant family out for a stroll. —Lynn Lomas Photo

Why now? In his May 24 email to village residents, Mayor Peter Sartorius announced that the board would be seeking bids for reconstruction of Jessup Avenue and some of the sidewalks between Quogue Street and the Police Station, with work to be done in the fall. In his September 7 email, the mayor alerted residents that—as indicated by signs around the village—work would begin on September 13 and “should be completed before Thanksgiving,” noting that “a final coat of asphalt will be added in the spring.” 

This week, the mayor told At Quaquanantuck that the timing of the project was tied to a couple of factors, namely the seasonal nature of working with asphalt—i.e. not in the winter—and the dates of the “high season” hereabouts, when there is the most activity. Getting at least the initial repaving done between Labor Day and Thanksgiving was the better option, the mayor pointed out, because the earliest the work could be done in the spring would be in April, which would result in the street being torn up through the Memorial Day weekend and into June.  

More good news: the repaving project will only involve the section currently being worked on; no work is currently planned for the section from the Police Station north to Otis Ford.

At this time of giving thanks, At Quaquanantuck is grateful to the mayor for providing some clarity about the project, and thankful that Jessup, from Quogue Street to Midland, will be open in both directions during the holiday season. This means that everyone will be able to shop local and patronize all the wonderful shops and services that make up the village’s lovely business district. 

Please support our local businesses. They are a large part of what gives Quogue its special character. 

For just one example, consider Double Rainbow. Proprietor Grace Davidson recently checked in with At Quaquanantuck, in the midst of overhaul of the sidewalks and the street in front of her shop. “I do want the community to know I am open for business,” Grace wrote, “fully stocked with new Lego sets, Bruder trucks, jigsaw puzzles and board games, including the very hot Schitt’s Creek Monopoly and The Sopranos Monopoly. I could even take orders from the local community and deliver to their homes if they are unable to come to town.” How nice is that? 

Hydrant family reclining, a la M.C. Escher. —A. Botsford Photo

While we’re on the topic of village services, readers should be aware that the Village Highway Department began picking up leaves on November 1. As in years past, leaves—and only leaves—must be on the shoulder of the street by December 15 in order to be picked up. 

Do not pile leaves around fire hydrants or utility equipment. Do not use plastic bags; they will not be picked up, and will have to be removed from the roadside. No brush, such as twigs and branches, or lawn cuttings will be taken away, and mixing this debris with leaves will result in the leaves not being removed. 

Brush with branches up to 3 inches in diameter may be taken to the Westhampton recycling facility free of charge from through December 31. For more information on this option, go to www.southamptontownny.gov. Also, property owners and landscapers who take leaves (only) from a Quogue property may make arrangements with the Quogue Highway Department to dump them at the highway yard. That can circumvent the problem of having piles of leaves in front of a property blowing back onto the lawn before the village crews come around to pick them up.

Leaving the Leaves: the Go Native Option
Seems like a good time to remind readers of the Go Native option detailed in the last At Quaquanantuck, which you can scroll down to see just below this week’s column. 

The gist would be to consider doing garden and lawn cleanup in the spring instead of the fall, as leaves can be left to decompose or raked into hedges, foundation plantings and garden beds. They can also be added to a compost pile, or mulched with a lawn mower to speed the decomposition process and create nature’s perfect fertilizer. The leaf litter also provides protection for overwintering insects—vital to nourishing the birds and stemming the tide of their frightening population decreases. 

There are myriad benefits to leaving the leaves, not the least of which is negating the need to use any noisy, polluting, and annoying leaf blowers. Time to walk the walk, Quieter Quogue adherents.

Autumn egret. —A. Botsford Photo

Season of Gratitude and Many Delights at Wildlife Refuge
Among the many things to be thankful for, now and throughout the year, is the blessing of being able to live here, on this land that was first home to the Shinnecocks, whose language gave us, among much, the names of areas, streets, bodies of water, and many kinds of marine life.

It is apt that the Quogue Wildlife Refuge is in the forefront of recognizing the incredible debt we owe the Shinnecocks, offering programs and activities throughout the year providing education and insights into Shinnecock Nation culture. 

One such program is coming up over two days this weekend. On Friday, November 19, at 4 p.m. all are invited to come to the Refuge to learn more about, and create, a Traditional Talking Stick. The talking stick is a tool used in many Native American traditions; it is passed from person to person as they speak, and only the person who has the stick may speak.  

Considering the cacophony that can accompany Thanksgiving, perhaps bringing a traditional talking stick to the family gathering could be just the ticket. The fee is $20 per person for this program for adults and kids 8 and older, who must be accompanied by an adult. 

On Saturday, November 20, join Shinnecock Nation tribe members outside at the Wildlife Refuge at 10 a.m. for a Native American Blessing of the Earth, a guided traditional dance, and a Collaborative Art Project

After the blessing and dance, participants can take part in the collaborative art project by writing a message, wish, or note of gratitude on a branch, which will be added to the giant nest installation at the Refuge. Register for these programs by visiting quoguewildliferefuge.org or calling 631-653-4771.  

The Wildlife Refuge gains an eerie beauty during the Light the Night Winter Trail Walks. —Photo courtesy of QWR

Two weeks from now, on Saturday, December 4, it’s time once again for a magical Light the Night Winter Trail Walk and the wonderful Outdoor Holiday Market. Both programs are in-person and outdoors; reservations for the Light the Night walks are available between 5:30 and 7 p.m. The rain date is Sunday, December 5.  

The Light the Night Winter Trail Walk, for adults and families, is a self-guided, peaceful stroll through the gently illuminated forest trails. Participants are asked to remember that this is a quiet walk. The fee is $15 per person, or $10 for kids 12 and under. 

Shopping at the outdoor Holiday Market for meaningful gifts that support QWR and local vendors is free for all. QWR pewter ornaments, hats, sweatshirts, and fun stocking stuffers are just some of the swell Refuge gifts that will be available; plus hand poured soy candles by Seatuck Cove Creations, Gigi’s Jewelry handmade bracelets by the charming and talented Stephanie Wagner, natural soaps by Stepping Stone Soaps, children’s books and more. Tickets for Light the Night Winter Trail Walks can be purchased on the QWR website, quoguewildliferefuge.org; more information at 631-653-4771.

Among the treasures available at the outdoor Holiday Market at the Wildlife Refuge will be QWR sweatshirts with animal tracks on the sleeve, and handmade bracelets from Gigi’s Jewelry. —Photos courtesy of QWR


“Pavarotti” Screening at Library Film Feast on Saturday
As detailed in the last At Quaquanantuck (and repeated here) the next in-person Film Feast at the library is coming up on Saturday, November 20, at 6 p.m. when the featured film will be “Pavarotti,” the 2019 documentary on the legendary Italian tenor directed by Ron Howard. 

Created from a combination of Luciano Pavarotti’s genre-redefining performances and never-before-seen footage, the film provides what critics have called “a stunningly intimate portrait” of one of the most beloved opera singers of all time.

As a reflection of the singer’s rock star status, commentary in the film comes from such diverse voices as Bono, Clive James, José Carreras, Kofi Annan, Luciano Pavarotti himself, Nelson Mandela, Nicoletta Mantovani, Phil Donahue, Pl, Princess Diana, Spike Lee, Stevie Wonder, and Zubin Mehta.

Kenneth Turan of The Los Angeles Times called the documentary “a warm, emotional and completely involving film about the celebrated tenor.” 

Writing for The Wrap, Todd Gilchrist said, “Howard’s film is a love letter to the icon, but ultimately “Pavarotti” is a more of a celebration of the individual behind that façade and a reminder that it’s as much his humanity as his talent that made him a star.”

And The Austin Chronicle’s Steve Davis wrote: “This love letter dedicated to opera’s biggest rock star, the larger-than-life Luciano Pavarotti, achieves something most documentaries about the deceased rarely do: It brings a man back to glorious life.”

The “price” of admission for this international Film Feast will be an Italian potluck dish to serve at least six people and a beverage to share. Masks required. Email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101, to register or for more information.

Exhibitions at Library and Quogue Gallery Celebrate Local Artists
Opening receptions will be the order of the day on the Saturday after Thanksgiving, November 27, celebrating the work of local artists on view at the Quogue Library and the Quogue Gallery.  

East African Crane by Garrett Chingery

At the Quogue Library, East Quogue artist Garrett Chingery will present a selection of new paintings from his portraiture series entitled “The Ark” from November 20 to January 4, 2022. The exhibition will feature images of wild and domestic animals from around the world. 

Zebra by Garrett Chingery

Paintings are affordably priced, according to the artist, making them accessible to collectors as well as “wonderful gifts for the holidays or any special occasion.” All are welcome to the Artist’s Reception on Saturday, November 27, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Masks are required. 

In a statement, Mr. Chingery noted that “The endless variety of size, shape, color and pattern found in the animal kingdom never ceases to amaze me. Plus, the abundance of creatures that inhabit this Earth provides a wonderful opportunity to explore in depth my fascination with portraiture, which is not only a quest to achieve a physical likeness but also a challenge to endow the subject with an emotional intelligence and a life of its own.”

All of the works in the exhibition are original acrylic paintings made on 11- by 14-inch canvas panels. All are individually hand painted by the artist, and are “in no way any form of printed reproduction.”

“Initially, I’m painting three very similar versions of the same animal,” Mr. Chingery wrote, “to give several buyers the opportunity to own their favorite one. Based on demand, I may alter the number of images I create of the same subject.” 

Mixed media on canvas works by Anne-Céline Grandury will be on view in the “Quogue in Common” exhibition opening on November 24 at the Quogue Gallery and running through December 31. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

On November 24, the Quogue Gallery will open its traditional Thanksgiving show of local artists, “Quogue in Common.” The opening reception will be held on Saturday, November 27, from 5 to 7 p.m. Masks are required. 

Artists featured this year are: Maggie Cardelús (oil and charcoal on photography, crude oil and ink (yellow) on rice paper, and jewelry), Margot Carr (metal print), Susan Cushing (painting), Anne-Céline Grandury (mixed media on canvas), Robin Koffler (painting), George Motz (photography) and Patricia Udell (sculpture).

“Quogue in Common” will remain on view at the Quogue Gallery through December 31.

Metal print works by Margot Carr, left, and paintings by Susan Cushing, right, will be on view in “Quogue in Common.”


Quogue Library in Step with the Season
True to form, from now through December 12, the Quogue Library is collecting items in support of two worthy organizations and causes. 

The first is Maureen’s Haven, an organization that assists in providing homeless men and women with supportive services, access to case management and programs, and a safe place to stay during the winter months. (Items sought include: toiletries, underwear, socks, winter clothes, gloves, scarves, sweaters, blankets, reusable bags.)

The second is the Family Service League’s Project Toy, an effort that brings joy to more than 3,000 children who live in Suffolk County, ages newborn to 18, through the donation of new, unwrapped gifts. (Items sought include: board games, stuffed animals, puzzles, building blocks, art supplies, notebooks, paints, coloring books, crayons, bikes, baby toys, video games.) 

Here’s an idea: While readers can readily find most of the items being sought at stores and shops in nearby villages and hamlets, there is one shop right here in our village that can supply almost all of the gifts needed to make the library’s collection for Project Toy a success.

At Quaquanantuck encourages every reader of this column to stop in at Double Rainbow between now and December 12 and pick up at least one toy to donate to the current library drive. Here’s a chance for a classic win-win: we can support a local business while bringing some happiness to children who typically operate at a deficit in that department. It’s also a great way to get your motor started in the holiday spirit department.

Also true to form, lots of great in-person and virtual programs on the schedule at the library. Some highlights include:in-person pilates classes on Mondays and virtual cardio classes via Zoom on Tuesdays in November and December with Leisa Taylor. All classes are at 10 a.m. and the fee is $10 per class. 

Upcoming virtual programs include: a virtual “Winter Wonderland” adult Paint Party with Marie Camenares on Friday, November 19 at 7 p.m., $10 fee, pick up supplies in a kit at the library; Chef Rob Recipes available through November at www.quoguelibrary.org/chef-rob-november-recipes, with hard copies available at the library front desk; an Edible Holistic Wellness virtual workshop led by Alicia Randolph-Lucchesi on Tuesday, November 30, at 7 p.m.; and a virtual discussion of the holiday classic film, “It’s a Wonderful Life” led by Brian Rose on Sunday, December 5, at 3 p.m.

The inimitable Rori from Flowers by Rori will be on hand for an in-person Holiday Trees decorating workshop on Saturday, December 11, at 3 p.m. The $30 fee for the workshop includes all supplies needed. Another of the popular Family Movie Nights will be offered on Saturday, December 4, at 4 p.m. All are invited to bring a blanket, pick a spot, and “camp out” at the library to enjoy a classic family film, “Night at the Museum.”    

Quogue Library staffers Arie “Morticia” and Ian “The Grimefighter” get into the spirit of Halloween.—Elizabeth Caputo Photo

“Write America” Now Crowdcasting from New Home
Now headquartered at Byrd’s Books in Bethel, Connecticut, “Write America”—the virtual reading and discussion series founded by Roger Rosenblatt, late of this village—continues to Crowdcast programs aimed at bridging some of the widening divisions currently eroding the foundations of our republic. 

Upcoming programs on the regular schedule of Monday evenings at 7 p.m. include Russell Banks and Ishmael Angaluuk Hope on November 22; Amy Hempel, Jim Shepard and W. Todd Kaneko on November 29; Jennifer Chang, David Lynn and Edward Zwick on December 6; and Juan Felipe Herrera and David Tomas Martinez on December 13. 

Special programs coming up include Roger Rosenblatt in conversation with Academy Award-winning lyricist Alan Bergman on Wednesday, December 1, at 7 p.m.; and Richard Ford and Bruce Weber honoring the late E.L. Doctorow.on Tuesday, December 14, also at 7 p.m. 

More information and registration information is available at byrdsbooks.com/write-america-reading-our-country

At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.comNews Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Whither Autumn?

Autumn? What autumn? Going solely by the generally sublime weather that has graced our village recently, one would never know that the season was supposed to have changed on September 22. 

Air and water temperatures have encouraged ocean bathing and lunches and cocktails at the beach right up to last weekend. Although rising later and setting earlier, the sun has shone warmly on all manner of outdoor recreation. 

How quickly the ocean changes its demeanor, from the embodiment of serenity on October 24 …

Even this week’s nor’easter (At Quaquanantuck has no truck with such meteorologically alarmist terms as “bomb cyclone) with its drenching rain and thunder and lightning felt more like a late summer brush with a hurricane passing way out to sea than a legitimate autumn storm foretelling that winter is just around the corner.  

… to the unruly uproar of October 27. Erosion courtesy of the Tuesday-into-Wednesday nor’easter. —A.Botsford Photos

But the calendar tells another story, and so we know from the date and all the signifiers at every turn that we are a solid month into the fall. And with Halloween coming up on Sunday, we are already perched on the cusp of the year’s fourth quarter, with a string of holidays to get through before we hit the finish line … and start over. 

And, in case there are any still in denial that winter is on the way, the clocks will be set back one hour a week from Sunday on November 7, and then there’ll be no way around it. Sigh. 

Season of the gourd. —Lynn Lomas Photo

Halloween Takes Center Stage
After two years of the pandemic putting the kibosh on trick or treating—not to mention taking a lot of the fun out of wearing masks—Halloween is staging a major comeback this year, with all manner of observances and activities planned. 

For starters, even though Jessup Avenue is still torn up and inhospitable, the Quogue Fire Department is getting back in the swing of the Ghost Parade business, teaming up with the Quogue School for a kids’ costumed march on Friday, October 29, at 1:30 p.m

The ghouls and goblins, comic book heroes and villains, princesses and witches (is anybody a hobo anymore?) will gather in front of the school on Edgewood at 1:30 p.m. and will follow a fire truck east to Old Depot, south to Midland, north on Lamb Avenue, and east again on Edgewood to wind up back at the school. 

QFD volunteers will then provide “treats and eats” for the kids at the school. There has been some talk that the school might declare a preemptive rain date of today, Thursday, so At Quaquanantuck advises checking with the school, 631-653-4285, as early as possible for confirmation.

A few of the characters who bring the Enchanted Forest Trail to life at the Wildlife Refuge. —QWR Photo

Over at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, this Saturday, October 30, from noon to 2 p.m. will be the third and final opportunity for kids age 2 to 7 accompanied by an adult to enjoy the Enchanted Forest Trail

Participants follow a QWR guide to meet whimsical, fun, and educational characters on the forest trails. Kids and adults are invited to “dress up if you like!” Activities and games will be available.

Clockwise from left: Caitlin and Quinn Cameron with QWR intern Alexa Lightbourne; QWR Executive Director Mike Nelson at the wheel for a haywagon ride; and Cara Fernandes, QWR Program Coordinator and part-time mermaid. —QWR Photos

The fee is $10 per person and reservations are required; call 631-653-4771 to reserve an arrival time. All participants are invited to bring their own reusable mug and/or water bottle for a free sticker. 

The Quogue Library, meanwhile, all decked out in scarecrow finery, has scheduled an array of programs this weekend with Halloween themes. 

The fun begins with a live via Zoom “Let’s Draw Monsters” workshop on Saturday, October 30, at 2 p.m. for young artists in grades three through seven. Award-winning cartoonist Rick Stromoski will teach participants to draw a variety of furry, hoofed, and spooky friends in this interactive art program. 

To register, click here or visit the Quogue Library website, www.quoguelibrary.org, and click on the Let’s Draw Monsters flier on the home page. 

A few of the scarecrows adding atmosphere at the Quogue Library. —Elizabeth Caputo Photos

There’s more Halloween fun in store in a “Not So Spooky Night at the Library” in-person program on Saturday, October 30, from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. for kids age 5 and up. Chief storyteller Miss Amanda will present a special Not-So-Spooky Storytime that will turn into a sleepover for participants’ stuffed animal friends. The kids can return the next day, on Sunday, October 31, to pick up their stuffed animals and hear all about the fun adventures they had. 

Wrapping up the library’s Halloween festivities will be a “Trick or Treat and Costume Parade” on Sunday, October 31, at 2 p.m. Meanwhile, all ghouls and ghosts and other costumed revelers are invited to the Quogue library to trick or treat all day. 

For the 2 p.m. parade, everyone is encouraged to get their “best boos, roars, and ‘trick or treats’” ready in preparation for a costume parade around the grounds. How exciting to be allowed to be loud at the library!

For more information or to register for these programs, call 631-653-4224, ext. 101. 

Hampton Theatre Company Presents “Native Gardens”
With Jessup Avenue all torn up, the trick is parking and then getting into the Quogue Community Hall through the courtroom entrance on the north side of the building. The treat, of course, according to those who have seen the play, is the Hampton Theatre Company production of“Native Gardens” by Karen Zacarías, the first play of the HTC’s 2021-2022 season, now in the second week of a three-week run. 

Terrance Fiore, Martha Kelly, and Samantha Herrera, and Edwin A. Cruz, left to right, in a scene from “Native Gardens.” —Tom Kochie Photo

“Native Gardens” brings home the often hysterical truth of the old saw that “you can’t choose your neighbors,” with cultures and gardens in conflict, turning two well-intentioned couples into feuding enemies.

Rising attorney Pablo and doctoral candidate Tania, his very pregnant wife, have just purchased a home next to Frank and Virginia, a well-established D.C. couple with a prize-worthy English garden. But an impending barbecue for Pablo’s colleagues and what begins as a delicate disagreement over a long-standing fence line soon spiral into an all-out border dispute, exposing both couples’ notions of race, taste, class and privilege.

The play was hailed by Broadway World as “a lighthearted comedy with some heavier threads woven through for just the right amount of heft.” The Chicago Tribune called it “a comedy planted in difficult, painful issues.” 

The cast of the HTC production of “Native Gardens” features three HTC veterans: Terrance Fiore as Frank; Martha Kelly as Virginia, and Samantha Herrera as Tania. Edwin A. Cruz, a newcomer to the HTC stage, has the role of Pablo Del Valle. 

George Loizides (“Private Lives,” “Don’t Dress for Dinner,” “Lost in Yonkers”) directs. Set design is by Gary Hygom; lighting design by Sebastian Paczynski; sound by Seamus Naughton; and costumes by Teresa Lebrun. 

“Native Gardens” runs at the Quogue Community Hall through November 7, with shows on Thursdays and Fridays at 7, Saturdays at 8 and Sundays at 2:30. An additional matinee performance will be offered during the final weekend of the production, on Saturday, November 6, prior to the regular 8 p.m. performance that evening. A talkback with the cast will be offered following the Friday, October 29, 7 p.m. performance. 

For the safety of all, ticket holders are required to show a photo ID and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid-19 test within 72 hours of the day of the performance they are attending. Face-covering masks will be required at all times while inside the theater. For more information on safety protocols, visit hamptontheatre.org

Tickets are $36, $31 for seniors, $25 for students under 25, with no additional fees this year. For reservations and information on all packages and available discounts, visit www.hamptontheatre.org or email info@hamptontheatre.org.

To reserve tickets, visit www.hamptontheatre.org, or call the Hampton Theatre Company box office at 1-631-653-8955.

This yellow rumped warbler stopped at Triton Lane in East Quogue on its way south. —Florrie Morrisey Photo

Go Native Endorses Leaving the Leaves
At Quaquanantuck received an autumn message from our Quogue Go Native correspondents this week, with some tips for homeowners now that the growing season has passed: 

“Please consider doing your garden/lawn cleanup in the spring instead of the fall!

“Leaves can be left to decompose or raked into hedges, foundation plantings and garden beds. Or add them to your compost pile. They can also be mulched with a lawn mower, which will speed the decomposition process. This is nature’s perfect fertilizer! The leaf litter also provides protection for overwintering insects—vital to nourishing the birds and stemming the tide of their frightening population decreases. 

“Additionally, don’t cut back the seed heads on dried flowering plants as they provide a feast for both winter residents and migratory birds. Wait until the spring! 

“And, very importantly, following these protocols will have the added benefit of avoiding the use of leaf blowers and the pollution* and noise they generate, as well as the damage they do to biodiversity (i.e. the birds and the bees who need the shelter of the leaves).

“*In addition to the chemical emissions that leaf blower engines produce, the dust they stir up contains pollen, mold, animal feces, heavy metals and chemicals from herbicides and pesticides. 

“It’s not too late to talk to your landscapers and give them different instructions. Leave the leaves! Your wildlife and your planet will thank you.”

Historical Society Offers Two Cemetery Tours on November 7

As you are now, so once was I

In health & strength tho here I lie

As I am now, so you must be

Prepare for death and follow me.

It might be a week after the holiday, but the inscription above, from the gravestone of Jonathan Cook (1700 – 1754) certainly qualifies in spirit as a Halloween message, as well as a great enticement to take one of two walking tours offered by the Quogue Historical Society, at 1 and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, November 7, at Quogue’s historic burying ground. 

Headstone at the grave of Jonathan Cook, one of Quogue’s earliest settlers.—Photo courtesy of Quogue Historical Society.

Typical of mid-18th-century carving and design, the Jonathan Cook headstone—the oldest in the Quogue Cemetery—was created by noted New York City stone carver William Grant, and signed at the bottom. It is regarded as the best example of Grant’s work on Long Island.

This headstone is just one stop on the tours, which will be led by Quogue Historical Society Curator and Southampton Town Historian Julie Greene.

The oldest section of the Quogue Cemetery was first laid out in the mid-1700s, as the grandsons of Southampton’s original settlers, the Post, Foster, Jessup, Herrick, Howell, and Cook families, began building homes along what we now know as Quogue Street. 

As a release from the QHS tells us, “the gravestones in the burying ground are valuable historical resources, providing unique records of the community; and, in many cases, they may be the only records of an individual that survive. Headstones supply not only birth and death dates, but their style, inscriptions, and symbols offer clues to class, customs, and religion. 

“Each tablet and monument, made of sandstone, slate, marble, or granite, tells a unique story of one of Quogue’s early residents and offers insight into the village’s history and development. Because of its connection to the early history of Quogue Village, the Quogue Cemetery, owned by the Quogue Cemetery Association, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

The tours, beginning at the Quogue Cemetery at 1 and 2:30 on November 7, are limited to 20. Reservations are required. For information and to register, call 631-996-2404, or email info@quoguehistory.org.


Exhibition Continues at Quogue Library; Busy Fall Schedule
Three Artists – Three Visions: Elizabeth Nehls, Linda Nemeth & Laura Stroh” will remain on view in the Quogue Library Art Gallery through November 16. 

Detail of “Blue Hills” by Linda Nemeth, left, and “Cedar Point” by Laura Stroh are on view at the Quogue Library Art Gallery.

According to the library release on the exhibition, Elizabeth Nehls “captures fleeting moments” in her graphite drawings of children; Linda Nemeth’s mixed-media watercolors “undulate and float on their surface” and Laura Stroh “wrestles with medium, color, and space in her energized abstracts and landscapes.”

Among the many stimulating programs coming up at the Quogue Library, a few highlights include: the in-person “Networking in a Post-Covid Pre-Holiday World” on Saturday, November 6, at 1 p.m., led by Beverly R Daniel, MS, MBA, founder of the CareerGrowth Group; a virtual “Who Will Decide? Health Care and Medical Decisions in our Changing World” program on Tuesday, November 9, at 1 p.m.; the Adult Book Club discussion of “The Paris Library” by Janet Skeslien Charles on Sunday, November 14,  at noon; and a virtual adult paint party with Marie Camenares: “Watercoloring ‘Winter Wonderland’” on Friday, November 19,  at 7 p.m., fee $10. 

And no one will want to miss the inimitable Rori from Flowers by Rori leading a “Thanksgiving Floral Arrangement” in-person program on Saturday, November 20, at 3 p.m.  All supplies will be provided for the creation of a beautiful large floral arrangement. Fee is $25. 

For more information or to register for these programs, call 631-653-4224, ext. 101; or visit www.quoguelibrary.org

As always, the Quogue Library continues to offer a wide array of programming for children, teens/tweens, families, and adults of all ages. Getting more information and registering is easy: visit www.quoguelibrary.org and simply click on the flier for any program that catches your interest and a registration link or instructions on how to register will pop up. 

Wildlife Refuge Going Batty Again
The Quogue Wildlife Refuge is inviting one and all to “Celebrate Bat Week!” today, Thursday, October 28, at a kids’ program at 4 p.m. and an adult lecture at 5:30 p.m. 

The 45-minute presentations are all about bat anatomy, various lifestyles of bats from all over the world, including Long Island, their ecological importance to the planet, and ways to help local bats. For the 4 p.m. kids’ program, children must be accompanied by an adult, and can take home a bat mask to make. 

The fee is $5 per person, and space is limited. All are asked to note that these are indoor programs taking place in the Nature Center and masks are required. To register, call 631-653-4771. 

Saturday, November 13, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. is the pickup day and time at the QWR for all who ordered bird seed as part of the annual fall bird seed sale fundraiser for the Wildlife Refuge and the Eastern Long Island Audubon Society, courtesy of Eastport Feed. 

Next  month’s Full Moon Night Hike at the Refuge steps off at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, November 17. Adults and families with children age 11 and up can enjoy an evening hike through the forest up to North Pond while looking and listening for nocturnal creatures, and enjoying some night vision activities under the light of the moon.  Cost is $10 for QWR members or $20 for non-members; reservations required at least 24 hours prior, as space is limited.  

For more information on any of these programs, visit quoguewildliferefuge.org or call 631-653-4771. 

November Film Feast to Screen “Pavarotti” at Library
The next in-person Film Feast at the library is coming up on Saturday, November 20, at 6 p.m. when the featured film will be “Pavarotti,” the 2019 documentary on the legendary Italian tenor  directed by Ron Howard. 

Created from a combination of Luciano Pavarotti’s genre-redefining performances and never-before-seen footage, the film provides what critics have called “a stunningly intimate portrait” of one of the most beloved opera singers of all time.

Luciano Pavarotti

As a reflection of the singer’s rock star status, commentary in the film comes from such diverse voices as Bono, Clive James, José Carreras, Kofi Annan, Luciano Pavarotti, Nelson Mandela, Nicoletta Mantovani, Phil Donahue, Pl, Princess Diana, Spike Lee, Stevie Wonder, and Zubin Mehta.

Kenneth Turan of The Los Angeles Times called the documentary “a warm, emotional and completely involving film about the celebrated tenor.” 

Writing for The Wrap, Todd Gilchrist said, “Howard’s film is a love letter to the icon, but ultimately “Pavarotti” is a more of a celebration of the individual behind that façade and a reminder that it’s as much his humanity as his talent that made him a star.”

And The Austin Chronicle’s Steve Davis wrote: “This love letter dedicated to opera’s biggest rock star, the larger-than-life Luciano Pavarotti, achieves something most documentaries about the deceased rarely do: It brings a man back to glorious life.”

The “price” of admission for this international Film Feast will be an Italian potluck dish to serve at least six people and a beverage to share. Masks required. Email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101, to register or for more information.

FPA Looks at “The Future of Persian Gulf Security”
The next installment of this year’s Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program, offered live at the Quogue Library and via Zoom on Saturday, November 13, at 5 p.m., will focus on “The Future of Persian Gulf Security.” 

According to briefing materials from the FPA, the Persian Gulf remains tense as the rivalry between the regional powers of Saudi Arabia and Iran continues. Tensions in the region escalated in early 2020 as the United States began to intervene in the Gulf, launching an airstrike that killed two Iranian military commanders. 

Questions to be addressed on November 13 include: What are the historical influences that have led to these tensions? What role, if any, should the United States play? Is using military force a viable foreign policy option now and into the future? 

Prospective participants are reminded that the Great Decisions program is not a lecture followed by a Q&A, but a live audience discussion moderated by David Rowe after a 25-minute documentary on the particular topic being considered. 

To sign up for the November 13 program via Zoom, visit www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the FPA Great Decisions “Global Supply Chains” flier on the home page. For more information or to sign up for the live program, email info@quoguelibrary.org.  

According to the Quogue Association’s Stefanie Beck, “Bob Murray was the first to buy and fly the new Quogue flag being offered on the Quogue Association website (quogueassociation.org) for $50.  The flag is 3’x5’ and is evocative of the sun and surf that makes Quogue a wonderful beach community.” —Robert Murray Photo

“Write America” Now Crowdcasting from New Home
After the very sad demise of its former host, the independent Book Revue bookstore in Huntington, “Write America”—the virtual reading and discussion series founded by Roger Rosenblatt, late of this village—has found a new home at another big hearted independent bookstore, Byrd’s Books, located in Bethel, Connecticut. 

More on this series aimed at bridging some of the widening divisions currently eroding the foundations of our republic in the November At Quaquanantuck. For now, readers will want to know that on Monday, November 1, at 7 p.m. Byrd’s Books will present episode 34 in the Write America series, featuring the writers Carl Phillips, Kai Coggin and Lloyd Schwartz. Register and obtain log in at www.crowdcast.io/e/write-america-carl/register.

On November 8 at 7 p.m., the featured authors will be Major Jackson, Lee Herrick and Frank Bidart. Books are for sale each week and purchases help support the program. So great to see this series weather the transition. Thank you, Byrd’s Books. 

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.comNews Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

It All Adds Up

As all year ’round and part-time residents—and most seasonal visitors—know, there is a mystical quality to the appeal of our beautiful village that in many ways exceeds the capacity of words to describe. 

What you might not know is that there are in fact heretofore unremarked mathematical underpinnings that, although they may not explain the magic of this special place, demonstrate yet again that when it comes to Quogue, “there are more things in heaven and earth … than are dreamt of in your philosophy.” 

The swimming is still good as surfcasting season begins in earnest. —A. Botsford Photo

Consider the recent email forwarded to At Quaquanantuck by thoughtful former colleagues of mine at The Southampton Press (edited for clarity; mathematical (?) punctuation the authors’): 

“Dear Southampton news,
“We are a group of mathematicians in Amherst, Massachusetts, and we thought we’d let you know that the ZIP code of Quogue, NY: 11959 came up in our calculations. 

“11959. is a prime number. and it is related to the prime number. 72467 in the following way: The sum of the cubes of the digits of the number. 72467 is 974; for example  7^3+2^3+4^3+6^3+7^3 = 974. And  974. multiplied by the integer 146761 plus 72467 is equal to the Quogue ZIP Code 11959.  squared, or 143017681. So, the whole expression looks like: 72467+146761(974)=11959^2. 

“We thought this was something you needed to know.”
Best regards
W. Gosnell
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 

While At Quaquanantuck is not convinced that this is something we all needed to know, nonetheless it is yet another mystery of our village identity that could give one something to ponder, should one come up short of other things to think about in one’s idle hours.

And, considering the major problems confronting the human race today, it’s good to know that there are mathematicians at august institutions of higher learning who believe that attempting to unravel the mysteries of the Village of Quogue ZIP code is the best use of their time and intellectual resources.

Next up: fractals in wave theory?  

And on we go. 


The monumental enterprise of repaving Jessup Avenue continues. —A. Botsford Photo

Police Officer Barbara Tiedemann Closes Out an Exemplary Career
After an illustrious career with the Quogue Village Police, stalwart Police Officer Barbara Tiedemann worked her final tour of duty on Thursday, September 30, and walked out of police headquarters on Jessup Avenue for the last time at 3 p.m. that day to be greeted by a large turnout of village residents, friends and family. 

Lieutenant Daniel Hartman, left, and Quogue Village Police Chief Chris Isola, right, flanking Police Officer Barbara Tiedemann at her final “walkout” on September 30.

Reporting on the event, one of the organizers, Lieutenant Daniel Hartman, noted that the size of the turnout was just one indicator of how much PO Tiedemann had “touched the lives of many amongst the Quogue Community, as well as our neighboring Police and Fire Departments.”

Lieutenant Hartman went on to say that “she has now retired, but is turning a new page on life, which will allow her to dedicate more time to her family and loved ones.” 

Quogue Village Police Chief Chris Isola had this to say about PO Tiedemann’s retirement: “The compassion and concern for the community she served will be greatly missed; however, she has left a lasting impression upon her co-workers, who carry on her love of the community she served.” 

Congratulations, Officer Tiedemann, and thank you for your service! 

Look for more on Officer Barbara in the next At Quaquanantuck.

Members of the Quogue Village Police Department rally round Police Officer Barbara Tiedemann, sixth from right, at her final “walkout.”

Quogue Jazz Trio Ready to Make Oktoberfest Mellow
A couple more public gigs coming up to delight the fans of The QJ3 – Quogue Jazz Trio

Drummer Mark Stevens, guitarist Danny Richman, and bassist Roger Moley will be on Main Street in Westhampton Beach near the Beach Bakery on Sunday, October 10, for this year’s Oktoberfest sponsored by the Greater Westhampton Chamber of Commerce. 

The band will be serving up their signature mellow jazz stylings from 11 a.m. to noon and then, after a short break to allow for a magician to perform amazing feats of prestidigitation, they’ll come back to the stage to play from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

Along with live music, the 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. festival will offer a beer garden (of course), food trucks and fine fare from local restaurants, a car show, kids’ games, and the traditional “much more.” 

On Saturday, October 16, the band will be back in the gazebo at the Farmer’s Market on the Village Green in Westhampton Beach from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Here’s another chance to shop for fresh produce, farm fresh eggs and all manner of other goodies while listening to the certified fresh sounds of the QJ3. 

The QJ3 – Quogue Jazz Trio—Danny Richman on guitar, Mark Stevens on drums, and Roger Moley on standup bass—will be performing between 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, October 10, at the Westhampton Oktoberfest.

Quogue Library Continues the Scarecrow Tradition
The third annual Scarecrow Decorating Event for families is now underway at the Quogue Library, with scarecrow frames to decorate ready for pickup. 

Participants can decorate the frames and return them to the library by Friday, October 16, and the library will display all the scarecrows around the pond on Jessup, in the village, and around the library for the last weeks of October. 

All those who would like to keep their decorated frames are asked to inform the library by the end of October. For more information, call the library at 631-653-4224, ext. 101. 

Graphite drawing by Elizabeth Nehls

The Gallery at Quogue Library is presenting a new exhibition, “Three Artists – Three Visions: Elizabeth Nehls, Linda Nemeth & Laura Stroh,” on view through November 16. All are welcome to attend an Artists’ Reception on Saturday, October 9, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. 

According to the library release on the exhibition, Elizabeth Nehls “captures fleeting moments” in her graphite drawings of children; Linda Nemeth’s mixed-media watercolors “undulate and float on their surface” and Laura Stroh “wrestles with medium, color, and space in her energized abstracts and landscapes.” 

Speaking of art, there’s another Virtual Adult Paint Party with Marie Camenares coming up on  Friday, October 22,  at 7 p.m. All needed supplies are provided in a kit to be picked up from the library starting October 14.  The fee is $10, due upon registration.

The next in-person Film Feast at the library is coming up on Saturday, October 23, at 6:15 p.m. when the featured film will be “Charade,” the 1963 romantic thriller starring Audrey Hepburn and Cary Grant and directed by Stanley Donen. 

Summing up a rave review, a critic writing for The San Francisco Chronicle wrote: “Few thrillers create as much sheer joy and happiness as ‘Charade,’ in which Cary Grant spoofs his Alfred Hitchcock persona, Audrey Hepburn exudes her usual magnetic charm, and Paris is as scenic as ever.”

The “price” of admission is a potluck dish to serve at least six people and all are asked to bring their own beverage. Halloween costumes optional; masks required. Email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101, to register or for more information.

As always, the Quogue Library continues to offer a wide array of programming for children, teens/tweens, families, and adults of all ages. Getting more information and registering is easy: visit www.quoguelibrary.org and simply click on the flier for any program that catches your interest and a registration link or instructions on how to register will pop up. 

Wildlife Refuge Brings Back Enchanted Forest Trail; Bird Seed Sale
The Enchanted Forest Trail for kids age 2 to 7 accompanied by an adult is back at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, with opportunities for strolling on Saturday, October 23; Sunday, October 24; and Saturday, October 30, from noon to 2 p.m. each day. 

Participants will follow their guide to meet whimsical, fun, and educational characters on the forest trails. Kids and adults are invited to “dress up if you like!” Activities and games will be available.

The fee is $10 per person and reservations are required; call 631-653-4771 to reserve an arrival time. All participants are invited to bring their own reusable mug and/or water bottle for a free sticker. 

Rare capture of a kingfisher not on the wing by nature photographer Florrie Morrisey.

Orders are due by Monday, October 11, for the annual Bird Seed Sale fundraiser at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. 

The idea is to start the winter off with plenty of seed and enjoy observing the birds at your feeders. The Bird Seed Sale is a fundraiser for Eastern Long Island Audubon Society and for the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, generously sponsored by Eastport Feeds. 

The Seed Sale pre-order form can be filled out by clicking here, or, for more information visit www.quoguewildliferefuge.org or call 631-653-4771. 

This month’s Full Moon Night Hike at the Refuge steps off at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, October 19. Adults and families with children age 11 and up can enjoy an evening hike through the forest up to North Pond while looking and listening for nocturnal creatures, and enjoying some night vision activities under the light of the moon.  Cost is $10 for QWR members or $20 for non-members; reservations required at least 24 hours prior, as space is limited.  

And don’t forget that Amy Hess is offering Earth Yoga classes in the Nature Center on Wednesdays from 9 to 10 a.m. in October and November. The fee is $15 per class; pre-register and pre-pay online or by calling the Refuge as space is limited. Masks will be required for this indoor program.  For more information on any of these programs, visit quoguewildliferefuge.org or call 631-653-4771.

FPA Looks at “Global Supply Chains and National Security”
The next installment of this year’s Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program, offered live at the Quogue Library and via Zoom on Saturday, September 16, at 5 p.m., will focus on the issue of “Global Supply Chains and National Security.” 

The September 16 discussion will explore some of the possible lasting effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on global supply chains, international trade, and national security. 

FPA resource materials suggest that the shutdown of global supply chains due to the pandemic has revealed some serious issues related to the long developing high level of global economic interdependence. For example, what happens when one country is the main source for an item, such as face masks, and then can no longer supply the item? 

Countries suddenly unable to meet the demand for certain supplies are faced with growing calls for economic nationalism, which in turn could have a significant impact on national security?

With many nations struggling during the early outbreak of Covid-19 to meet the demand for certain medical supplies, should more power be given to international organizations (like the WHO) giving them more control over the supply chains of certain essential equipment and supplies? How could countries, private sector companies, and international organizations work together better  to prevent future pandemics?

Prospective participants are reminded that the Great Decisions program is not a lecture followed by a Q&A, but a live audience discussion moderated by David Rowe after a 25-minute documentary on the particular topic being considered. 

To sign up for the September 16 program via Zoom, visit www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the FPA Great Decisions “Global Supply Chains” flier on the home page. For more information or to sign up for the live program, email info@quoguelibrary.org.  

The 2021 Great Decisions Briefing Book may be purchased ($22) from the Quogue Library or digitally from fpa.org

Hampton Theatre Company Presents “Native Gardens”
“Native Gardens” by Karen Zacarías will be the first play of the Hampton Theatre Company’s 2021-2022 season, opening on October 21 at the Quogue Community Hall and running through November 7. 

“Native Gardens” brings home the often hysterical truth of the old saw that “you can’t choose your neighbors”: cultures and gardens collide, turning two well-intentioned couples into feuding enemies.

Rising attorney Pablo and doctoral candidate Tania, his very pregnant wife, have just purchased a home next to Frank and Virginia, a well-established D.C. couple with a prize-worthy English garden. But an impending barbecue for Pablo’s colleagues and what begins as a delicate disagreement over a long-standing fence line soon spiral into an all-out border dispute, exposing both couples’ notions of race, taste, class and privilege.

The play was hailed by Broadway World as “a lighthearted comedy with some heavier threads woven through for just the right amount of heft.” The Chicago Tribune called it “a comedy planted in difficult, painful issues.” 

The cast of the HTC production of “Native Gardens” features three HTC veterans: Terrance Fiore as Frank; Martha Kelly as Virginia, and Samantha Herrera as Tania. Edwin A. Cruz, a newcomer to the HTC stage, has the role of Pablo Del Valle. 

George Loizides (“Private Lives,” “Don’t Dress for Dinner,” “Lost in Yonkers”) directs. Set design is by Gary Hygom; lighting design by Sebastian Paczynski; sound by Seamus Naughton; and costumes by Teresa Lebrun. 

“Native Gardens” runs at the Quogue Community Hall from October 21 to November 7, with shows on Thursdays and Fridays at 7, Saturdays at 8 and Sundays at 2:30. An additional matinee performance will be offered during the final weekend of the production, on Saturday, November 6, prior to the regular 8 p.m. performance that evening. A talkback with the cast will be offered following the Friday, October 29, 7 p.m. performance. 

For the safety of all, ticket holders will be required to show a photo ID and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid-19 test within 72 hours of the day of the performance they are attending. Face-covering masks will be required at all times while inside the theater. For more information on safety protocols, visit hamptontheatre.org

Tickets are $36, $31 for seniors, $25 for students under 25, with no additional fees this year. For reservations and information on all packages and available discounts, visit www.hamptontheatre.org or email info@hamptontheatre.org.To reserve tickets, visit www.hamptontheatre.org, or call the Hampton Theatre Company box office at 1-631-653-8955.

First In-Person Film Feast at Renovated Library a Big Success
The first in-person Film Feast in the newly renovated library featuring a screening of “Top Hat” scored high marks with movie lovers. 

As Film Feast committee member Melissa Cook reports: “It was a spectacular evening. The revelers, mostly dressed in black and white, toasted our return (with Prosecco donated by Don and Judy Gruhn) on the library’s terrace after a one-and-a-half-year layoff, with a special salute to Jim Herbert, who founded the Film Feast 25 years ago.

“Then we had dinner under the tent (festooned with lights thanks to Roger Moley) and were treated to the rise of a glorious full moon as we listened to music by Irving Berlin. ‘Top Hat’ was the perfect celebratory film and the beautifully renovated Shinnecock Room resonated with applause after each of Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire’s fantastic dances.

“The library staff were terrific. It was good to be back!”


Below, left, Joy and Dan Flynn dressed for the occasion (Roger Moley Photo); right, Film Feast committee members Melissa Cook and Jim Herbert also donned appropriate attire for the screening of “Top Hat.”

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Fall Forward

Wait. What? Isn’t At Quaquanantuck only supposed to be published once every few weeks now? Wasn’t there just a column last week? What’s going on here?

Put it down to your humble scribe being energized by the changing season. Or maybe it’s because At Quaquanantuck is preparing to brave international travel for two weeks, and filing back-to-back columns is a tip of the hat to uncertainty about what the future holds. 

In the end, it doesn’t really matter. There’s a lot going on in our village and the next column after this one won’t be until October 7 at the earliest, so let’s get started. 

Shine on. —A. Botsford Photo

Wildlife Refuge Maintains Momentum
In every season, all year long, the Quogue Wildlife Refuge remains steadfast in offering educational and culturally enriching programming for all ages, often in partnership with other area organizations; providing an invaluable resource for information about flora, fauna and environmental and ecological issues; caring for the resident injured wildlife; and maintaining the fabulous facilities and trails, which are enjoyed by thousands of East End residents every year.  

Packed with cool stuff to do, the next few weeks offer just a glimpse of the many rolling initiatives of the Refuge personnel. To ensure that you don’t miss anything, bookmark quoguewildliferefuge.org and check it regularly. 

Feeding on the fly. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Near the top of the list of cool stuff to do, consider this weekend’s 14th annual Pine Barrens Discovery Day on Saturday, September 18, featuring scavenger hunt hikes for all ages (children under 12 accompanied by an adult) at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge and the Wertheim Wildlife Refuge in Shirley. 

In Quogue, the scavenger hunt is over a .8 mile trail through the pine barrens and around ponds, looking for—and at—the plants and animals that call the Refuge home. Download the instructions for the hunt by clicking here, or visit the Refuge website and click on Pine Barrens Discovery Day on the Upcoming Events section of the QWR home page.   

The scavenger hunt journey at the Wertheim Refuge will take participants through the Pine Barrens and along the Carmans River in search of plants and animals such as basking turtles and wading birds. 

In both locations, hunters are being challenged to find everything on the list and to take pictures and tag #pinebarrensdiscoveryday2021, in order that they may be highlighted on social media. For details on the scavenger hunts, call 631-218-1177, or email mparrott@pb.state.ny.us

Meanwhile, there are two more sessions of Pondside Painting for adults and teens age 13 and up coming up at the QWR, on Wednesday, September 22, and Wednesday, September 29, from 3 to 5 p.m. each day. Participants learn watercolor techniques before creating their own paintings to take home. If there is still space available, the $35 fee per person covers instruction and all supplies. Payment is due at time of registration;  www.quoguewildliferefuge.org.

It’s beginning to look a lot like … Halloween. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Also on the schedule are an Autumn Equinox Sunset Hike on Wednesday, September 22, at 6:30 p.m.; and an author talk on “The Must See Hiking Destinations of Long Island” on Saturday, September 25, at 11 a.m. For October, the QWR has already set up at Mandala Workshop on October 2; a Bird Walk with Eastern Long Island Audubon Society on Sunday, October 3; Earth Yoga with Amy Hess on October 6 and 13; and another Fall Foliage Paddle on Saturday, October 16.  For more information, visit quoguewildliferefuge.org or call 631-653-4771.


Village residents gathered last Saturday for the rededication of the 9/11 Memorial at the Quogue Firehouse.
The Reverend Nancy Jennings, Mayor Peter Sartorius, Ted Necarsulmer, and Chris Osborne at the 9/11 rededication ceremony on September 11. —Stephanie Wagner Photos

Quogue Library Brings Back the In-Person Film Feasts
While still requiring that masks be worn by all who enter the building, the Quogue Library is continuing the trend of bringing back more in-person programs. 

Coming up this weekend, on Saturday, September 18, the first in-person Film Feast in the newly renovated library will feature a screening of “Top Hat,” the 1935 musical comedy starring Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire at the top of their form. 

Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire in “Top Hat.”

Directed by Mark Sandrich with music and lyrics by Irving Berlin (including, notably, “Cheek to Cheek”), this much-loved film even has an appearance by a very young Lucille Ball as a Flower Clerk. Over the 86 years since it was released, critics have struggled to outdo each other with their raves. 

For example: “Hands down, this is the best Astaire-Rogers musical ever. Nothing more needs to be said.” (The Austin Chronicle) “In one of the best-looking, wittiest, most melodious and stylishly romantic musicals ever made, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers dance and feud from London to a dazzling art deco Venice.” (The Observer)

Or this, by Andre Sennwald, writing for the August 30, 1935 edition of The New York Times: “When ‘Top Hat’ is letting Mr. Astaire perform his incomparable magic or teaming him with the increasingly dexterous Miss Rogers, it is providing the most urbane fun that you will find anywhere on the screen.”

As always, the “price” of admission is a potluck dish to serve at least six people and all are asked to bring their own beverage. Black and white dress and top hats optional; masks required. Email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101, for more information.

Meanwhile, kudos to the library’s Film Feast committee: Melissa Cook, Lynda Confessore, Judy Gruhn, Jim Herbert, Renee McKenna, Roger Moley, and Jaimie Stevens: Great choice!

Two in-person exercise classes are ongoing at the library:  “Stretch, Strengthen, and Lengthen: Open Pilates with Leisa,” offered at 10 a.m. on six Mondays: September 20 and 27 and October 4, 18, and 25; and “A Happy, Healthy Heart: Cardio and Sculpt” offered at 10 a.m. on Tuesdays: September 21 and 28. 

The cost is $10 per in-person class, payable at the library prior to each session. Registration is required for both classes, as space is limited. Email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101 to register. 

Form and function in the clear light of September at Densieski Farms. —Florrie Morrisey Photo

Some splendid virtual programs are also coming up, courtesy of the Quogue Library. On Saturday, September 25, at 3 p.m. Simply Creative Chef Rob Scott will host an “Apple Fest” Facebook Live Event. Apple Fest recipes to be shared during the event include: Fuji Apples and Cinnamon Baked French Toast Casserole; Apple Arugula Walnut Salad with Blue Cheese and Cranberries; and Autumn Apple Pie Muffins/Donuts. 

On Tuesday, September 28, at 6 p.m. the library is sponsoring a live via Zoom talk on “How to Manage Chronic Pain.” And on Wednesday, September 29, at 7 p.m. there will be a live via Zoom talk on “Ovarian Cancer Awareness.” 

Email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101, for details and instructions on how to sign up for these programs. 

An exhibition of works by Marissa Bridge continues at the Quogue Library Art Gallery through September 29.  The artist is known for transforming natural forms into icons of reuse and rebirth, with paint, recycled and found materials finding a new purpose in her work.  

As always, the Quogue Library continues to offer a wide array of programming for children, teens/tweens, families, and adults of all ages. Getting more information and registering is easy: visit www.quoguelibrary.org and simply click on the flier for any program that catches your interest and a registration link or instructions on how to register will pop up.


Quogue Chamber Music presented the Ulysses Quartet in concert in the Quogue Community Hall on Saturday, September 11. —Mary Thames Louis Photo

Reporting on Saturday’s concert, Quogue Chamber Music founder Jane Deckoff wrote to At Quaquanantuck this week: “As you well know, it’s been difficult to put together an indoor performance during these times. We checked for vaccination proof, demanded mask wearing, borrowed the QJTT purifiers, spread out the rows of chairs somewhat, and left the front doors open.  The concert itself, by the young, talented and charming Ulysses Quartet was much loved by the audience. They began the performance by playing Golijov’s “Tenebrae,” a moving and thoughtful way to remember the events of 9/11 exactly 20 years ago. Everyone there seemed excited and relieved to get out and about for a couple of hours. They were also pleased to receive a free glass of wine (served outdoors) during the intermission.” 


Quogue Jazz Trio Continues to Make the Rounds
Delighting all who hear them play, the Quogue Jazz Trio, aka the QJ3, are continuing to follow an established circuit of gigs. 

The QJ3—Roger Moley, Mark Stevens, and Dan Richman—on a break at Peconic Bay Vineyards.

With Roger Moley on standup bass, Dan Richman on guitar, and Mark Stevens on traps, the tight ensemble is scheduled to return to Starr Boggs restaurant in Westhampton Beach tomorrow, Friday, September 17, playing outdoors out back (weather permitting) from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Reservations are required for tables, call 631-288-3500; outdoor bar seating may be available without reservations on a first-come, first served basis.

On Saturday, September 18, the band will be back in the gazebo at the Farmer’s Market on the Village Green in Westhampton Beach from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. A chance to shop for fresh produce, farm fresh eggs and all manner of other goodies while listening to the certified fresh sounds of the QJ3, and maybe catch a glimpse of the charming sight of happy toddlers swarming the stage. 

On Saturday, September 25, and Sunday, September 26, the QJ3 will be playing at Peconic Bay Vineyards at 31320 Main Road in Cutchogue, from 1 to 4 p.m. both days. Reservations are required for the Vineyards dates; call 631-734-7361.

Peter Reynes Vermylen
On Wednesday, September 1, Peter Reynes Vermylen, 72, died after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease. 

Born in Brooklyn and raised in Hillsdale, New Jersey, Peter attended Bergen Catholic in Oradell, New Jersey, before going on to study English at Georgetown University, graduating in 1971. While at Georgetown, he met his future wife, Cathy Moran of Trinity College. 

After completing his training with the U.S. Army reserve, he joined Chase Manhattan Bank, where he worked as a commercial banker. He later joined Salomon Brothers, where he became a top investment banker for multiple industries until his retirement. 

Peter Vermylen at Jackson Hole, WY circa 2009.

After moving to Quogue from Chatham Township, New Jersey, in 2001 after his retirement, Peter became an active member of the Concerned Citizens of Quogue, a volunteer reader at Little Flower in Wading River, and co-founded Yellowfin Capital Management. In his later years, his family said he loved his daily visits to the deck at the Surf Club to watch the ocean. 

His family and friends will miss his sense of humor, the puppet shows he created for his children, seeing him “ride the wild surf” on a boogie board, and accompanying him on trips he planned to the Caribbean, “where he was at his happiest and best.” 

In addition to his wife of 49 years, Cathy Moran Vermylen, he is survived by his children, Michael (Emily), Thomas (Ashley), and John, and seven grandchildren. All in the family joined in offering a special note of thanks to Peter’s loving and compassionate caregivers. 

Funeral services were held on September 6 and 7 through Werner & Rothwell Funeral Home in Westhampton Beach and the Immaculate Conception Church. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (michaeljfox.org).

Otis Treat Bradley Jr.
Otis Treat Bradley Jr. died on Sunday, September 12. He was 89.

Born in 1931 in New York City to Otis Treat and Marian Alling Bradley, Otis was raised in Manhattan, where he graduated from the Buckley School before continuing his education at Phillips Exeter Academy, Yale, and New York University School of Business. He served two years as a navigator in the U.S. Air Force in the late 1950s. 

Young Otis Bradley Jr.

Upon completing his service, Otis began a long and distinguished career on Wall Street as a securities analyst—first at Spencer Trask, later at Alex. Brown and Sons, and finally retiring in his 80s from Gilford Securities. Institutional Investor Magazine named Otis five times to the roster of their All-America Research Team, twice as the number one analyst in the electronics and technology sector. 

A prolific writer, Otis penned countless issues of his Growth, Technology and Change research report, into which he poured his optimistic belief in the power of technology companies to make money for investors while improving the lives of every individual. 

A lifelong tennis and platform tennis enthusiast, Otis holds the Quogue Field Club record for the highest number of tennis tournament events entered in a single season (11). Quogue Field Club tennis pro Doug Lewis wrote this week that Otis “used to be the king of the B’s and regularly was either winner or finalist. He also won most of the senior events.”

“The nickname I gave Otis was ‘Mr. August’ because he came alive during the August Club Championship season.”

Otis married Patricia Timothy Place in 1955, and the couple had five children: Christopher, Andrew (deceased), Timothy, Marian and Ruth. He married a second time to Robin Rees, and following a divorce, married Marcia Fox-Martin Miller, whose daughter, Hillary, he subsequently adopted. 

Otis Bradley Jr. in Africa in the 1980s.

Summering in Westhampton Beach since childhood, Otis moved to Quogue with Marcia in the 1970s and developed a community of family and friends there. 

His close friend Allen Adler wrote this week that “Otis was a most impressive man. He had great presence, looks, and confidence. When playing sports, he was not only an outstanding competitor, he was a leader and a dominant personality. Our countless hours on the paddle courts are among my fondest memories. 

“He had an outstanding, long-term Wall Street career.  When I met him in the early 70s he was known as Mr. IBM, having authored the first extensive, highly detailed research report on the IBM business model, which established him as a go-to analyst on IBM and other major computer stocks of that era.

“Otis was an extraordinary friend. Although he spoke his mind and was very candid, he could be counted on to be supportive of others when encouragement was called for. He was full of charm and a wonderful storyteller. Who could forget his tales of the hurricane of 1938?  

“We talked or visited or shared a meal nearly every time Frances and I were out in Quogue. He will be more than missed.” 

A true gentleman whose charming and unassuming manner could best be described as courtly, Otis was beloved by many. He is survived by his wife, Marcia, his sister, Marian, his brother, Michael, his five children, his numerous nieces and nephews, to whom he was Uncle O, and his nine grandchildren, to whom he was the loveable and irrepressible GranpO.

Interment at the Quogue Cemetery on Friday will be private. A memorial service will be planned at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to East End Hospice.


Westhampton Beach High School grad Justin Shui with his mother, Keri. Justin was awarded the Jean Carbone Volunteerism Scholarship and is now studying business at Suffolk County Community College. —Big Chill Photo

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Septober Begins

So, Labor Day has come and gone, and with it all those thoughts about what you wanted to do this summer that you never did, or didn’t do enough of. But take heart: we are now headed into the heart of Septober, the finest month(s), meteorologically speaking, on the East End. 

Unbroken wave. —A. Botsford Photo

Yes, the days are shorter, but the temperature tends toward the perfect for all manner of outdoor recreation, the air is drier, the ocean warm, the fishing good, traffic lighter, personal space expanding, tables available at restaurants, cool cultural enrichment abounds. And, oh, the golden light of the magic hour down by the dunes. 

Let’s get down to it: here’s what you need to know for planning this weekend and next.

Rededication of 9/11 Memorial
True to form, the Quogue Volunteer Fire Department is sponsoring and hosting a rededication on Saturday, September 11, at 10 a.m. to mark the completion of a renovation of the 9/11 memorial at the Firehouse on Jessup Avenue.

All are invited to join Mayor Peter Sartorius, members of the Quogue Village Board of Trustees, and two speakers from the QFD at the ceremony. Seems a great way to start that particular day, 20 years on from the fall of the twin towers.

Quogue beach on August 22 as Henri swept by to the east. —Scott Moger Photo

Quogue Chamber Music Presents Ulysses String Quartet
Quogue Chamber Music will close its 2021 season on Saturday, September 11, with a concert at 7:30 p.m. at the Quogue Community Hall by the Ulysses String Quartet in a program of Golijov, Haydn, Ali-Zadeh and Mendelssohn.

The program being performed in Quogue will include “Tenebrae” (in honor of the 20th anniversary of 9/11) by Golijov, “Sunrise” Quartet by Haydn, Rəqs (Dance) by Ali-Zadeh and Quartet in E-flat Major by Mendelssohn.

Tickets are $50 for adults; $5 for students. Checks payable to Quogue Chamber Music may be mailed to PO Box 1984, Quogue, New York 11959; or purchase tickets online on the QCM website, www.quoguechambermusic.org.  No tickets will be sold at the door. 

Due to Covid restrictions, all ticket holders must show proof of vaccination at the entrance and will be required to wear a mask throughout the concert.

The Ulysses Quartet will perform at the Quogue Community Hall on Saturday, September 11. —Matthew Holler Photo

Consisting of Christina Bouey and Rhiannon Banerdt on violin, Colin Brookes on viola and Grace Ho on cello, the quartet’s members hail from Canada, the United States and Taiwan. They hold degrees from the Juilliard School, Manhattan School of Music, New England Conservatory and Yale University.

Founded in the summer of 2015, the Ulysses String Quartet won the grand prize and gold medal in the senior string division of the 2016 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition and first prize in the 2018 Schoenfeld International String Competition. They were winners of the Vietnam International Music Competition in 2019, and recipients of a Salon de Virtuosi 2021 Career Grant. 

From 2017 to 2019, Ulysses was in residence at the Louis Moreau Institute in New Orleans, working with composer Morris Rosenzweig. In fall 2019, the Ulysses Quartet were named as Lisa Arnhold Fellows of the Juilliard School, an appointment that has been extended through May 2022. For more information, visit www.quoguechambermusic.org.


All set for the big duck drop on August 20: Lynn Lomas, Mark Stevens, John Rasulo, Bob Beck, and Bob Treuhold. —Stefanie Beck Photo
Stefanie Beck presents the $500 check to Duck Race first place winner Siri Fink.

Wildlife Refuge Embracing New Season
Some great programs coming up to make the most of the great outdoors in beautiful surroundings at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge in the coming weeks. 

First up will be Pondside Painting for adults and teens age 13 and up, offered on three Wednesdays: September 15, 22, and 29, from 3 to 5 p.m. each day. Participants will learn watercolor techniques before creating their own paintings to take home. The $35 fee per person covers instruction and all supplies. Payment is due at time of registration as space is limited. www.quoguewildliferefuge.org

Also on the schedule are an Autumn Equinox Sunset Hike on Wednesday, September 22, at 6:30 p.m.; three time slots for a partially guided Private Foliage Paddle on Saturday, September 25; and an author talk on “The Must See Hiking Destinations of Long Island” on Saturday, September 25, at 11 a.m. More details on these programs next week. For more information, visit quoguewildliferefuge.org or call 631-653-4771.

Dennis Romano, curator Liz Hartman, and Bob Murray at the “Visons of Nature” art exhibition at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge on August 21. —J. Neely Photo
Photographer Rob Seifert was one of the exhibiting artists. —J. Neely Photo
Matt Hoge, Pam Chance, and Wildlife Refuge Associate Director Marisa Nelson at the “Visions of Nature” exhibition. —J. Neely Photo

In-Person Exercise Returns to Quogue Library
Great to see more in-person programs returning to the library, which is now requiring that masks  be worn by all who enter the building. 

Two in-person exercise classes begin next week. First up is “Stretch, Strengthen, and Lengthen: Open Pilates with Leisa,” offered at 10 a.m. on six Mondays: September 13, 20, and 27 and October 4, 18, and 25. 

A Happy, Healthy Heart: Cardio and Sculpt” will be offered at 10 a.m. on Tuesdays: September 14, 21 and 28. 

The cost is $10 per in-person class, payable at the library prior to each session. 

There’s also an in-person Adult Paint Party with Marie Camenares tomorrow, Friday, September 10, at 4 p.m. The $10 fee, payable upon registration, covers all supplies (provided) and instruction. 

Email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101, right away to see if there are any spaces left.  

And in-person Film Feasts are coming back; the first film up will be “Top Hat” on Saturday, September 16, at 6:15 p.m. As always, the “price” of admission is a potluck dish to serve at least six people and bring your own beverage. Black and white dress and top hats optional; masks required. More on the first Film Feast next week. Email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101, for more information.

An exhibition of works by Marissa Bridge will be on view at the Quogue Library Art Gallery through September 29.   

Meanwhile, the Quogue Library continues to offer an incredibly wide array of programming for children, teens/tweens, families, and adults of all ages. Getting more information and registering is easy: visit www.quoguelibrary.org and simply click on the flier for any program that catches your interest and a registration link will pop up.

Hazy morning. —Rosemary Cline Photo

Foreign Policy Association Looks at “The Two Koreas”
The next installment of this year’s Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program, offered live and via Zoom on Saturday, September 11, at 5 p.m., will focus on what the future might hold for the U.S. relationship with the Republic of Korea. 

The strategically significant question stems from the potential for South Korea to end up in the middle of two superpowers as the rift between the U.S. and China widens.  

Facilitator Susan Perkins reminded At Quaquanantuck recently that the Great Decisions program is not a lecture followed by a Q&A, but a live participant discussion moderated by David Rowe after a 25-minute documentary on the particular topic at hand. To sign up for the September 11 program, visit www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the FPA Great Decisions “The Two Koreas” flier on the home page, or email info@quoguelibrary.org.

Vaughn Exhibition Continues at Quogue Gallery
Barbara Vaughn: Beyond the Sea,” an exhibition featuring 11 works by the artist, continues at the Quogue Gallery at 44 Quogue Street through September 30. Seven of the works on view are the stylized reflections the artist is known for; four are part of the artist’s “Apart Together” series.  

Barbara Vaughn, “Avalon” (2020), 23 x 35. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

The “Apart Together” series is a body of work created while the artist was sheltering-in-place in the spring of 2020. 

Barbara Vaughn is a fine-art photographer based in San Francisco and New York City. Her exploration of the parameters of vision and cognition provided the impetus to document abstraction in the real world. The resulting close-up details of urban tableaux and her mesmerizing reflections in moving water challenge the viewer to recreate the original scenes and engage the power of imagination in unexpected ways. 

Since 2013, her signature waterscapes and other photographic series have been the subject of 12 solo and numerous group shows in the U.S. and internationally. Vaughn graduated from Princeton University and attended the International Center of Photography in NYC, in addition to other photographic programs. She is represented by several galleries in the U.S. and her artwork is in numerous prestigious private collections.

For further information, visit www.Quoguegallery.com or telephone 631-653-6236. 

Haywire All In on Changing Season
It’s just like fashionista Raenell Murray of Haywire to get the jump on fall with a summer sale on jewelry and ladies’ clothing, including new fall cashmeres and trousers and snappy raincoats in a bunch of splashy autumn colors, all available at 50 to 75 percent off. 

New tops and trousers are included in the end of summer sale at Haywire.

The sale continues through September 26 only; call 631-283-2809 to set up an appointment. 

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Home Stretch

Nothing like a little shark scare to liven up the waning weeks of summer around these parts. 

While the beaches west of the canal were only closed for about 24 hours from Tuesday into Wednesday, still it gives swimmers headed for the buoys a little pause when they can see the large numbers of menhaden (bunker) splashing about and creating nervous water at the surface: are they chasing smaller fish, or being chased by much bigger fish? 

Probably best to leave that an open question and get back to knee deep water … or get out altogether and observe from the shore.

Meanwhile, shame on CBS news (newyork.cbslocal.com) for the preposterous headline: “Police: Pack of 18-Foot Sharks Comes Dangerously Close to West Hampton Dunes Shore.” Yes, the sharks came close to shore, for sharks, but “dangerously close”? And photos show definitively that they were about a third the length reported. As if the news media didn’t have enough of a credibility problem.

Ankle deep water looks more inviting when there are sharks being spotted beyond the breakers. —A. Botsford Photo

Big Race Is Everything It’s Quacked Up to Be, and More
The big day has almost arrived: the Quogue Association Duck Race and free Quackapalooza Festival at the finish line by the Village Dock at the end of Quogo Neck are slated tomorrow, Friday, August 20

The race begins with the traditional duck dump from the Quogue Bridge at 5 p.m., which is also the start time for the party down at the dock. The celebration will rave on until 7 p.m. with beer, wine and water provided, and music from the band Souled Out. BYO picnic goodies. This year’s winning duck will be awarded $500; second place prize is $250 and third place wins $150. 

No one knows if the Coolest Duck Ever will be on hand in (plastic) person for the exciting finish of the QA Duck Race on Friday, but everyone knows she’ll be there in spirit. —Stefanie Beck Photo

Anyone still holding ducks marked with racer’s name and phone number can bring them down to the Quogue Bridge before 5 p.m. on August 20 to make sure they’re included in the multitude of plastic waterfowl being dropped to start the race. 

In other news, at the invitation of the Quogue Association, Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman will visit our fair village to deliver his “State of the Town” address on Saturday, September 4, at 10 a.m.

Association organizers are hoping that Mr. Schneiderman can deliver his address outdoors on the  Village Green, in which case the citizenry will be asked to bring their own chairs. If rain threatens, the Association will advise of alternate plans, most likely via email blast. Residents can also check the Quogue Association website, www.quogueassociation.org

The best way to be sure you are on the Association email list and don’t miss any of the QA communiqués, of course, is to make sure you have renewed your existing membership or have joined the Association. The process is simple: visit www.quogueassociation.org and click on the “Join/Donate” tab on the upper right of the home page. 


At a costume fitting for the QJTT production of “Frozen Jr.,” running August 24 through 27 at the Quogue Community Hall, cast members get their elaborate ice on. Ticket information at http://www.qjttonline.org. —Sue Prior Photo

Meet the “Visions of Nature” Artists at Wildlife Refuge August 21
Seven area artists and photographers will showcase works that represent their visions of nature and wildlife in a special one-day-only exhibition and artists’ reception at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, August 21, from 4 to 6 p.m. A portion of proceeds from sales will benefit the Refuge. 

On display will be paintings, photographs, and mixed media works from artists Steve Alpert, Jean Arena, Marissa Bridge, Kevin Ferris, Susie Gilbert, John Renner, and Rob Seifert

Photographers Ferris, Gilbert, Renner and Seifert have long used nature and wildlife as their muse; Alpert, Arena, and Bridge have more recently been drawn to the flora, fauna and landscapes of the East End as their subjects. All seven artists share a deep reverence for the natural world and all are united in a desire to support the Quogue Wildlife Refuge

The 305-acre, non-profit nature preserve, founded in 1934, is open to the public from sunrise to sunset 365 days a year. In addition to its seven miles of trails, QWR is also home to permanently injured wildlife including owls, hawks, a fox and other native New York animals. The exhibition is curated by Elizabeth Anne Hartman of Hartman On Hudson a Quogue-based art consulting, services, and resources company. Masks or face coverings will be required for all visitors to the indoor art exhibition. The artists’ reception will be held on the deck of the Nature Center. 

“Sandy Shark,” oil on canvas by Steve Alpert.

“Putting paint on canvas is everything to me,” says Manhattan and Quogue based artist Steve Alpert. “The images I make in oil paint are my ambassadors of love, honor and respect for all life.” The artist’s passion for nature is a common subject on richly painted canvases in which saturated hues are applied with creamy brush strokes, according to a release from Hartman On Hudson. Living within walking distance of the Refuge, Alpert is deeply connected to what he describes as “a quiet and beautiful place dedicated to the serenity of pure nature.” Sandy Shark, oil on canvas by Steve Alpert 

“Boy with Frog at Quogue Wildlife Refuge,” oil on canvas by Jean Arena.

A former creative director for various advertising agencies, Jean Arena began her fine art studies at New York’s Art Students League, where her initial focus was the figure and portraiture. That changed once she began living full-time in Remsenburg. Surrounded by vistas bathed in the light that has been a beacon for artists for more than a hundred years, she has turned toward plein air landscape painting while not entirely giving up the figure.

“Tree of Life,” bas relief by Marissa Bridge.

A graduate of the Parsons School of Design, Quogue-based artist Marissa Bridge puts flower imagery at the core of current work that is imagined in myriad, marvelous incarnations, according to the Hartman On Hudson release. For materials, the artist uses bits of nature itself, such as seeds and stones, along with wire, beads, pearls, modeling paste, gesso, paper, and papier maché. Some pieces allude to flower and tree iconography, others have evolved into celestial imagery.  

“Teton Barn,” digital photograph by Kevin Ferris.

Landscapes, birds, mammals, reptiles and insects are the predominant subjects of New York City-based photographer Kevin Ferris. While he has travelled and captured images of nature throughout the country, he is most often found photographing on eastern Long Island along the north and south forks. He is the recipient of several awards from Nature’s Best Photography magazine. Some of his photographs permanently grace the walls of the Quogue Wildlife Refuge Nature Center, and his photography has been featured several times in At Quaquanantuck to illustrate items about the Quogue Wildlife Refuge.

“Smoke Tree 1,” Archival Pigment Print by Susie Gilbert.

After a career in book publishing, Susie Gilbert turned her attention to fine art photography and studied at New York’s International Center for Photography under Carol Dragon, an acclaimed photographer and teacher. Based in both New York and Quogue, Gilbert finds inspiration in the natural environments of both, from the trees of Central Park to the East End’s ocean waves. “I have always loved how a photograph can transform the mundane into art,” she says, “how an everyday detail becomes beautiful or haunting through the lens of a camera.”

“Against the Wind,” digital print on acrylic by John Renner.

John Renner took his first photographs with black and white film, many of them candid portraits. He spent years in his darkroom drawing out shapes and tones from the shadows to make something elusive into a lasting image. John has always embraced the natural world. Attracted to its contours and colors, he creates photographs that capture nature’s beauty, especially the distinct seasons of Long Island.  

“Stone Bench at Quogue Wildlife Refuge, digital photograph by Robert Seifert.

As a native of Long Island’s south shore, Robert Seifert has long had a deep appreciation for the outdoors, and more specifically the unique and picturesque landscapes of Long Island. His professional nature photography grew out of his career as a graphic artist and creative director, after he noticed a dearth of quality local photography in professionally designed communications materials. After becoming well-versed in the technical skills to help him address this void, he developed a passion for the local environment that gave rise to his current oeuvre, a blend of fine art and highly technical photography.

The exhibition and meet-the-artists reception will be held on Saturday, August 21, 2021, from 4 to 6 p.m at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, 3 Old Country Road, Quogue, NY 11959.

And, if you haven’t already, be sure to make a donation to the QWR Summer Appeal, a fundraiser established in lieu of the Wild Night for Wildlife benefit. Donations can be made directly on the QWR website, www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, or by clicking on this link, quoguewildliferefuge.org/summerappeal.


Andrew Perel recently completed firefighter training at the Suffolk County Fire Academy in Yaphank, qualifying him for the traditional wet down “welcome to the brotherhood, Quogue Firefighter Andrew Perel.” A report from an anonymous firefighter at the scene reveals that Andrew “thought he was posing for a pic for the Quogue column … he was … We just added water…Photo courtesy of Quogue Volunteer Fire Department

Alexandra Andrews Reading at Library Is Fully Booked
The popularity of “Who Is Maud Dixon?” author Alexandra Andrews—coupled with library patrons’ fervent desire to return to live sessions of the Conversations with the Author series—has translated into the novelist’s appearance on Sunday, August 22, being fully booked. 

Though space is limited, there may still be time to register for a Local Author Talk with Daisy Dowling today, Thursday, August 19, at 6:30 p.m. Sought-after executive coach, talent expert and working mom Daisy Dowling will discuss the handbook she wrote for working parents, “Workparent: The Complete Guide to Succeeding on the Job, Staying True to Yourself, and Raising Happy Kids.” 

Email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101, right away to see if there are any spaces left.  

As more and more live programs are scheduled at the library, clearly it behooves patrons to register early. Consider, for example, the Saturday, August 21, program, “Cutting the Cord: Alternatives to Cable TV.” Offered at 10 a.m., this will be an in-person program for all those people looking to avoid hefty cable bills, led by Quogue Library IT Director Russell Weisenbacher.  

Because space is limited, registration is required; email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101. 

Another in-person program is coming up at the library on Saturday, August 21, with Chef Rob offering a workshop on Lite Italian Fare from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Participants will learn how to make Bread Stick Salad and a Chicken Salad in Lettuce Cups. Cost is $10 per person, due at time of registration, which is required due to limited space; email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101. 

Library patrons can learn how to design for 3D printing on Tuesday, August 24, at 4 p.m. in Part I of Introduction to Tinkercard. Participants will learn how a 3D printer works and tips and tricks for successful prints. Part 2 will be offered on Tuesday, August 31, also at 4 p.m. and participants will work with the Long Island Science Center to create one original design per session.

The Origins of Rome: Myths and Legends of the Eternal City” is another in-person program coming up on Thursday, August 26, at 5 p.m. Giuliana Castellani Koch Ph.D. will lead patrons through the epic literature and historical evidence of the origins of Rome as imagined by some of the greatest artists of all time.

As noted, registration is required for these in-person programs as space is limited; email info@quoguelibrary.org or call 631-653-4224, ext. 101. 

Bill Bratton —NYT photo

Former New York City Police Commissioner, police reformer and now author Bill Bratton will be at the library for an author talk moderated by Andrew Botsford on Friday, September 3, at 5 p.m. 

Mr. Bratton’s book, “The Profession: A Memoir of Community, Race, and the Arc of Policing in America,” which he co-wrote with Peter Knobler, was described this way in the New York Times review: “Engaging … a remarkably candid account … Succeeding as a centrist in public life these days can be an almost impossible task. But centrism in law enforcement may be the most delicate challenge of all. Bratton’s ability to practice it was a startling phenomenon.” 

Tickets are $20 and registration for this in-person program (at your earliest convenience) is in-person only at the Quogue Library at 90 Quogue Street. 

“Moon Flower” (2018), a mixed media work by Marissa Bridge. An exhition of the artist’s work opens at the Quogue Library Art Gallery on August 28. —Image courtesy of Quogue Library

The Quogue Photography Exhibit,” featuring photography by Susie Gilbert, Veronique Louis, Lauren Lyons, Peter Moore, Reid + Factor, and Victoria Sartorius, will remain on view through August 25.

Starting on August 28, an exhibition of works by Marissa Bridge will be on view at the Quogue Library Art Gallery through September 29. An opening reception for the new exhibition will be held on Saturday, August 28, from 4 to 5:30 p.m.  


Artists and art lovers were undeterred by the sweltering heat on Saturday, August 14, and turned out in good numbers for the Quogue Historical Society Art Show & Sale. Below, Art Show & Sale Chair Donna Levy, center, with Donna Sessa, left, and Cecilia Lazarescu. —Joy Flynn Photos

Last Weekend for Clementine; Barbara Vaughn Next at Quogue Gallery
This is the last weekend for visitors to see “Clementine: Selfless in a Selfie World,” featuring 15 works newly created by the artist, at the Quogue Gallery at 44 Quogue Street. 

Coming up next at the gallery will be “Barbara Vaughn: Beyond the Sea,” running from August 26 to September 30, with an artist reception scheduled on Friday, August 27, from 5 to 7 p.m.  

The exhibition will feature 11 works by the artist: seven featuring the stylized reflections on water she is known for; and the other four part of the artist’s “Apart Together” series. 

Barbara-Vaughn, “Kaiki” (2021), Pigment Print on Cold Press Rag Paper, 34 x 62. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

The “Apart Together” series is a body of work created while the artist was sheltering-in-place in the spring of 2020. Describing the new series, Vaughn wrote: “The collective experience of being torn from our livelihoods, relationships and routines during the Covid-19 crisis provided the impetus to incorporate the act of tearing into my artwork. Working with available materials at home—an archive of my photographic prints, basic cutting tools and my two hands—I began selectively and meticulously rending apart and assembling together portions of disparate images.” 

“The source materials included photographs of layered posters, advertisements and billboards in varying states of deterioration, disparate water images, and macro details of textured brush strokes from paintings by Ed Clark. The resulting amalgamations portray surreal unfamiliarity and reference the upheaval of the art world, but also offer hope for positive change from this cataclysm.” 

Barbara Vaughn is a fine-art photographer based in San Francisco and New York City. Her exploration of the parameters of vision and cognition provided the impetus to document abstraction in the real world. The resulting close-up details of urban tableaux, and her mesmerizing reflections in moving water, challenge the viewer to recreate the original scenes and engage the power of imagination in unexpected ways. 

Since 2013, her signature waterscapes and other photographic series have been the subject of 12 solo and numerous group shows in the U.S. and internationally. Vaughn graduated from Princeton University and attended the International Center of Photography in NYC, in addition to other photographic programs. She is represented by several galleries in the U.S. and her artwork is in numerous prestigious private collections.

For further information, visit www.Quoguegallery.com or telephone 631-653-6236.

Ulysses String Quartet Presented by Quogue Chamber Music September 11
Quogue Chamber Music will close its 2021 season on Saturday, September 11, with a concert at 7:30 p.m. at the Quogue Community Hall by the Ulysses String Quartet in a program of Golijov (in memory of the 20th anniversary of 9/11), Haydn, Ali-Zedah and Mendelssohn.

Tickets are $50 for adults; $5 for students. Checks payable to Quogue Chamber Music may be mailed to PO Box 1984, Quogue, New York 11959; or purchase tickets online on the QCM website, www.quoguechambermusic.org.  No tickets will be sold at the door. 

Due to Covid restrictions, all ticket holders must show proof of vaccination at the entrance and will be required to wear a mask throughout the concert.

The Ulysses String Quartet will perform at Quogue Community Hall on Saturday, September 11. —M. Holler Photo

Founded in the summer of 2015, the Ulysses String Quartet won the grand prize and gold medal in the senior string division of the 2016 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition and first prize in the 2018 Schoenfeld International String Competition. 

Consisting of Christina Bouey and Rhiannon Banerdt on violin, Colin Brookes on viola and Grace Ho on cello, the quartet’s members hail from Canada, the United States and Taiwan. They hold degrees from the Juilliard School, Manhattan School of Music, New England Conservatory and Yale University. 

The program being performed in Quogue will include “Tenebrae” by Golijov, “Sunrise” Quartet by Haydn, Reqs Dance by Ali-Zadeh and Quartet in E-flat Major by Mendelssohn.

Shorebirds at the shore: sanderlings on the sand. —Florrie Morrisey Photo

“Cryptozoo” and “All the Streets Are Silent” Wrap PAC Film Series
“Cryptozoo” and “All the Streets Are Silent” will be the final two films in the 2021 World Cinema summer series at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center. 

Cryptozoo,” directed by Dash Shaw and screening on Tuesday and Wednesday, August 24 and 25, is a hand-drawn, gritty and fantastical animation parable about society versus the individual. The voiceover cast includes: Michael Cera, Lake Bell, Zoe Kazan, Louisa Krause, and Jason Schwartzman and Peter Stormare. 

A zoo that rescues mythological creatures in psychedelic 1960s San Francisco races the U.S. military to find and save a Baku, a Japanese dream-eating cryptid, to prevent the military from using the Baku to eat the dreams of the counterculture and suppress the anti-Vietnam War movement.

“‘Cryptozoo’ winds up as a window into a decidedly uncommercial mind, and a form of storytelling that isn’t the practiced, polished committee effort that comes out of animation houses like Disney and DreamWorks.” (Polygon)

“This time out, Shaw (in collaboration with animation director Jane Samborski) is even more assured as both a storyteller and as a crafter of images, be they outrageous or gorgeous, haunting or hilarious.” (TheWrap)

All the Streets Are Silent,” a documentary directed by Jeremy Elkin, will be screened at the PAC on Tuesday and Wednesday, August 31 and September 1. 

The full title of the documentary is “All the Streets Are Silent: The Convergence of Hip Hop and Skateboarding.” In the late ’80s and early ’90s, the streets of downtown Manhattan were the site of a collision between two vibrant subcultures: skateboarding and hip hop. Narrated by Zoo York co-founder Eli Gesner with an original score by legendary hip-hop producer Large Professor (Nas, A Tribe Called Quest), “All the Streets Are Silent” brings to life the magic of the time period and the convergence that created a style and visual language that would have an outsized and enduring cultural effect. 

From the DJ booths and dance floors of the Mars nightclub to the founding of brands like Supreme, this convergence would lay the foundation for modern street style. “All the Streets Are Silent” is a love letter to New York—examining race, society, fashion, and street culture.

Writing for Film Threat, the critic Dante James said: “This inside look into a time in counterculture that was unique, special, and will probably never happen again is well-crafted. The story is lively, and the mixing of music, skateboarding, interviews, and footage of the past is amazing. It doesn’t matter if you’re a “hip hop head,” a skater, or a stockbroker. You’ll be engaged from beginning to end.” 

Films in the summer series are screened on Tuesday and Wednesday at 7:30, with commentary on Tuesday evenings only. Film descriptions and trailers are available on the PAC website, www.whbpac.org. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit whbpac.org and click on Films

Raenell Murray of Haywire has raincoats in a variety of colors on sale at 75 percent off in the sale barn.

Haywire Summer Sendoff
Dedicated fashionista Raenell Murray of Haywire is looking ahead to the next season, with some snappy raincoats in a bunch of cool colors available at 75 percent off in her sale barn through mid-September. 

As savvy readers know, Raenell is continuing the practice she initiated last summer, inviting faithful customers as well as new friends to come to her house to see all of the clothing items she has for sale.

Regular priced items are in the house and the barn is dedicated to sale items. All are invited to come see fabulous French capris and trousers, cashmere sweaters, shawls, colorful tops, jewelry—the new shipment of raincoats—and more. Call 631-283-2809 or email raenellmu1@aol.com to set up an appointment.

Write America Marches On from New Base
There is sad news and reassuring news this week about “Write America: A Reading for Our Country,” the Monday night series of beautiful readings and stimulating discussions aimed at reaching out to find commonality across some of the rifts roiling our nation. 

Lora Tucker

Up until now (and for the next few weeks) the weekly installments of the series are aired on Monday evenings at 7 p.m. on the Crowdcast channel hosted by Book Revue, the wonderful, community minded gem of an independent bookstore located in Huntington, typically hosted by the charming and indefatigable Loren Limongelli. 

The sad news, announced this week, is twofold, in that Book Revue is on the verge of closing, and Ms. Limongelli has given her notice. The reassuring news is that series creator Roger Rosenblatt has already arranged a new partnership with Byrd’s Books in Bethel, Connecticut, which he describes as “a model of a knowledgeable, careful, first rate independent bookstore.”

Robert Reeves

Byrd’s was founded and is run by Alice Hutchinson, whom Roger calls “a civic activist with an impressive array of skills, and a learned and devoted bookseller.” Ms. Hutchinson will succeed Loren as the host of the program, which will retain its current format, Monday schedule and 7 p.m. air time, as well as the Crowdcast platform that worked well for Book Revue.

Emma Walton Hamilton

The next four Write America programs will be broadcast on the Crowdcast channel hosted by Book Revue, with Bridget Walsh as the moderator. Following the September 13 program, a two-week hiatus will allow Mr. Rosenblatt and Ms. Hutchinson to set up the Byrd’s Books Crowdcast channel, with the first reading on that platform on Monday, October 4. 

For now, the lineup for Write America looks like this: On Monday, August 23, social worker, poet and activist Lora Tucker and award-winning poet Lindsay Adkins will be the guest writers; on Monday, August 30, the readers will be two novelists and short story writers, Robert Reeves and Jill McCorkle; on September 6, author and theatrical director Emma Walton Hamilton will be joined by award-winning novelist Hilma Wolitzer; and for the final program based at Book Revue on September 13, the guests will be emerging writer Jillian LaRussa and award-winning author and playwright (and series creator) Roger Rosenblatt

Write America runs weekly, every Monday at 7 p.m. EST on Book Revue’s Crowdcast channel. All events are free; registration is required at bookrevue.com/write-america-series. A selection of signed titles will be available for purchase with each Write America episode; Book Revue ships worldwide. For more information, click here or visit bookrevue.com/write-america-series.

Calling All Young Choristers!
Reader Alison Weiskopf this week reiterated an invitation that has been included in all the updates this summer about services at the Church of the Atonement on Quogue Street. To wit, the Church “welcomes all children and grandchildren age 7 to 14 to participate in the choir on Sundays. No singing experience necessary and everyone is welcome. 

“Choristers should arrive at 9 a.m. for rehearsal and stay through the 10 a.m. service, which wraps up around 11. The church follows all Covid-19 safety protocols.” The junior choir is led by Patricia Osborne Feiler, organist and choir director. As detailed below, Sunday, September 5, will be the last day of services at the Church of the Atonement for summer 2021.

Besides the joy of being able to participate in a lovely Quogue tradition, Ms. Weiskopf noted that “choristers will be rewarded with a candy treat and a small sum of money weekly. Older and more experienced choristers may also have the opportunity to serve as acolytes.

“Again, all young singers are welcome. Please contact Alison Weiskopf (aweiskopf@mac.com) and Mary Vogel (m.vogel@verizon.net) for more information.”

Final Three Sundays for Church of the Atonement Season
The Reverend Zachary Thompson will officiate at the 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. services at the Church of the Atonement for one more Sunday, on August 22. 

The Reverend Stephen Setzer

Prior to joining the staff at St. James’ Church in Manhattan as Vicar, Rev. Thompson served as Rector and Associate Priest in Atlanta, as well as Chaplain to Emory University.

On Sunday, August 29, the Reverend Stephen Setzer will officiate at the 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. services.

Rev. Setzer is the priest-in-charge at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Park Slope, Brooklyn, where he lives with his wife, Yoana. He studied at Wycliffe College, University of Toronto, and has worked at St. Matthew’s Cathedral in Dallas, Texas, and also at Christ Church Christiana Hundred in Wilmington, Delaware. He writes weekly at www.sacrdsociety.com

The Reverend Michael Ambler will officiate at this season’s final services at the Church of the Atonement on Sunday, September 5. 

Rev. Ambler is Canon to the Ordinary for the Diocese of Maine and is the former Rector of Grace Church in Bath, Maine. He and his family visit his parents in Quogue often; as a child he was a member of the choir and an acolyte at the Church of the Atonement. 

The Reverend Michael Ambler

He earned his Master of Divinity degree from Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, MA. Rev. Ambler and his wife, Darreby, have three children: Michael III is a political campaign consultant; John is currently on leave from his work at TIST, an international conservation and development group, while he pursues a business degree at Cambridge in the UK; and Elizabeth works with a Middle East based NGO on issues of food security.

Following the traditional schedule, Communion is offered every week at the 8 a.m. service and Morning Prayer at 10 a.m.; on the first Sunday of the month, Communion is offered at both services. 

Masks are required at services, according to a notification from the church, “until we are sure it is safe for everyone.” All children in the community, age 7 to 14, are invited to sing in the junior choir, which is led by Patricia Osborne Feiler, organist and choir director. Rehearsals are held at 9 a.m. on Sunday mornings. For additional information regarding the junior choir, contact Mary Vogel via email at mtvogel@icloud.com

All are welcome at Sunday services at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. The Church of the Atonement is located at 17 Quogue Street. 

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.comNews Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

August Update

The shockwaves from the horrific accident on Montauk Highway that claimed five lives almost two weeks ago continue to be felt in the village. At Quaquanantuck joins with everyone in our community in holding good thoughts for the families and survivors of those who lost their lives, and for Brianna Maglio, who was critically injured, and her family. 

For those who would like to help, there is a GoFundMe page (www.gofundme.com/f/help-farhan-zahid-uber-driver-family) dedicated to supporting the family of Farhan Zahid, the Uber driver killed in the crash, who leaves behind a wife and three small children.

Osprey clouds. —A. Botsford Photo

At Quaquanantuck also salutes and holds good thoughts for the officers of the Quogue Village Police, who showed exceptional professionalism and poise in dealing with incredibly challenging and unnerving circumstances at the time of the crash and during the follow up, steady flow of communications, and continuing investigation. The men and women of the department have demonstrated yet again how much they deserve our respect, our appreciation, and our gratitude.


Quogue Firefighters Matt (top) and Tyler Morgan help aspiring volunteers hit their targets.
Visitors to the Quogue Fire Department Open House on August 1 enjoy a ride back to 1960 in an antique fire engine. —Photos courtesy of Kevin Lonnie, Quogue Fire Department

“Celebrate Art!” Party and QHS Art Show & Sale
Tickets are now on sale for the Quogue Historical Society “Celebrate Art!” cocktails and art talk benefit on Friday, August 13, from 5 to 7 p.m. on the Village Green. 

Works by Gabe Smith will be on view at the 55th QHS Art Show & Sale on August 14 on the Village Green.

Speakers for the art talk portion of the “Celebrate Art!” benefit will be Frances Beatty and Stacy Goergen, discussing “Contemporary Art After Covid-19: How the pandemic has impacted the contemporary art market.” Tickets, at $60, or $100 for patrons, are available on the Quogue Historical Society website, www.quoguehistory.org on the Benefit Events page. 

“Cabana” by Margot Carr will be one of the artist’s works in the Art Show & Sale.

Following the “Celebrate Art!” party, of course, the 55th annual Art Show & Sale to benefit the QHS will be held the next day, August 14, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, also on the Quogue Village Green on Jessup Avenue.  

“Kindani,” a collage by Lucinda Morrisey, will be on view at the Art Show & Sale.

The Art Show & Sale, held annually in August since 1975—and the Society’s largest fundraiser based on a percentage of proceeds from sales—is an integral part of the Quogue community’s summer schedule, this year showcasing the work of 25-plus local artists. Suggested donation for browsing is $5. 

“Isle” by Rudy Wilson, one of the artist’s works that will be on view at the Art Show & Sale.

“Moonglow” Author at Wildlife Refuge; Live Birds of Prey August 12
The writer Peggy Dickerson will visit the Quogue Wildlife Refuge for a Meet the Author event on Friday, August 6, at 10 a.m. Ms.Dickerson is the author of “Moonglow,” the beautifully illustrated book that was recently installed at 19 separate stations on the Story Book Walk at the Refuge. 

Author Peggy Dickerson

At the Meet the Author event, Ms. Dickerson will read from her book and sign purchased copies. The program will take place outdoors (under a tent if raining), and is offered in collaboration with the Quogue Library. For more information about the book, visit www.moonglowkids.com.

The Wildlife Refuge, Speonk Lumber and Hampton Coffee have teamed up for a Windows and Wildlife event on Saturday, August 7, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Westhampton Beach Hampton Coffee. For more information, call the QWR at 631-653-4171.

Red-tailed hawk. —Kevin Ferris Photo

On Thursday, August 12, the Refuge is offering an opportunity to meet resident raptors in person at an outdoor Live Birds of Prey social distance program at the Refuge at 3 p.m. During a 45-minute presentation, visitors will learn about native Long Island raptor species—their diets, habitats, and physical adaptations that make them excellent hunters—as well as how to help protect them.

Visitors are requested to bring a blanket to sit on at designated socially distant locations, and to please arrive several minutes ahead to get situated. The fee for this program for adults and families with children age 6 and older is $10 per person, or $5 per child under 10.  Reservations and prepayment required; visit quoguewildliferefuge.org or call 631-653-4771. In case of rain, this will be changed to a virtual Zoom program. 

And be sure the calendar is marked for the one-day “Visions of Nature” art exhibition and social distance reception to benefit the Refuge on Saturday, August 21, from 4 to 6 p.m. 

Area artists will showcase works that represent their visions of nature and wildlife, with a portion of proceeds from sales going to benefit the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. On display will be paintings, photographs, and mixed media works from artists including: Steve Alpert, Jean Arena, Marissa Bridge, Kevin Ferris, Susan Gilbert, John Renner, and Rob Seifert, curated by Elizabeth Anne Hartman of HartmanOnHudson.com and the new Hartman On Hudson pop-up in Westhampton Beach. In the meantime, all are urged to make a donation to the QWR Summer Appeal, a fundraiser established in lieu of the Wild Night for Wildlife benefit. Donations can be made directly on the QWR website, www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, or by clicking on this link, quoguewildliferefuge.org/summerappeal.

Quogue Association Is Quacking Up in Time for Duck Race
Duck sales are underway in preparation for the Quogue Association Duck Race on Friday, August 20, along with the concurrent free QA celebration at the Quogue Village Dock at the end of Quogo Neck. 

World’s coolest duck.

The race begins with the traditional duck drop from the Quogue Bridge at 5 p.m. The party goes from 5 to 7 p.m. with beer, wine and water provided, and music from the band Souled Out. BYO picnic comestibles. This year’s winning duck will be awarded $500; second place prize is $250 and third place wins $150. 

Stefanie Beck and Lynn Lomas on the first day of duck sales in front of the Post Office.

Prices for the cleaned and recycled ducks this year are: one duck, $5; Quack Pack (5 ducks), $20; Ducky Dozen (13), $50; Quack Sack (30), $100; and a Quoggle (100), $300. Ducks will be on sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in front of the Post Office on Saturday, August 7, and Saturday, August 14; from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in front of the Quogue Market on Saturday, August 14, during the QHS Art Show & Sale on the Village Green; at the Quogue Library and at Little Q-Quogue Shop on Jessup Avenue. 

Ducks with racer’s name and phone number may be dropped off at any of these locations, or at the Quogue Bridge before 5 p.m. on August 20.  A reminder to all 2020 members who have not already renewed their membership, and any community members who would like to join the Quogue Association, the process is simple: visit www.quogueassociation.org and click on the “Join/Donate” tab on the upper right of the home page.

Historian David Reynolds Is Next Guest in Author Series at Library
The next installment of the summer Conversations with the Author series at the Quogue Library is scheduled on Sunday, August 8, at 5 p.m. with David S. Reynolds, author of “Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times,” reading from his work and discussing it via Zoom with moderator Andrew Botsford. 

David Reynolds

Poet John Barr, author of “Dante in China” will be the guest on August 15.  The conversation with Alexandra Andrews, author of “Who Is Maud Dixon?” will be live and in-person at the library on August 22.

Patrons can opt to go to the library for the Zoom presentations or view them from the comfort of home; as noted, the August 22 program with Ms. Andrews will be in-person. To find out more about the series, visit the library website and click on any of the Author Series 2021 fliers on the home page. 

The Quogue Photography Exhibit” featuring six artists that opened last week in the Gallery at the Quogue Library will remain on view through August 25.

Featuring photography by Susie Gilbert, Veronique Louis, Lauren Lyons, Peter Moore, Reid + Factor, and Victoria Sartorius, this exhibition aims to highlight the innovative work of local artists. From the serene to the surreal, the work on view brings “a new perspective on the extraordinary beauty in simple, ordinary things,” according to a description from the Art Gallery Committee, and will “challenge viewers to consider what we so often overlook.” Meanwhile, the Quogue Library continues to offer an incredibly wide array of programming for children, teens/tweens, families, and adults of all ages. Getting more information and registering is easy: visit www.quoguelibrary.org and simply click on the flier for any program that catches your interest and a registration link will pop up.

“Give and Take” by Veronique Louis, print on metal, 24 x 36 inches, on view in the “Quogue Photography Exhibit” at the Quogue Library Art Gallery.

Reception for “Clementine: Selfless in a Selfie World” at Quogue Gallery
“Clementine: Selfless in a Selfie World” is the title of the new exhibition at the Quogue Gallery at 44 Quogue Street. Featuring 15 works newly created by the artist, the exhibition will run from August 5 to August 25, with an artist reception scheduled on Saturday, August 7, from 5 to 7 p.m. 

Clementine employs the “art filter” technique that she developed in her new “Selfless” series. The series reflects her journeys to remote villages in third world nations to give hidden stories and humanitarian challenges a voice through her art. Through photography, she captures encounters with disabled school children, orphans facing life threatening events, or those simply in need of basic human essentials such as access to clean water. 

Clementine, “Too Hot to Handle,” 2021, Acrylic on Plexiglass Art Filter over Acrylic on canvas, 36 x 36. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

Melding photography into paintings on canvas, Clementine overlays an art filter that is representative of our social media obsessed society. The resulting message, according to a release from the gallery, is: “Look beyond the self and at others in the world who truly need our attention.” 

“Selfless in a Selfie World” is a series created by the artist “to raise the consciousness of society, embracing what it means to move beyond narcissism and towards human connection.”

The cast of the QJTT production of “Frozen Jr.” is getting ready for their August 24 to 27 run at the Quogue Community Hall. Final two performances of the older cast production of “Pippin” are tonight and tomorrow, August 5 and 6. Visit http://www.qjttonline.org for information. —Caroline Jane Logler Photo

Write America Special Event on August 5 Celebrates Rita Dove
Write America: A Reading for Our Country, the Monday night series of readings and stimulating discussions on the Crowdcast channel hosted by the independent bookstore Book Revue, will offer a special event tonight, Thursday, August 5, at 7 p.m.: “Celebrating Rita Dove.” The program will feature the celebrated poet in conversation with series creator Roger Rosenblatt.

Rita Dove

The regular Monday evening schedule resumes on August 9 with memoirist and novelist Kaylie Jones and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Vijay Seshadri; on August 16 the guest authors will be award-winning novelist Ursula Hegi and author and editor Vanessa Cuti

Write America runs weekly, every Monday at 7 p.m. EST on Book Revue’s Crowdcast channel. All events are free; registration is required at bookrevue.com/write-america-series. A selection of signed titles will be available for purchase with each Write America episode; Book Revue ships worldwide. For more information, click here or visit bookrevue.com/write-america-series.

“Swan Song” Up Next in PAC Film Series
Larry Maslon, creator and host of the award-winning “From Broadway to Main Street” radio program on WLIU 88.3 FM and the writer and co-producer of the American Masters documentary, “Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me,”   among many other accomplishments, will join Andrew Botsford to offer film commentary on the Tuesday, August 10, screening of “Swan Song,” written and directed by Todd Stephens, as part of the 2021 World Cinema summer series at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center. 

Udo Kier in “Swan Song.”

As one critic wrote, “‘Swan Song’ … proves that fabulousness has no expiration date.” Another reviewer calls the film “beautiful, smart, irreverent and really f*cking funny. Simply put, it’s divine.”

On August 17, the PAC will screen the Chilean film “Ema,” directed by Pablo Larrain, who shares a co-writer credit. 

“Ema” has been described by one critic as “Brilliantly acted, shot with precision and style, this is a deconstruction of the ‘nuclear family’ that cries out for a second or third viewing.”

Films in the summer series are screened on Tuesday and Wednesday at 7:30, with commentary on Tuesday evenings only. A complete list of this summer’s films, with trailers, is available on the PAC website, www.whbpac.org. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit whbpac.org and click on Films

Foreign Policy Association Looks at “China and Africa”
The next installment of this year’s Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program will examine the roiling economic and political issues between China and Africa. Pending any changes based on new guidance, the program will be hosted virtually by the Quogue Library and presented by moderator David Rowe and facilitator Susan Perkins on Saturday, August 14, from 5 to 6 p.m.  

To sign up for the August 14 virtual program, visit www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the FPA Great Decisions “China and Africa” flier on the home page. 

Summer Services at Church of the Atonement
The Reverend Dr. Robert Dannals, now in his 19th season at the Church of the Atonement, will officiate for the last time at the church this summer at the 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. services on Sunday, August 8.

On Sunday, August 15, and Sunday, August 22, The Reverend Zachary Thompson will officiate at the Church of the Atonement services. 

Rev. Thompson is the Vicar at St. James’ Church in Manhattan. Prior to St. James’, he served as Rector and Associate Priest at the Church of Our Saviour in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as Chaplain at Emory University. Originally from Princeton, New Jersey, he earned his Master of Divinity at Emory University and a Master of Sacred Theology at Sewanee: The University of the South. 

Rev. Thompson’s wife, Amy, is the Director of Admissions at the Church of the Epiphany Day School. They have seven and nine year-old sons, Ezra and Rowan.

Following the traditional schedule, Communion is offered every week at the 8 a.m. service and Morning Prayer at 10 a.m.; on the first Sunday of the month, Communion is offered at both services. 

Masks are required at services, according to a notification from the church, “until we are sure it is safe for everyone.” All children in the community, age 7 to 14, are invited to sing in the junior choir, which is led by Patricia Osborne Feiler, organist and choir director. Rehearsals are held at 9 a.m. on Sunday mornings. For additional information regarding the junior choir, contact Mary Vogel via email at mtvogel@icloud.com

All are welcome at Sunday services at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. The Church of the Atonement is located at 17 Quogue Street.

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

In the Swim

Comparing the abundance of programming this summer with what was on offer during the Covid summer of 2020 makes At Quaquanantuck think of a race car accelerating from zero to 85 in about three seconds. It’s a little disorienting. 

Perhaps that’s why—with live programs returning and summer just getting really underway a couple of weeks ago—it seems impossible that the Quogue Fire Department Open House is coming up in one week, and the Quogue Historical Society Art Show & Sale the week after. 

Sunset sentinels. —A. Botsford Photo

As readers have undoubtedly noticed, the abundance of programming and all manner of events and activities, coupled with At Quaquanantuck’s now monthly (ish) schedule, have resulted in this column getting almost impossibly long. It now requires a real commitment of time to digest it all; anyone trying to read it on their phone in one sitting runs the risk of having their battery die. You have my apologies.

And yet, it is so gratifying to at long last have so much to share as the community comes back to life. So, please, get a calendar to mark up and settle in: there’s a lot going on that you won’t want to miss. 

Youngsters step up to examine a fire truck at a previous QFD Open House. —Photo courtesy of Quogue Fire Department

Fire Department Brings Back the Open House
As the volunteers made it clear on a postcard announcing the event, the Quogue Fire Department wants to do its part in the return to normalcy by “reinstating our annual open house on August 1” from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Firehouse. 

There will be a few changes “to reflect the times and the CDC protocols in effect on that date.” Plans call for emphasizing demonstrations of what the volunteer firefighters do as part of their responsibilities. All activities will be outside, with food and beverages provided “within the guidelines.” And, yes, there will be fire truck rides. 

Everyone wants a chance to try their hand at hitting a target with a fire hose. —Photo courtesy of Quogue Fire Department

Following the festivities at the Firehouse, there will be a live performance by the band UrbanAcoustic at 6 p.m. on the Quogue Village Green on Jessup Avenue. 

Come one, come all, and get your Open House on!

Get Ready to “Celebrate Art!” and Visit the QHS Art Show & Sale
While we’re on the topic of beloved summer traditions that we’re all happy to see coming back, make sure to mark the calendar for the Quogue Historical Society “Celebrate Art!” cocktails and art talk benefit on Friday, August 13, from 5 to 7 p.m. on the Village Green, and the 55th annual Art Show & Sale to benefit the QHS the next day, August 14, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, also on the Quogue Village Green on Jessup Avenue.  

Speakers for the art talk portion of the “Celebrate Art!” benefit will be Frances Beatty and Stacy Goergen, discussing “Contemporary Art After Covid-19: How the pandemic has impacted the contemporary art market.” For more information about the Friday benefit and the Saturday Art Show & Sale, visit https://quoguehistory.org.

Photo of the first exhibition at the “Old Schoolhouse Museum” in 1949. —Photo courtesy of the Quogue Historical Society

A Historical Society celebration of a different kind is now going on at the Society’s 1822 Schoolhouse Museum on the grounds of the Quogue Library. The Schoolhouse Museum currently features an exhibit looking back at the very first exhibition in the building that Abram Post salvaged in the early 1900s and the Post family donated to the library in 1948 to be operated as a museum.  

On August 24, 1949, the Quogue Library’s newly formed Historical Committee, forerunner of the Quogue Historical Society, opened its first exhibition, which featured “furniture, implements, photographs, and documents, many of them dating back to the early settlers in Quogue.”

Self-guided tours of “Quogue’s ‘Old Schoolhouse Museum’: The First Exhibition, 1949” are open to the public from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Tuesday (closed Wednesday).  

Historical Society members were reminded at the beginning of this month to renew memberships for the coming year to support the Society’s “ongoing work to collect, preserve, and interpret the rich history of our charming Village.” Annual memberships provide critical financial support and also serve as assurance of members’ interest in preserving Quogue’s past for future generations.

All those who are not already members, are asked to please consider joining, as membership contributions are the single largest source of income for the Society. Renewing or taking out a new membership can be done online at www.quoguehistory.org. All donations are fully tax-deductible. For more information, email info@quoguehistory.org or call 631-996-9490.

Quogue Association Is Feeling Just Ducky: Watch the Pond to See Why
Fresh from the success of the Association’s Beach Party on July 17, members of the Quogue Association have a surprise in store tomorrow, July 23, for Quogue Pond visitors and passersby.

As Stefanie Beck disclosed in a scoop for At Quaquanantuck this week: “On Friday, July 23, the coolest Duck yet will make its appearance in the Quogue Pond for three weeks only! The visiting duck will herald the return of the Duck Race on August 20, with sales of ducks on only three Saturdays: on July 31, August 7 and August 14 in front of the post office from 9 a.m. to noon.”

Resuming this summer without missing a beat, the annual Duck Race on Friday, August 20, and free attendant celebration at the Quogue Village Dock run from 5 to 7 p.m., with beer, wine and water provided, and music from the band Souled Out. Picnicking is encouraged, so be prepared to BYO munchies and chow down. This year’s winning duck will be awarded $500; second place prize is $250 and third place wins $150. 

Prices for the cleaned and recycled ducks this year are: one duck, $5; Quack Pack (5 ducks), $20; Ducky Dozen (13), $50; Quack Sack (30), $100; and a Quoggie (100), $300. 

Ms. Beck was also kind enough to share a report on last Saturday’s beach party, calling it “a huge success with over 250 people.” Beer was supplied by the local Westhampton Beach Brewing Company, earning “lots of compliments,” she said, noting that the same brewery will be supplying the beer for the Duck Race celebration. “The DJ played  great music and a good time was had by all.”  

A reminder to all 2020 members who have not already renewed their membership, and any community members who would like to join the Quogue Association, the process is simple: visit www.quogueassociation.org and click on the “Join/Donate” tab on the upper right of the home page.


Members of the older cast of the Quogue Junior Theater Troupe rehearsing some musical magic from “Pippen,” running August 3 through 6 at the Quogue Community Hall. The QJTT Summer Benefit is scheduled this year on Friday, July 30, with a performance at 7 p.m. at the theater followed by a cocktail reception at the Quogue Field Club at 8 p.m. Visit the qjttonline.org website for more information. —Jeff Prior Photo

More In-Person Programs at Wildlife Refuge;  “Moonglow” Graces Story Book Walk
Step by responsibly cautious step, the folks at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge are bringing back more socially distanced in-person programs. 

For one example, in collaboration with the Quogue Library, a new story has been placed in the Story Book Walk at the Refuge. The children’s book “Moonglow” by author Peggy Dickerson is about a magical moonlit night in a forest where animals are transformed by the moonbeams. Visitors can start at the beginning of the green trail to find the first page of the book, and follow the arrows around to 19 separate installments. 

According to Refuge Associate Director Marisa Nelson, “A Story Book Walk, for folks who aren’t familiar, is a fun, educational activity that places the pages from a children’s story along a trail. The walk is designed to help children at all reading levels to enjoy the outdoors and read a book with their family and friends.” This activity is available to be enjoyed daily from sunrise to sunset this summer; a new book will be installed in the fall. 

The Refuge is offering an opportunity to meet “Moonglow” author Peggy Dickerson and purchase the beautifully illustrated book at a Meet the Author social distance event on Friday, August 6, at 10 a.m. 

As pretty much everyone knows, “On a moonlit night in the forest, magical things can happen….” At the Meet the Author event, Ms. Dickerson will read from her book and sign purchased copies. The program will take place outdoors (under a tent if raining), and is offered in collaboration with the Quogue Library. For more information about the book, visit www.moonglowkids.com.

On Thursday, August 12, the Refuge is offering an opportunity to meet resident raptors in person at an outdoor Live Birds of Prey social distance program at the Refuge at 3 p.m. During a 45-minute presentation, visitors will learn about native Long Island raptor species—their diets, habitats, and physical adaptations that make them excellent hunters—as well as how to help protect them.

This magnificent great horned owl is one of the resident raptors at the QWR. —Kevin Ferris Photo

Visitors are requested to bring a blanket to sit on at designated socially distant locations, and to please arrive several minutes ahead to get situated. The fee for this program for adults and families with children age 6 and older is $10 per person, or $5 per child under 10.  Reservations and prepayment required; visit quoguewildliferefuge.org or call 631-653-4771. In case of rain, this will be changed to a virtual Zoom program. 

And mark the calendar now for the “Visions of Nature” art exhibition and social distance reception to benefit the Refuge on Saturday, August 21, from 4 to 6 p.m. 

“Pastel Seascape” by Susan Gilbert is one of the works that will be on view in the “Visions of Nature” exhibition at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge.

Area artists will showcase works that represent their visions of nature and wildlife, with a portion of proceeds from sales going to benefit the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. On display will be paintings, photographs, and mixed media works from artists including: Steve Alpert, Jean Arena, Marissa Bridge, Kevin Ferris, Susan Gilbert, John Renner, and Rob Seifert, curated by Elizabeth Anne Hartman of HartmanOnHudson.com and the new Hartman On Hudson gallery in Westhampton Beach. 

In the meantime, all are urged to make a donation to the QWR Summer Appeal, a fundraiser established in lieu of the Wild Night for Wildlife benefit. Donations can be made directly on the QWR website, www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, or by clicking on this link, quoguewildliferefuge.org/summerappeal.

Black crowned night heron stalks a daytime meal . —Florrie Morrisey Photo

This Week’s Message from “Go Native”: Make a Correction
Way back at the beginning of the environmental movement in the ’60s and ’70s, the directive to “Think globally, act locally” arrived with a whiff of crunchy granola and Birkenstocks and was often sneered at and dismissed as out of touch. 

Today, though, with fires and floods and superstorms taking their deadly toll all over the planet, the phrase has taken on an inescapable urgency, and it’s more important than ever to take whatever steps we can locally as we wait and pray for governments to act globally. 

For this edition of At Quaquanantuck, Lulie Morrisey and Paula Prentis, self-described “co-motivators-in-chief” of the Go Native initiative in Quogue, are asking residents to consider what kind of actions they can take in their own backyards.  

As Ms. Morrisey wrote this week: “‘Save the birds’ … ‘Save the bees’ … these slogans can make one feel powerless in the face of the overwhelming forces arrayed against our natural planet. But the power of one—You!—should not be underestimated. You don’t have to feel helpless, or that you can’t make all the changes to your landscape that you’ve heard recommended: just make a correction.

“Make one or two changes and you’re off to a great start. No need to rip out hydrangeas, just add a few natives (especially pollinators). 

“One of the most important changes you can make is to eliminate the use of poisons on your property (otherwise known as pesticides and herbicides). 

“Often these chemicals work in the opposite way than intended. Rodenticides cause internal bleeding in voles. This makes them thirsty and they tend to crawl out of their holes and stagger around looking for water. This makes them easy prey for hawks and owls who, after eating a few, will also die from internal hemorrhaging. Yes, this is gruesome, but this is the full circle that we all need to be aware of when we make these choices.

“Similarly, using pesticides to get rid of bugs ends up starving both adult birds and their babies. Baby birds need protein and bugs are the main source of that: especially fat caterpillars! A few holes in your leaves is actually a sign of a healthy, functioning ecosystem. 

“We’ve lost an astounding one third of all the birds in North America in the last 40 years—3 billion in all. This is devastating for the health of our planet. Just keep thinking how your actions play out in the bigger picture. And make a correction.”

Instead of trying to croon his tune, this mockingbird, left, opted to mock/mimic the body language of this high wire willet.
—Florrie Morrisey Photo

New Art Exhibit, Author Conversations, and Plethora of Programs at Library
The Gallery at the Quogue Library will present “The Quogue Photography Exhibit” from July 31 through August 25, with an Artists’ Reception open to all on Saturday, July 31, from 4 to 5:30 p.m.

Featuring photography by Susie Gilbert, Veronique Louis, Lauren Lyons, Peter Moore, Reid + Factor, and Victoria Sartorius, this exhibition aims to highlight the innovative work of local artists. From the serene to the surreal, the work on view will bring “a new perspective on the extraordinary beauty in simple, ordinary things,” according to a description from the Art Gallery Committee, and will “challenge viewers to consider what we so often overlook.” 

“Fury,” a 24 x 36-inch print on metal by Veronique Louis, will be one of the works on view in “The Quogue Photography Exhibit” opening at the Quogue Library Art Gallery on Saturday, July 31. —Photo courtesy of the artist

The next installment of the summer Conversations with the Author series at the Quogue Library is scheduled on Sunday, July 25, at 5 p.m. with Karin Tanabe, author of “A Woman of Intelligence,” reading from her work and discussing it via Zoom with moderator Andrew Botsford.

David S. Reynolds, author of “Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times,” will be the guest author on August 8, and poet John Barr, author of “Dante in China” on August 15.  The conversation with Alexandra Andrews, author of “Who Is Maud Dixon?” will be live and in-person at the library on August 22.

Patrons can opt to go to the library for the Zoom presentations or view them from the comfort of home; the August 22 program with Ms. Andrews will be in-person. To find out more about the series, visit the library website and click on any of the Author Series 2021 fliers on the home page. 

The Quogue Library continues to offer an incredibly wide array of programming for children, teens/tweens, families, and adults of all ages. Getting more information and registering is easy: simply click on the flier for any program that catches your interest and a registration link will pop up. 

Write America Brings Far-Flung Authors to Your Home
Speaking of conversations with authors, remember that Write America: A Reading for Our Country, the brainchild of Quogue author and playwright Roger Rosenblatt, continues to offer beautiful readings and stimulating discussions aimed at mending some of the rifts roiling our nation on Monday evenings at 7 p.m. on the Crowdcast channel hosted by Book Revue, the wonderful, community minded gem of an independent bookstore located in Huntington.

Roger Rosenblatt

Even as in-person programs resume, the virtual Write America series continues to put together writers in far-flung locations for engaging discussions that can be accessed by anyone around the world, live in real time or in a recorded version.   

Coming up on Monday, July 26, will be novelist and journalist Joyce Maynard and poet and essayist Adrienne Unger. On Thursday, August 5, at 7 p.m. the series will offer a special event, “Celebrating Rita Dove,” with the poet in conversation with series creator Roger Rosenblatt. The regular Monday evening schedule resumes on August 9 with memoirist and novelist Kaylie Jones and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Vijay Seshadri; on August 16 the guest authors will be award-winning novelist Ursula Hegi and author and editor Vanessa Cuti

Write America runs weekly, every Monday at 7 p.m. EST on Book Revue’s Crowdcast channel. All events are free; registration is required at bookrevue.com/write-america-series. A selection of signed titles will be available for purchase with each Write America episode; Book Revue ships worldwide. For more information, click here or visit bookrevue.com/write-america-series.

“Three Women: Three Visions” Opening July 31
“Three Women: Three Visions,” an art exhibit featuring the works of Claudia Baez, Ellen Ball and Leslie Singer, will be on view from July 31 to September 7 at the new Hartman On Hudson space at 8 Moniebogue Lane in Westhampton Beach, with an Artists Reception scheduled on Saturday, July 31, from 5 to 7 p.m. 

“Three Women: Three Visions” offers “the evocative visions of three talented artists who employ disparate media to create their moody and dramatic works,” according to a release from gallerist Elizabeth Anne Hartman. 

Santa Fe based painter Leslie Singer’s new series, “Gotham Gals,” takes its cues from the audacious Art Deco era painter Tamara de Lempicka, who painted the beau monde exuding elegance and attitude. 

Claudia Baez, “Last Year at Marienbad: Someone’s Coming,” 2018, oil, charcoal and oil stick on canvas, 21 x 27 inches, is one of the works that will be on view in “Three Women: Three Visions,” opening July 31 at Hartman On Hudson in Westhampton Beach. —Image courtesy of Hartman On Hudson

In 2017, Quogue and New York artist Claudia Doring Baez was overcome with teenage memories of going with her family to their neighborhood arts cinema in Mexico City, where she was raised. One film in particular eclipsed the others: French director Alain Resnais’s 1961 enigmatic film “Last Year at Marienbad,” a seminal work of the French New Wave. Using film stills as inspiration, Baez’s oil, charcoal and oil stick paintings on canvas invite the viewer into her private bold and stylized vision of this influential film.

Ellen Ball’s large scale works on Belgian linen feature iconic forms distilled to their abstract minimal shapes, lines and contours, or photographic simplicity. By combining elaborate patterns, she creates wholly original compositions and artworks. Working with found or appropriated imagery, Ball photoshops, cuts, collages, layers, or draws on metal leaf, creating new compositions that are then transferred onto canvas. This process leaves behind black ink and reveals a natural degradation. Provident imperfections occur and new shapes and textures present themselves.

Barbara Ernst Prey through August 4; Clementine Up Next at Quogue Gallery
“Barbara Ernst Prey: Vanishing Point” remains on view until August 4 at the Quogue Gallery at 44 Quogue Street. 

Barbara Ernst Prey, “Early Morning Beach Day,” 2021, oil on canvas, 12 x 16 inches. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

The Barbara Ernst Prey exhibition features 20 works in various mediums—watercolor on paper, oil on panel and canvas and digital print—reflecting the widely acclaimed artist’s Long Island roots. Three paintings of Quogue scenes are included in the show. 

Coming up next at the Quogue Gallery will be “Clementine: Selfless in a Selfie World.” Featuring 15 works newly created by the artist, the exhibition will run from August 5 to August 25, with an artist reception scheduled on Saturday, August 7, from 5 to 7 p.m. 

Speaking about her “art filter” body of work, the artist has said: “I am intrigued by how I can reflect our social media era in a fine art form. This series is comprised of interchangeable art filters that overlay paintings, instantly transforming them, just as with digital filters in platforms such as Instagram. Filter paintings represent social media symbols, such as the conspicuous selfie pucker.” 

Clementine, “#Retro,” 2021, acrylic on Plexiglass “Art Filter” over acrylic on canvas, 24 x 24 inches. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

Clementine employs her “art filter” technique in her new “Selfless” series. The series reflects her journeys to remote villages in third world nations to give hidden stories and humanitarian challenges a voice through her art. Through photography, she captures encounters with disabled school children, orphans facing life threatening events, or those simply in need of basic human essentials such as access to clean water. Melding photography into paintings on canvas, Clementine overlays an art filter that is representative of our social media obsessed society. The resulting message, according to a release from the gallery, is: “Look beyond the self and at others in the world who truly need our attention.” 

“Selfless in a Selfie World” is a series created by the artist “to raise the consciousness of society, embracing what it means to move beyond narcissism and towards human connection.”

Clementine is an international artist with an exhibition history spanning Milan, Amsterdam, Brussels, Miami, and New York. She works across series painting primarily in acrylic on canvas and plexiglass. Her paintings range from purely abstract to figurative in style, all with an underlying freedom of expression depicted through bold color palettes and symbolic messages. Clementine received a B.A. from Boston College with additional art studies at Parsons and Harvard.

PAC Film Series Welcomes Billy Collins
Former two-time U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins will join Andrew Botsford to offer film commentary on the Tuesday, July 27, screening of the French film “Mandibles,” directed by Quentin Dupieux, as part of the 2021 Rose and Don Ciampa World Cinema summer series at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center. 

A giant fly discovered in the trunk of a stolen car sparks the action in “Mandibles.”

Films in the summer series are screened on Tuesday and Wednesday at 7:30, with Andrew Botsford of Quogue introducing the films on Tuesday evenings and discussing them afterward, often with guest commentators, followed by an informal audience discussion. A complete list of this summer’s films, with trailers, is available on the PAC website. For more information about PAC protocols and to purchase tickets, visit whbpac.org and click on Films

Following “Mandibles” the lineup continues with “Summertime” on August 3 and 4; “Swan Song” on August 10 and 11; and “Ema” on August 17 and 18.

Foreign Policy Association Looks at “China and Africa”
The next installment of this year’s Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program will examine some of the growing economic and political issues between China and Africa. Pending any changes based on new guidance, the program will be hosted virtually by the Quogue Library and presented by moderator David Rowe and facilitator Susan Perkins on Saturday, August 14, from 5 to 6 p.m.  

The Covid-19 crisis has put a massive strain on what was originally a positive economic and political relationship between China and the continent of Africa. As Chinese President Xi Jinping’s centerpiece “Belt and Road initiative” continues to expand Chinese power, the response to the spread of Covid-19, as well as the African governments’ growing debt to China, has seen pushback. 

The Great Decisions discussion series, America’s largest program on world affairs, involves reading the Great Decisions briefing book and meeting in a Discussion Group to watch a DVD and discuss the most critical global issues facing America today. To sign up for the July 17 virtual program, click here or visit www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the FPA Great Decisions “China and Africa” flier on the home page.

Summer Services at Church of the Atonement
The Reverend Dr. Robert Dannals, now in his 19th season at the Church of the Atonement, will continue to officiate at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday services through Sunday, August 8.

Following the traditional schedule, Communion is offered every week at the 8 a.m. service and Morning Prayer at 10 a.m.; on the first Sunday of the month, Communion is offered at both services. 

The Rev. Zachary Thompson

Rev. Dannals, who has been serving as a part-time Associate at St. John’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida, was recently appointed as the Interim Rector for the Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea in Palm Beach, Florida, for the coming year. 

He earned his Masters of Divinity from Virginia Theological Seminary, a Doctor of Ministry from Drew University and a Ph.D. from Graduate Theological. For more than 12 years he has been writing lectionary-based daily e-devotions. 

The Reverend Zachary Thompson will officiate at the Church of the Atonement for two Sundays, August 15 and 22. 

Rev. Thompson is the Vicar at St. James’ Church in Manhattan. Prior to St. James’, he served as Rector and Associate Priest at the Church of Our Saviour in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as Chaplain at Emory University. Originally from Princeton, New Jersey, he earned his Master of Divinity at Emory University and a Master of Sacred Theology at Sewanee: The University of the South. 

Rev. Thompson’s wife, Amy, is the Director of Admissions at the Church of the Epiphany Day School. They have seven and nine year-old sons, Ezra and Rowan.

Masks are required at services, according to a notification from the church, “until we are sure it is safe for everyone.” All children in the community, age 7 to 14, are invited to sing in the junior choir, which is led by Patricia Osborne Feiler, organist and choir director. Rehearsals are held at 9 a.m. on Sunday mornings. For additional information regarding the junior choir, contact Mary Vogel via email at mtvogel@icloud.com

Sunday services are at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.; all are welcome. The Church of the Atonement is located at 17 Quogue Street. 

Remembering Two Stalwart Quogue Residents
Over the last two weeks, our village lost two larger than life characters who loved Quogue dearly. In this week’s column, At Quaquanantuck and those who knew them best remember Frances (Frankie) Ryan and Tom Lawson.

Frances (Frankie) Ryan
Survived by her son Robert Ryan of New York City and her longtime companion Richmond (Dick) Gardner of Quogue, Frances (Frankie) Mead Ryan died peacefully at home in Quogue on July 8 due to heart failure. She was 87.

Born in New York City, she graduated from St. Lawrence University in 1955 and went to work at Met Life Insurance, remaining there until 1963. After changing careers to early childhood education, she moved to Long Island in 1968 and taught at the East Quogue Elementary School, mostly in the first and second grades, until her retirement in 2000.

Frances (Frankie) Ryan

Mrs. Ryan was known as a patient and supportive teacher with a passion for books, gardening and history. 

“A 50-plus year resident of Quogue, the Village was always high in her thoughts,” Dick Gardner wrote in an email this week. “Among her civic interests were the Library, where she spent many Saturday mornings as a volunteer at the circulation desk; the Quogue Historical Society, where she succeeded Pat Shuttleworth as the expert on the histories of Quogue houses and will be remembered for her annual presentations; her service as Village Historian; the Church of the Atonement, where she was a member of the Altar Guild and a Eucharistic Minister; and the Westhampton Garden Club, as an enthusiastic participant in all the club’s activities.” 

Her friend Cecelia Lazarescu wrote this week that “in addition to her love of the history of Quogue, Frankie was so very proud of her garden. Years ago, when I first met her, she invited me over to see all of the beautiful things she had planted. At that time I knew nothing about gardening and she seemed to know everything and was willing to share with a novice.”

In addition to her membership at the Quogue Beach Club, the Surf Club, the Quogue Club, and the Daughters of the American Revolution; she was also a trustee of the Suffolk County Historical Society. 

A funeral was held on July 18 at the Church of the Atonement, and Mrs. Ryan will be interred at the Quogue Cemetery. Memorial donations in her name may be made to the Church of the Atonement.

Tom Lawson
Thomas Elsworth Lawson of Quogue, and formerly of Manhattan and Wellesley, Massachusetts, died on June 29. He was 84.

As detailed in an obituary in The Southampton Press, Tom’s Odyssean career began in the golden age of New York advertising and spanned 50 years, with leadership positions at Ogilvy & Mather, McCann-Erickson, and Arnold Worldwide. 

In 1971, he joined Ron Rosenfeld and Len Sirowitz to form Rosenfeld, Sirowitz & Lawson (RS&L), which  would become one of the most talked about and dynamic agencies in New York over the next 15 years, and was named the hottest medium-size shop of the year in 1979. 

A Harvard graduate, he played varsity football there and received the William Paine LaCroix Award for sportsmanship, loyalty, and team spirit. After college, he continued to play tennis, golf, softball, and volleyball as often as he could. He also served in the U.S. Army as a first lieutenant, earning his Parachutist Badge. In his later life, McDonald’s, a major client, presented him with its Lifetime Achievement Award.

Around our village, his dashing good looks combined with his sartorial choices made it appear that he had walked out of the pages of an elegant menswear catalog, and qualified him for best-dressed honors in any context, be it the boardroom or the backyard. Whether greeting a longtime friend or a new acquaintance, his ever-present ebullient bonhomie and love of laughter almost seemed a challenge to anyone he encountered to be in as good a mood as he was. 

As the Press obituary noted: “His hospitality was legend: if you showed up on his doorstep—whether you were from overseas or zip code 11959—you were welcomed with drinks, toasted at dinner, and offered a roof over your head for as long as you needed.”

His friend David Campagna wrote in an email this week: “Tom was a special guy. Some of his attributes that come to mind are: humorous; intelligent; ethical; unpretentious; respected boss and businessman; courageous; a loyal and valued friend; loving husband, father, and grandfather; and generous patriarch of his extended family. It was a privilege to know him; He will be sorely missed by many.”

Another longtime friend, Tom Elliott, wrote in an email: “Tom was a man who exuded optimism every day, had a keen sense of humor, left a huge footprint in the advertising world, had a love of all sports, both as a fan and as an avid competitor, and above all an endless love of his family. He will be missed by all of us who had the privilege of knowing him.” 

He is survived by his wife, Nina, the love of his life for more than 40 years; his children, Patric (Sarah) of Norwell Massachusetts, James (Caroline Flynn) of Park Slope, and Samantha (Matthew Termine) of Park Slope; grandchildren, Maeve, Cordner, Matilda, Theo, and Oliver; siblings, Captain Peter (Rosine) of San Ramon, California, Judy Clarke of Rockland, Massachusetts, and Christopher (Dianne) of Hanover, Massachusetts; and many nieces and nephews. 

A celebration of Tom’s life is scheduled for autumn 2021, date to be determined. Donations may be made in Tom’s name to the Alzheimer’s Association at www.alz.org.

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Proof of Life

Ah, summer. Although its progress can be measured with holidays—launches Memorial Day weekend; achieves orbit July 4; splashes down on Labor Day—it’s also a subjective thing. 

Some tie it to the progress of plant life—rhododendrons, peonies, iris, roses and dahlias—or crops for the table: asparagus, strawberries, corn and tomatoes. Some gauge it from activities: first and last day at the beach or swim in the ocean; launching the boat and pulling it out; first and last fishing trip; rounds of golf played in shorts. 

Summer calm. —A. Botsford Photo

Augmenting whatever hallmarks we might use to identify and embrace this wondrous season, there are events and traditions. Summer of 2020 was perhaps most notable for its lack of these. With no (or only a virtual facsimile of) Memorial Day services; graduation ceremonies; HTC play, Chamber Music concert, or Quogue Junior Theater Troupe shows at the Community Hall; gala fundraisers for important non-profits—including most especially the Wild Night for Wildlife to benefit the Wildlife Refuge or the Quogue Historical Society Art Show and Sale—and no Quogue Association Beach Party or Duck Race, to name only a few of the missing, it was open to question if we really had a summer at all. 

Well, of course we did, but it was certainly nothing like the kind of summer we have so happily become accustomed to sharing with family and friends. That’s why we should be even more appreciative this year of all the organizations that are doing whatever it takes to bring back, safely, the events and activities that give this season its beautiful texture. At the same time, we must be even more supportive of those, like the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, that are precluded for a second summer from hosting both a wonderful party and their most important fundraiser of the year. 

Quogue Association Checking All the Boxes
Perhaps the group most often associated with setting out the goal posts for this community’s celebration of summer, the Quogue Association is going full bore again this year, scheduling the big Beach Party on July 17 at the Village Beach; setting up for the Duck Race and free concert at the Village Dock on August 20, and awarding, as it does every year, the QA’s annual scholarship to a community service minded student from Quogue.

The QA blockbuster Village Beach Party on Saturday, July 17 (rain date July 24), from 6 to 9 p.m. is one of those rare events that can actually live up to the promise of “fun for the whole family.” The tasty menu includes hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken tenders and assorted salads, with a beverage selection of wine, beer and lemonade. 

DJ Mike Variale of East End Entertainment will be set up down on the beach this year, closer to the action around the traditional bonfire, and free Quogue Association frisbees will be distributed to all the kids. The price is $30 for adults and young persons age 11 and up; $15 for kids 5 to 10; and free for children under 5. 

Residents may still be shaking the sand out of their pockets on July 31, the first of three Saturdays when the QA will be set up outside the Post Office to sell cleaned up, restored and recycled ducks for the annual Duck Race on Friday, August 20, to benefit the Quogue Association’s community projects. The race and free attendant celebration and concert at the Quogue Village Dock run from 5 to 7 p.m., with beer, wine and water provided, and music from the band Souled Out. Picnicking is encouraged, so be prepared to BYO comestibles and tuck in. More details on duck prices, sale dates, and prizes for winners in the next At Quaquanantuck. 

Quogue Association President Lynn Lomas has announced that Arielle Bolduc is this year’s recipient of the annual scholarship awarded annually by the QA to a graduating student of Westhampton Beach High School who currently lives in Quogue and has demonstrated a significant commitment to community service. 

Arielle’s accomplishments include volunteering at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge as a camp counselor, helping to prepare meals for needy families during the holidays, volunteering at Southampton Animal Shelter, and participating in beach cleanups along Dune Road. She is looking forward to attending Louisiana State University in the fall. Congratulations, Arielle!

Members of the Quogue Association board of directors (left to right) Mac Highet, Stefanie Beck, Lynn Lomas and Kevin Crowe with this year’s QA scholarship recipient Arielle Bolduc.

To paraphrase the important message passed on by Mayor Peter Sartorius in his most recent email to village residents, dated June 21: Any resident who is not already supporting the Quogue Association by being a member (for the modest sum of $40 per year plus any additional voluntary contribution), should consider becoming a member. And all members on the QA rolls for 2020 who have not already done so are urged to renew their membership as soon as possible. The process is simple: visit www.quogueassociation.org and click on the “Join/Donate” tab on the upper right of the home page. As Hizzoner pointed out, “If you are technologically challenged or just prefer the traditional means of making payments, send your name and email address with your check to the Quogue Association at PO Box 671 in Quogue.”

In addition to the Beach Party, the Duck Race and free concert, the annual scholarship, guest speaker series, monthly newsletter to members, and many other contributions to enhancing the quality of life in our village, the Quogue Association maintains the landscaping at the Village Dock, at the west entrance to Quogue from Montauk Highway, at the Post Lane circle, and at the intersection of Post Lane and Dune Road. Recent projects that the QA fully or partially funded include the restoration of the Nachum Chapin anchor at the Quogue Library, replacement of the Village Clock at the Village Pond, installation of the beautiful serpentine bench on the Village Green, and placement of a resting bench at the intersection of Old Depot and Scrub Oak Roads. 

It all boils down to this: there’s every reason to become a member or renew your membership in the Quogue Association, and not a single reason not to. 

Quogo Neck sunset. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Incumbent Trustees Win Another Two-Year Term
In this year’s Quogue Village election on Friday, June 18, more than 100 voters turned out in support of the status quo, awarding incumbents Randy Cardo and Ted Necarsulmer (who were running unopposed) additional two-year terms as Trustees. 

Deborah Disston Wins Election to School Board
Quogue School Superintendent Jeffrey Ryvicker was kind enough to share the results of the run-off election for a member of the Quogue School Board of Education: “At a Special Run-Off Election held on June 22, Ms. Deborah Disston was elected to the Quogue UFSD Board of Education,” Mr. Ryvicker wrote in an email this week. “Ms. Disston ran unopposed, as Holly Degnan withdrew her candidacy prior to the election. Ms. Disston will serve as Trustee for a term of three years.”

The Quogue Historical Society’s 1822 One-Room Schoolhouse Museum is now open for self-guided tours six days a week. —Photo courtesy of Quogue Historical Society

1822 One-Room Schoolhouse Is Now Open
The Quogue Historical Society has announced that the newly restored Schoolhouse Museum, which now sits in a place of prominence on the grounds of the Quogue Library, is open for self-guided tours Thursday through Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Wednesday. 

As the Historical Society pointed out in an email to At Quaquanantuck, “The Schoolhouse is indisputably the most important historic building in the Village. It is not only a rare example of its type and form, but it also survives remarkably intact, with its original 12-over-12 windows—many with original panes of glass—rough-hewn pine floor, and beaded wall boards, featuring 19th century graffiti: carvings of ships and students’ initials. Moreover, it has an entrance hall, which is atypical, as are the vaulted barrel ceilings in the hall and large classroom.

“In anticipation of our celebration of the Schoolhouse’s 200th anniversary, 1822-2022, the Historical Society undertook critical repairs and restoration work on the building, inside and out. The work began in 2019 and was completed in early 2021. The Schoolhouse is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is a contributing resource in the Quogue Historic District (2016).” 

On Saturday, July 17, the QHS will open a new exhibition at the Pond House on Jessup Avenue, “Quogue’s ‘Old Schoolhouse Museum’: The First Exhibition, 1949.” 

In 1893, when the Village built a new and larger schoolhouse for its burgeoning population, Quogue’s one-room Schoolhouse was closed and abandoned. Abram Post rescued the 1822 building from demolition in the early 1900s and moved it to his property just east of the Quogue Library. He used it as a tool shed and workshop for almost 50 years. In 1948, the Post family donated the Schoolhouse to the Library to be operated as a museum. 

On August 24, 1949, the Library’s newly formed Historical Committee, forerunner of the Quogue Historical Society, opened its first exhibition, which featured “furniture, implements, photographs, and documents, many of them dating back to the early settlers in Quogue.”

“Celebrate Art!” Party and Art Show & Sale Return
The QHS is taking its place in restoring the natural order of things by bringing back the popular “Celebrate Art!” cocktails and art talk benefit on Friday, August 13, from 5 to 7 p.m., on the eve of the 55th annual Art Show & Sale to benefit the QHS from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, on the Quogue Village Green on Jessup Avenue.  

After a new school was built, the 1822 Schoolhouse was used by Abram Post as a tool shed and workshop on his propert for 50 years. —Photo courtesy of Quogue Historical Society

Church of the Atonement Has Begun Summer Services
The Reverend Dr. Richard D. McCall returned this week for his 22nd season at the Episcopal Church of the Atonement on Quogue Street, officiating at services on Sunday, June 27. Rev. McCall will officiate for two more weeks at the church, on Sunday, July 4, and Sunday, July 11. 

Reverend Dr. Richard McCall

He and his wife, the Reverend Dr. Terry McCall, live in Bloomington, Indiana. Their daughter Anne and her husband Myles live in New Orleans, a son Ross and his wife Liz are in Atlanta, and a daughter Emily and her husband Trent live in Bloomington with their two boys, Parker and Charlie.

Masks will be required at services, according to a notification from the church, “until we are sure it is safe for everyone.” All children in the community, age 7 to 14, are invited to sing in the junior choir which is led by Patricia Osborne Feiler, organist and choir director. Rehearsals are held at 9 a.m. on Sunday mornings. For additional information regarding the junior choir, contact Mary Vogel via email at mtvogel@icloud.com

Sunday services are at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.; all are welcome. The Church of the Atonement is located at 17 Quogue Street. 

Taking over on Sunday, July 18, for the first of four Sundays will be the Reverend Dr. Robert Dannals, who is now in his 19th season at the church. 

Reverend Dr. Robert Dannals

Rev. Dannals has been serving as a part-time Associate at St. John’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida. He was for many years Rector of Saint Michael and All Angels Church in Dallas, Texas, and served in interim ministry in New York City, Atlanta, and Beverly Hills. He was recently appointed as the Interim Rector for the Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea in Palm Beach, Florida, for the coming year. 

He earned his Masters of Divinity from Virginia Theological Seminary, a Doctor of Ministry from Drew University and a Ph.D. from Graduate Theological. For more than 12 years he has been writing lectionary-based daily e-devotions. 

Rev. Dannals and his wife Valerie have their permanent residence in Jacksonville. They have three daughters: Danielle with two daughters in Jacksonville; Kaleigh, married with one son in Charlotte, North Carolina; and Mary Blair, married in Washington, DC.

Three brothers—Maximus, Marcus and Magnus Haynia—took care of the official flag raising at the Grand Re-Opening of the Quogue Library on Saturday, June 26. —A. Botsford Photo

On June 26 it was indeed a very Grand Re-Opening of the renovated, restored and expanded Quogue Library, with some 522 people touring the spectacular new facility. With a theme of “Honoring the Past; Reaching Out to the Future,” the opening ceremonies went off beautifully, with thoughtful remarks and expressions of gratitude by a number of speakers, raising of the Stars and Stripes by three Boy Scouts who are also brothers, and a moving rendition of the national anthem by the very gifted Grace Gramins before the formal ribbon cutting. 

In a perfect Quogue moment, when applause erupted after Ms. Gramins sang the concluding line of the Star-Spangled Banner, little Georgia Russell, age two and a half, who had been hopping around the flagpole, looked up at the enthusiastically clapping assembled multitude and graced the crowd with a sweeping, deep bow. Born ready for the limelight, it seems. 

During the tours and casual rambling through the library, patrons marveled at the beautiful restoration of the 1897 Library rooms; the wonders of the new Innovation Lab; the space specifically tailored for tweens; the Children’s Room, Children’s Activity Room, Children’s Porch and Garden; the new Art Gallery; the made-over Shinnecock Room and Shinnecock Terrace; and the welcoming Circulation Desk, to name only a few of the fabulous features of the new and yet comfortingly familiar library.

Front Row, left to right, Sally McGrath, Trustee; Catherine Donnelly, consultant, Trustees Philippe McCauliffe, Kathy Lomas and Sarah Adams; Frances Beatty Adler, Co-Chair Capital Campaign; Barbara Sartorius, President Board of Trustees; Trustee Kevin Crowe Sr;. Building Committee Chair Lynda Confessore; Trustee Paul Mejean; Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman; Trustee Pierre de Saint Phalle. Second row, left to right, Tyler Winklevoss and Cameron Winklevoss, Innovation Lab sponsors; Quogue Mayor Peter Sartorius, Assemblyman Fred Thiele Jr.Veronique Louis Photo
Kids wasted no time trying out the new Children’s Activity Room at the library on Saturday. —Veronique Louis Photo

With No “Wild Night” This Summer, Refuge Reaches Out for Support
The sad news is that Director Michael Nelson and the Quogue Wildlife Refuge board have once again had to reach the difficult decision not to host a Wild Night for Wildlife gala fundraiser this summer. The better news is that they are already asking supporters to save the date of July 9, 2022 for next summer’s Wild Night party. 

In the meantime, the mail invitation to the QWR Summer Appeal, a fundraiser established in lieu of the Wild Night for Wildlife benefit, will include a packet of milkweed seeds, to support wildlife in supporters’ own backyards. The summer fundraiser, in whatever form, is traditionally the most important one of the year for the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, as it supports year-round environmental education programming, excellent quality care for resident animals, and maintains the trails and grounds for all to enjoy. No need to wait for the seed packet and invitation in the mail; donations can be made directly on the QWR website, www.quoguewildliferefuge.org, or by clicking on this link, quoguewildliferefuge.org/summerappeal

The lovely Butterfly Garden at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge. —Photo courtesy of QWR

Coming up on Monday, July 12, from 2 to 2:45 p.m., the QWR will host a Kids Painting for Pollinators program for ages 6-12. Participants will take a stroll through the butterfly garden to learn about some plants and butterflies, and then paint a watering can to take home. This program is sponsored by the Leo S. Walsh Foundation. Children should wear a smock or an old tee-shirt as acrylic paints will be used. The fee of $20 per child includes materials. Pre-registration is available here: quoguewildliferefuge.org/events/kids-painting-for-pollinators.

Master pollinator at work. —Photo courtesy of QWR Summer Appeal

“Go Native” Urgent Message: the Bees Need Our Help
For this edition of At Quaquanantuck, Lulie Morrisey and Paula Prentis, self-described “co-motivators-in-chief” of the Go Native initiative in Quogue, have turned their attention to the critical decline in the bee population. 

As Ms. Morrisey wrote this week: “If you look around your garden, you will probably notice few or no bumblebees on your Nepeta (catmint). Likewise, the clover in your lawn should have many honeybees seeking nectar and pollen, and there seem to be very few in these environs. Bee populations have plummeted over the last decades, and without bees the pollinator cycle is broken. Plants do not get pollinated and the food supply—ours and the birds’—is affected. One in every three bites of food, including fruits, vegetables and nuts, depends on bees and other pollinators. 

“While habitat loss and climate change are contributing factors to the dearth of bees, the biggest culprits are the chemicals we are putting on our lawns. The two agrochemicals that are largely responsible for the devastating decline of bees and monarchs are a class of insecticides called neonics, and the weed killer glyphosate (“Roundup”). Neonics are used heavily in agriculture, but they are also included in many commercial sprays used by landscapers against mosquitoes, ticks, etc. (for example, look for Imidacloprid as an ingredient). 

“These products are not only toxic to beneficial insects, but can be harmful to your children and pets. There are ways to keep your lawn healthy without weed killer. And as for mosquitos and ticks, it’s a huge problem for sure, but the number one thing you can do is protect yourself with repellent containing DEET or Picaridin. If you must spray, use only a product containing botanical oils and do target spraying in the early morning when bees are less active, avoiding flowering plants. 

“The severe decline in bees (and monarchs) is cause for much alarm. Taking no action will lead to very dire environmental consequences for us and the natural world. Remember the message of Doug Tallamy: small steps by many individuals … can make a difference.”

Check Library Website for Programming
A quick glance at the Quogue Library website home page reveals that the staff hasn’t missed a step in offering a wide array of programming for young people and adults of all ages. And registering is easy: simply click on the flier for any program that catches your interest and a registration link will pop up. 

Author Sarah Penner

The first installment of the summer Conversations with the Author series is only a week away, with  Sarah Penner, author of “The Lost Apothecary,” the first guest on July 11. Paula McLain, author of “When the Stars Go Dark,” will speak with author Rene Denfeld on July 18; Karin Tanabe, author of “A Woman of Intelligence,” will be the guest author on July 25; David S. Reynolds, author of “Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times,” on August 8; poet John Barr, author of “Dante in China” on August 15; and Alexandra Andrews, author of “Who Is Maud Dixon?” on August 22.

Patrons can opt to go to the library for the Zoom presentations or view them from the comfort of home; the August 22 program with Ms. Andrews will be in-person. To find out more about the series, visit the library website. 

Among the host of programs on offer, on Wednesday, July 7, the library is hosting a book discussion live via Zoom with Carl Safina at 4:30 p.m. The author will discuss three non-human cultures—what they do, why they do it, and how life is for them—in his most recent book, “Becoming Wild.”

The Quogue Library’s Anti-Racism Book Club will be discussing “Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington DC” by Ashante M. Reese live via Zoom on Tuesday, July 13, at 7:30 p.m. 

All those interested in learning more about “Snapseed Photo Editing” can sign up for a virtual workshop on the subject led by Ian on Saturday, July 17, at 10 a.m.

And these are just a few of the programs to be found on the Quogue Library website. Dive in!

Morning glory. —Elizabeth Caputo Photo

Foreign Policy Association Looks North to the Arctic
The next installment of this year’s Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Discussion program will examine “The Coldest War: Toward a Return to Great Power Competition in the Arctic?” Pending any changes based on new guidance, the program will be hosted virtually by the Quogue Library and presented by moderator David Rowe and facilitator Susan Perkins on Saturday from 5 to 6 p.m., on Saturday, July 17.  

The Great Decisions discussion series, America’s largest program on world affairs, involves reading the Great Decisions briefing book and meeting in a Discussion Group to watch a DVD and discuss the most critical global issues facing America today. 

A limited number of discounted briefing books are available for sale through the library; email jbloom@quoguelibrary.org. To purchase a digital copy of the 2021 briefing book, click here. The E-book version of the briefing book is also available at Amazon/Kindle, Rakuten Kobo, Nook (Barnes and Noble), Apple Books , 24symbols.com, and Scribd. To sign up for the July 17 virtual program, click here or visit www.quoguelibrary.org and click on the FPA Great Decisions “Coldest War” flier on the home page.

Barbara Ernst Prey Up Next at Quogue Gallery
This is the last weekend to see “Norman Carton: Lunar and Organic Abstract Expressionist Series” at the Quogue Gallery before the show closes on July 6. 

Next up at the gallery  at 44 Quogue Street will be “Barbara Ernst Prey: Vanishing Point,” running from July 8 to August 4, with an artist reception slated on Saturday, July 10, from 5 to 7 p.m. 

Barbara Ernst Prey, “Vanishing Point,” 2006, watercolor on paper, 28 x 37.8. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

The exhibition will feature 20 works in various mediums—watercolor on paper, oil on panel and canvas and digital print—reflecting the artist’s Long Island roots. Three paintings of Quogue scenes are included in the show. According to the gallery, “Vanishing Point” offers “a comprehensive look at the work of an artist whom Charles A. Riley, Director of the Nassau County Museum of Art, describes in his exhibition catalogue essay as ‘quite simply put, the world’s pre-eminent woman watercolorist.’”  

In his essay, Riley, who has been writing about Prey for decades, notes that “Starting within the realist category, the clear descent from Mary Cassatt, Rosa Bonheur … Georgia O’Keeffe and others seems limiting … open the frame to include abstraction and a different matrilineal prospect follows—Mitchell, Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Jane Wilson, Mary Abbott and perhaps closest in terms of sheer aesthetics, Helen Frankenthaler. 

“The Ninth Street Women are enjoying a moment … offering Prey a group context one generation removed who accomplished by virtue of their own pluck and talent the forging of a style both painterly and powerful that locks down its claim to posterity. The only two women appointed to the National Council on the Arts are Prey and Frankenthaler. Both of them embody a cardinal principle of aesthetics: Originality married to technique earns this ranking.” 

One of America’s most renowned contemporary artists, Barbara  Ernst Prey was recently commissioned by MASS MoCA to create the largest known watercolor painting  (8 by 15 feet) for a new building. Prey’s work also resides in the National Gallery of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the New York Historical Society, Kennedy Space Center and the permanent collection of the White House, where she is one of just two living female artists represented. In addition, the artist’s work has been featured and discussed in numerous books and publications, and on radio and television programs.

Prey earned a Bachelor’s degree from Williams College, where she is an adjunct faculty member, and a Master’s degree from Harvard University. She has received numerous institutional accolades, including a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation enabling her to spend a year painting in Asia, a Fulbright Scholarship, and the New York State Senate’s “Women of Distinction” Award. She maintains studios in New York, Maine, and Massachusetts.

Barbara Ernst Prey, “Variations of Color,” 2021, watercolor on paper, 11 x 14. —Image courtesy of Quogue Gallery

Summer Film Series Heating Up at Performing Arts Center
Tickets are on sale now for the next films in the 2021 Rose and Don Ciampa World Cinema summer series at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center. 

Films are screened on Tuesday and Wednesday at 7:30, with Andrew Botsford of Quogue introducing the films on Tuesday evenings and discussing them afterward, often with guest commentators, followed by an informal audience discussion. 

“Les Notres” screens on July 6 and 7.

The lineup for July begins with “Les Notres” (“Our Own”) on July 6 and 7. According to the intriguing PAC description, “To the tight-knit community of Sainte-Adeline, Quebec, Magalie appears as a normal suburban high school sophomore surrounded by friends. But this popular teenage girl is harboring a shocking secret: she’s pregnant. When Magalie refuses to identify the father, suspicions among the townsfolk come to a boiling point and the layers of a carefully maintained social varnish eventually crack.”

On July 13 and 14, the film will be “Final Account,” described as “an urgent portrait of the last living generation of everyday people to participate in Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich. Over a decade in the making, the film raises vital, timely questions about authority, conformity, complicity and perpetration, national identity, and responsibility, as men and women ranging from former SS members to civilians in never-before-seen interviews reckon with—in very different ways—their memories, perceptions and personal appraisals of their own roles in the greatest human crimes in history.”

And on July 20 and 21, the film will be “Can You Bring It: Bill T. Jones and D-Man in the Waters.” This documentary “traces the remarkable history and legacy of one of the most important works of art to come out of the age of AIDS –choreographer Bill T. Jones’s tour de force ballet “D-Man in the Waters.” In 1989, D-Man in the Waters gave physical manifestation to the fear, anger, grief, and hope for salvation that the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company felt as they were embattled by the AIDS pandemic. As a group of young dancers reconstructs the dance, they learn about this oft forgotten history and deepen their understanding of the power of art in a time of plague.”

A complete list of this summer’s films, with trailers, is available on the PAC website. For more information about PAC protocols and to purchase tickets, visit whbpac.org and click on Films


Graduation Time
This is the time of year for graduations, one of the signals that summer is truly underway. At Quaquanantuck salutes all graduates, with special recognition for some of the ones that readers have let me know about. 

Maxwell Smith

Maxwell Smith, son of Joanie Mullen and Gabe Smith, graduated from Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music, Dance and Performing Arts in NYC last week. He studied in the Technical Theater Studio and has worked some summers with QJTT here in Quogue. 

Max will be attending John Cabot University in Rome, Italy, for his freshman year and then Tulane University. The graduation was in a great venue: at Central Park Summerstage. 

Maud Fitzpatrick

Maud Fitzpatrick, daughter of Tara Fitzpatrick, went to the Quogue School starting in fourth grade, graduated this year, and will now be attending Westhampton Beach Middle School in the fall. 

At Quaquanantuck also learned of three 2021 graduating seniors from Westminster School who reside at least part-time in Quogue: Miranda Douglass, daughter of Stephanie and Andrew Douglass; Hunter Hoogkamp, son of Carolyn and Greg Hoogkamp; and William Mazzaro, son of Laura and Gene Mazzaro.

Please send news (and photos!) of any other Quogue graduates to AtQuaq@gmail.com.


Haywire Bringing It All Back Home
Haywire owner Raenell Murray is continuing the practice she initiated last summer, inviting her faithful customers, as well as new friends, to come to her house to see all of the clothing items she is selling.

A sample of items available from Haywire.

Ms. Murray recently advised At Quaquanantuck that there will be regular priced items in the house and a barn full of sale items. All are invited to come see fabulous French capris and trousers, cashmere sweaters, shawls, colorful tops, jewelry and much more. Call Ms. Murray at 631-283-2809 to set up an appointment.   


Musicians of the Manhattan Chamber Players at the Quogue Chamber Music concert on July 12. —Mary Thames Louis Photo

Following the unqualified success of the June 12 concert, Quogue Chamber Music impresario Jane Deckoff offered this message to At Quaquanantuck: “Thank you to Jeff Ryvicker and the Quogue Elementary School for their generosity in providing their faculty and staff parking lot for the tent … We were also gratified by the decent weather and by the fact that the acoustics turned out to be excellent … the Quogue audience leapt to their feet and gave the musicians a standing ovation after the Chausson.  Everyone was just so excited to be up and about that any stress and the hard work were well worth it.”

The fully vaccinated audience enjoyed dropping their masks for the Quogue Chamber Music concert on June 12. —Mary Thames Louis Photo

Write America Keeps the Light Bright
At Quaquanantuck continues to be amazed by—and very grateful for—the seemingly endless roster of extraordinarily talented, sensitive, and insightful writers who have happily signed up to be on the ongoing weekly program Write America: A Reading for Our Country

The brainchild of the prodigiously gifted writer, teacher and Quogue boulevardier Roger Rosenblatt, Write America offers beautiful readings and stimulating discussions aimed at mending some of the rifts roiling our nation, airing on Monday evenings at 7 p.m. on the Crowdcast channel hosted by Book Revue, the wonderful, community minded gem of an independent bookstore located in Huntington.

Even as in-person programs resume, the virtual Write America series continues to put together writers in far-flung locations for engaging discussions that can be accessed by anyone around the world, live in real time or in a recorded version.   

To catch up on what the series is all about, At Quaquanantuck recommends a visit to the Book Revue website, bookrevue.com/write-america-series, where you can access recordings of all the readings and conversations of the series up to now. 

The June 21 program featured author, editor and professor Lou Ann Walker, Quogue’s own Whiting Award-winning author and professor Genevieve Sly Crane, and short story writer Jeordie Chou. Coming up on Monday, July 5, will be novelist and screenwriter Susan Isaacs, novelist and playwright Jean Hanff Korelitz, and Pulitzer Prize nominated author Ishmael Reed; on July 12, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Gregory Pardlo and sportswriter and novelist Robert Lipsyte; on July 19, Kate Lehrer, former New Yorker contributor Elizabeth Hawes Weinstock, and Pushcart Prize-winning poet David Tomas Martinez; and on July 26, novelist and journalist Joyce Maynard and poet and essayist Adrienne Unger

Write America runs weekly, every Monday at 7 p.m. EST on Book Revue’s Crowdcast channel. All events are free; registration is required at bookrevue.com/write-america-series. A selection of signed titles will be available for purchase with each Write America episode; Book Revue ships worldwide. For more information, click here or visit bookrevue.com/write-america-series.

Your Comments Welcome
At Quaquanantuck is happy to provide a forum for civil discussion of village issues and initiatives and welcomes all comments. All are encouraged to share observations, ideas and opinions by writing to AtQuaq@gmail.com

News Items and Photos
At Quaquanantuck encourages readers to send in news and notes and photos of interest to Quogue residents, even if the items are being sent from winter addresses or other parts of the country—or the world. Friends and family who enjoy all things Quogue are encouraged to email AtQuaq@gmail.com and ask to be put on the mailing list.